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Stuart Symington

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December 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Stuart Symington, former U.S. senator from Missouri, died of heart failure at his home early today, a son said. He was 87. The Democrat served in the Senate from 1953 to 1977, deciding not to seek a fifth term, and held various posts within President Harry S. Truman's administration from 1945 to 1952, including Air Force secretary in 1947-50. He was a favorite-son candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1956 and 1960, losing to Adlai E. Stevenson and John F. Kennedy respectively.
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NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Stuart Symington, a former U.S. senator from Missouri, two-time presidential aspirant and the first secretary of the Air Force, died of heart failure at his home here Wednesday. He was 87 and had been ill with "angina and weakness of the heart," said a son, James Symington, a Washington lawyer and former Missouri congressman. The Democrat served in the Senate from 1953 until he chose not to seek reelection in 1976.
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NEWS
December 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Stuart Symington, a former U.S. senator from Missouri, two-time presidential aspirant and the first secretary of the Air Force, died of heart failure at his home here Wednesday. He was 87 and had been ill with "angina and weakness of the heart," said a son, James Symington, a Washington lawyer and former Missouri congressman. The Democrat served in the Senate from 1953 until he chose not to seek reelection in 1976.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Stuart Symington, former U.S. senator from Missouri, died of heart failure at his home early today, a son said. He was 87. The Democrat served in the Senate from 1953 to 1977, deciding not to seek a fifth term, and held various posts within President Harry S. Truman's administration from 1945 to 1952, including Air Force secretary in 1947-50. He was a favorite-son candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1956 and 1960, losing to Adlai E. Stevenson and John F. Kennedy respectively.
SPORTS
September 24, 1988
Stuart Symington Janney Jr., one of the nation's most respected horse breeders and the owner of Ruffian, was killed in an automobile accident while driving home to his horse farm in Glyndon, Md. He was 81.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1986
"General Dynamics: A Laboratory for Ethics" (Viewpoints, Dec. 29) could be a milestone for the aerospace industry. Earl Cheit should carry his helpful advice to the prime practitioner of ethical misconduct--the U.S. government. As he may be aware, it was President Harry S. Truman's Secretary of the Air Force Stuart Symington who tried to force Northrop Aircraft out of business when Northrop refused his demand to merge with the predecessor to today's General Dynamics. "Lead by example"--indeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2000
Diane Divers Blair, 61, a political science professor who befriended and advised President Clinton. Blair became a friend of the president and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the early 1970s, when the couple taught classes at the University of Arkansas, where she was on the faculty. In 1992, Blair was a member of the national Democratic Platform Committee at the convention that nominated Clinton to run against President George Bush, and she served as senior researcher during the campaign.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Jack Northrop, the aviation pioneer who founded Northrop Corp., was granted an extraordinary government security clearance just before his death in 1981 to see the company's design for the B-2 Stealth bomber, which resurrects the "flying wing" concept he had invented in the 1940s, the company's chairman disclosed Wednesday. "I went to the Air Force and said, 'Let this man know,' " Northrop Chairman Thomas V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1991 | WILLIAM F. RAWSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Fife Symington, who promised voters he would restore Arizona's respectability, is facing personal and political problems after eight months in office. He calls it his "dark period." The state has struggled through a dark period of its own, including the 1988 impeachment of Gov. Evan Mecham, years of controversy over the Legislature's refusal to enact a paid state holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the collapse of Charles Keating Jr.'
SPORTS
February 22, 1996 | MAL FLORENCE
In an article in the February issue of Esquire magazine, Michael Wilbon writes of the physical abuse Orlando's Shaquille O'Neal takes in the NBA: "Johnny Bach--the sage veteran assistant basketball coach of the Charlotte Hornets who's been around such antediluvian centers as George Mikan, Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar--says of the pounding Shaq takes in the post: " 'Nobody, not even Wilt in his prime, was tormented like this guy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1999 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
No doubt about it. We're heading straight for the blood bath. Now we're getting word from the White House that a buildup of 50,000 troops on the Kosovo border with Macedonia is the next order of business. Wait for the next upward revision to 150,000 in a week or so. Then 200,000 . . . We've got an administration that doesn't know how to cut its losses and that is therefore prepared to wipe Serbia off the map rather than lose face. In short, we're in the countdown phase to disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2006 | From the Washington Post
In the midst of the Depression, Reathel Odum was learning to decipher interest and dividends at a bank in receivership in St. Louis when she was introduced to Missouri Sen. Harry S. Truman. She was about 25 and admittedly "scared to death," never having spoken to a senator before. Truman came to the bank looking to fill a vacancy in his Washington office. After interviewing Odum and two other women, Odum was offered the job. She had one condition before she could accept, though.
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