Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStuart Ross
IN THE NEWS

Stuart Ross

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1991 | FRANKIE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sparky, Smudge, Jinx and Frankie are Forever Plaid, four "good guys" who sing '50s tunes in velvety, four-part harmony. New York playwright Stuart Ross created the young innocents, and then he killed them off. They were about to embarrass themselves. They were about to sing "Three Coins in a Fountain" in plaid tuxedos for their first gig. In 1964. Definitely uncool.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
"Doo-wah, doo-wah, DOO-WAH!" The voices of 19 teenagers of varying ages, sizes and shapes fill the Buckley School gymnasium theater in Sherman Oaks, blending like a 1950s Teen Angel dream, rising in a crescendo of pitch-perfect multiples of four-part harmony. Born long after the "Heart and Soul" generation, the young performers, stretching in chorus line fashion across a small proscenium stage, are finding a euphoric high in singing pop hits of the past.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frankie, Jinx, Sparky and Smudge may be stuck in day jobs, but they haven't lost sight of their show-biz dreams. As the Four Plaids, this crooning quartet sees itself as the next big group, up there with the Four Aces or the Crew Cuts. What they do lose sight of is a Catholic school bus loaded with teen-agers. It creams them on the way to their first gig at the Airport Hilton Cocktail Bar.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It would seem almost unpatriotic to say anything negative about Stuart Ross' slight musical frolic "Forever Plaid," now at Plummer Auditorium under the auspices of the Fullerton Civic Light Opera. It's a valentine to an America in a more naive frame of mind, to an era when pop music rang with melody, when young people had dreams that lasted more than 15 minutes. That the piece is slight doesn't matter. It's pure entertainment and the perfect way to pass a warm summer evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
"Doo-wah, doo-wah, DOO-WAH!" The voices of 19 teenagers of varying ages, sizes and shapes fill the Buckley School gymnasium theater in Sherman Oaks, blending like a 1950s Teen Angel dream, rising in a crescendo of pitch-perfect multiples of four-part harmony. Born long after the "Heart and Soul" generation, the young performers, stretching in chorus line fashion across a small proscenium stage, are finding a euphoric high in singing pop hits of the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Stuart Ross had this idea for a show about a '50s quartet that sings beautiful love songs but knows nothing of love. Workshops came and went, and so did producers. He didn't know how many more stuffed dogs, bow ties, Hula-Hoops, suitcases, microphones and printing or fire-eating-fluid bills he could put on his credit cards. He'd hit around $8,000 worth of charges by the time producer Gene Wolsk happened into the New York cabaret where "Forever Plaid" was shaping up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It would seem almost unpatriotic to say anything negative about Stuart Ross' slight musical frolic "Forever Plaid," now at Plummer Auditorium under the auspices of the Fullerton Civic Light Opera. It's a valentine to an America in a more naive frame of mind, to an era when pop music rang with melody, when young people had dreams that lasted more than 15 minutes. That the piece is slight doesn't matter. It's pure entertainment and the perfect way to pass a warm summer evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Excitement dances in Stuart Ross' eyes. "I love creating shows," the director says. "I love being in a room with writers and actors and laughing until we can't breathe. Or getting so excited about a piece of staging that you want to shout like you've just discovered the cure for cancer." It's a thrill he's experienced repeatedly in staging "Forever Plaid," his musical tribute to 1950s four-part guy groups, at theaters across the country.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1985
Xerox Corp. named Stuart B. Ross vice president-finance and control and chief financial officer. The company also named Alan Z. Senter treasurer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
Excitement dances in Stuart Ross' eyes. "I love creating shows," the director says. "I love being in a room with writers and actors and laughing until we can't breathe. Or getting so excited about a piece of staging that you want to shout like you've just discovered the cure for cancer." It's a thrill he's experienced repeatedly in staging "Forever Plaid," his musical tribute to 1950s four-part guy groups, at theaters across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frankie, Jinx, Sparky and Smudge may be stuck in day jobs, but they haven't lost sight of their show-biz dreams. As the Four Plaids, this crooning quartet sees itself as the next big group, up there with the Four Aces or the Crew Cuts. What they do lose sight of is a Catholic school bus loaded with teen-agers. It creams them on the way to their first gig at the Airport Hilton Cocktail Bar.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Stuart Ross had this idea for a show about a '50s quartet that sings beautiful love songs but knows nothing of love. Workshops came and went, and so did producers. He didn't know how many more stuffed dogs, bow ties, Hula-Hoops, suitcases, microphones and printing or fire-eating-fluid bills he could put on his credit cards. He'd hit around $8,000 worth of charges by the time producer Gene Wolsk happened into the New York cabaret where "Forever Plaid" was shaping up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1991 | FRANKIE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sparky, Smudge, Jinx and Frankie are Forever Plaid, four "good guys" who sing '50s tunes in velvety, four-part harmony. New York playwright Stuart Ross created the young innocents, and then he killed them off. They were about to embarrass themselves. They were about to sing "Three Coins in a Fountain" in plaid tuxedos for their first gig. In 1964. Definitely uncool.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2000
Harry Groener, Shirley Knight, Sharon Lawrence and Stephanie Zimbalist headline a celebration of the wit and elegance of Noel Coward, "A Cowardly Cavalcade," an evening of song at the Pasadena Playhouse on Dec. 11 at 7:30 p.m. Directed by Stuart Ross, with musical direction by Brad Ellis, the theatrical concert will feature such songs as "A Room With a View," "Mad About the Boy," "I'll See You Again" and "Mad Dogs and Englishmen."Admission is a suggested donation of $15. (626) 356-7529.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2001
* Aeolian Ballet Theatre presents the four-part "Shakespeare Without Words" on July 27 at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. East, Hollywood. $12 to $25. (323) 461-3673. * Doug Varone and Dancers will perform a new work on July 27 at the Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido, Santa Barbara. $18.50 to $35. (805) 963-0761. * Ballet Pacifica will host the 11th annual Pacifica Choreographic Project on July 28 at the South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|