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Stuart Reges

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, Michael Gehman seems about as straight arrow as they come. A dedicated environmentalist, the UCLA philosophy professor enjoys camping in the wilderness. He was an Eagle Scout. And he has won the school's coveted distinguished teaching assistant award. "We've got a couple of (philosophy teachers) who missed the bus to Berkeley," said UCLA Police Chief John Barber, "but this guy is a very conservative young man."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, Michael Gehman seems about as straight arrow as they come. A dedicated environmentalist, the UCLA philosophy professor enjoys camping in the wilderness. He was an Eagle Scout. And he has won the school's coveted distinguished teaching assistant award. "We've got a couple of (philosophy teachers) who missed the bus to Berkeley," said UCLA Police Chief John Barber, "but this guy is a very conservative young man."
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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stanford University, already embroiled in controversy for its seemingly lavish use of federal grant money, has launched an investigation into the drug use and drug advocacy of a popular lecturer.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Stuart Reges says he wants to world to know that he is not another Timothy Leary. He says that he never advocated widespread drug use to his students at Stanford University, where he has been a highly esteemed lecturer in computer science for 11 years. "I think most people shouldn't do drugs. But what I would like to see is a balanced view of drugs presented to people and allowing people to make their own choices," Reges said in an interview from his office at the Palo Alto campus.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Stuart Reges says he wants to world to know that he is not another Timothy Leary. He says that he never advocated widespread drug use to his students at Stanford University, where he has been a highly esteemed lecturer in computer science for 11 years. "I think most people shouldn't do drugs. But what I would like to see is a balanced view of drugs presented to people and allowing people to make their own choices," Reges said in an interview from his office at the Palo Alto campus.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stuart Reges, an award-winning Stanford University lecturer who recently sparked a national controversy by aggressively attacking federal drug policy, was fired Friday. University officials announced that they were dismissing Reges, 32, for violating the school's anti-drug policy by carrying illegal drugs on campus and paying for alcoholic beverages for students under the legal drinking age of 21. Reges, according to Engineering School Dean James F.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIME EDUCATION WRITER
Stanford University President Donald Kennedy, buffeted by months of high-profile controversies--especially the university's spending of federal research money--announced his resignation Monday. Kennedy's decision to step down in August, 1992, was detailed in a letter to Stanford's Board of Trustees. "At present we are talking too much about our problems and too little about our opportunities," Kennedy said in the letter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | TONY PERRY
This being the Sabbath, it must be time for some irreverent religious satire. So says Mike Yaconelli, a Christian minister and San Diego refugee who for 20 years has been editing "The Door," a stick-it-in-your eye satire magazine specializing in the follies of the devout. Call his slick bimonthly the Evangelical National Lampoon, and Yaconelli won't mind. Call it the Religious Mad Magazine and he'll be downright pleased.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stanford University, already embroiled in controversy for its seemingly lavish use of federal grant money, has launched an investigation into the drug use and drug advocacy of a popular lecturer.
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