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Stuart Spencer

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October 20, 2002 | Mark Z. Barabak, Mark Z. Barabak is a Times staff writer who covers politics. He last wrote for the magazine about Arnold Schwarzenegger's political aspirations.
High above Palm Springs, past the intersection of Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra drives, lives a celebrity of a different sort, a man as famous and influential in his way as either of those two legends. There is no desert boulevard immortalizing Stuart K. Spencer. Not even a side street or alley. But of the three men, he arguably had the most important impact on world events, helping shape history from a place just offstage.
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NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Beats there a Republican heart that doesn't thrill to the saga of the 1980 presidential campaign? And what a saga it is: Ronald Reagan, derided as a combination right-wing cowboy and washed-up movie actor, enters the one and only candidate debate a mere week before the election, facing all-but-certain doom against President Jimmy Carter. He then proceeds to wipe the floor of the Cleveland Convention Center with the hapless incumbent. "There you go again," he quipped, when Carter went after Reagan for alleged designs to slash Medicare.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
The Republican California political guru who crafted four successful Ronald Reagan campaigns, two for governor and two for president, does not watch Fox News or its conservative bobblehead pundits. Why not? Fox News has an agenda, 82-year-old Stuart Spencer said over breakfast in Palm Desert, where he and his wife make their home. Same is true of MSNBC, he said. One goes right and the other goes left, and Spencer doesn't see why those interested in educating themselves on matters of national importance would turn to either for reliable information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2011 | Steve Lopez
What do "tea party" beauty queen Sarah Palin and U2 guitarist the Edge have in common? Nothing, aside from the fact that I have something to say about each of them today and can't bear to let either one off the hook. So think of this as two columns for the price of one. Actually, Palin and David "the Edge" Evans do have something in common. Each is selling something I'm not buying. Palin would have you believe she's the second coming of Ronald Reagan, and the Edge would have you believe his proposed mountaintop compound near Malibu is a monument to environmental sensitivity.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Beats there a Republican heart that doesn't thrill to the saga of the 1980 presidential campaign? And what a saga it is: Ronald Reagan, derided as a combination right-wing cowboy and washed-up movie actor, enters the one and only candidate debate a mere week before the election, facing all-but-certain doom against President Jimmy Carter. He then proceeds to wipe the floor of the Cleveland Convention Center with the hapless incumbent. "There you go again," he quipped, when Carter went after Reagan for alleged designs to slash Medicare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2011 | Steve Lopez
What do "tea party" beauty queen Sarah Palin and U2 guitarist the Edge have in common? Nothing, aside from the fact that I have something to say about each of them today and can't bear to let either one off the hook. So think of this as two columns for the price of one. Actually, Palin and David "the Edge" Evans do have something in common. Each is selling something I'm not buying. Palin would have you believe she's the second coming of Ronald Reagan, and the Edge would have you believe his proposed mountaintop compound near Malibu is a monument to environmental sensitivity.
OPINION
May 1, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox 11 News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Stuart K. Spencer at Spencer's home in Palm Desert, Calif.
"Politics is never a science," Stu Spencer likes to say. "It's always an art." While Richard M. Nixon--the first Californian elected President--is credited with bringing the state into the political mainstream, it was Stuart K. Spencer who developed the modern California political campaign style, made it into an art form and exported it nationwide. As the dean of Western political consultants, Spencer helped make Ronald Reagan look engaged and informed, Gerald R.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1999
South Coast Repertory's NewSCRipts series, which offers a preliminary glimpse of five new plays done as readings, begins Monday on the Mainstage with "In the Western Garden," by Stuart Spencer. Set in Renaissance Florence and late '80s Long Island, the play deals with the nature of art through encounters between established greats (one of them Michelangelo) and young aspiring artists. Other readings in the 1999-2000 series are scheduled for Dec. 6, Jan.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001
Foothill Independent Bancorp has named Cheryl Brown president of Platinum Results Inc., a subsidiary of the Glendora-based Foothill holding company of Foothill Independent Bank. The new unit provides back-room services to other financial institutions as well as data access and management services. Brown was vice president and data processing manager of Foothill Independent Bank. Stuart Spencer Executive search firm Stuart Spencer has opened an office in Irvine and named Michael C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
The Republican California political guru who crafted four successful Ronald Reagan campaigns, two for governor and two for president, does not watch Fox News or its conservative bobblehead pundits. Why not? Fox News has an agenda, 82-year-old Stuart Spencer said over breakfast in Palm Desert, where he and his wife make their home. Same is true of MSNBC, he said. One goes right and the other goes left, and Spencer doesn't see why those interested in educating themselves on matters of national importance would turn to either for reliable information.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 2002 | Mark Z. Barabak, Mark Z. Barabak is a Times staff writer who covers politics. He last wrote for the magazine about Arnold Schwarzenegger's political aspirations.
High above Palm Springs, past the intersection of Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra drives, lives a celebrity of a different sort, a man as famous and influential in his way as either of those two legends. There is no desert boulevard immortalizing Stuart K. Spencer. Not even a side street or alley. But of the three men, he arguably had the most important impact on world events, helping shape history from a place just offstage.
OPINION
May 1, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox 11 News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Stuart K. Spencer at Spencer's home in Palm Desert, Calif.
"Politics is never a science," Stu Spencer likes to say. "It's always an art." While Richard M. Nixon--the first Californian elected President--is credited with bringing the state into the political mainstream, it was Stuart K. Spencer who developed the modern California political campaign style, made it into an art form and exported it nationwide. As the dean of Western political consultants, Spencer helped make Ronald Reagan look engaged and informed, Gerald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988
I take issue with Stuart Spencer's column ("Why Bush Is Recalling the Jimmy Carter Years," Opinion, May 8) dredging up the Carter presidency in order to emphasize a so-called lack of foreign policy experience in Democratic candidates. Let's look at where Ronald Reagan's "expertise" has led us: a tremendous "victory" in Grenada to draw our attention away from the deaths of U.S. Marines in Lebanon; the Iran-Contra debacle; the Noriega fiasco; horrendous national debt because of pie-in-the-sky ideas, e.g. Star Wars and other insanities to keep defense contractors happy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Gov. Pete Wilson is about to lose another longtime adviser from his personal staff, with the pending resignation of political operative Marty Wilson. The governor on Sunday lost a vital cog in his Administration--as well as a close friend--when communications director Otto Bos, 47, died of a heart attack while playing soccer. Marty Wilson, deputy chief of staff, also is a veteran member of the governor's inner circle of advisers.
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