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Stuart Timmons

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2008 | Kate Linthicum, Linthicum is a Times staff writer.
Stuart Timmons has spent most of his life telling the story of gay Los Angeles. As a journalist, he has written bestselling books on the history of the community. And as a gay man, he has endured its struggles and celebrated its triumphs. In January, as he was finishing a book about gay men who were imprisoned because of their sexuality, Timmons suffered a stroke.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2008 | Kate Linthicum, Linthicum is a Times staff writer.
Stuart Timmons has spent most of his life telling the story of gay Los Angeles. As a journalist, he has written bestselling books on the history of the community. And as a gay man, he has endured its struggles and celebrated its triumphs. In January, as he was finishing a book about gay men who were imprisoned because of their sexuality, Timmons suffered a stroke.
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BOOKS
November 5, 2006 | Eloise Klein Healy, Eloise Klein Healy, founding editor of Arktoi Books at Red Hen Press, is the author of the forthcoming collection "The Islands Project: Poems for Sappho."
ANGELENOS accept with bemused irritation the various wacky notions of the city and its residents penned by short-term visitors or long-term rivals such as those living in the Bay Area or on the East Coast. It's boring to be forever reminded that we don't have real seasons or that we've adopted beachwear as our fashion standard. But it's not inconsequential that a major urban center could be continually dismissed by its critics, especially when it comes to the significant role played by L.A.'
BOOKS
November 5, 2006 | Eloise Klein Healy, Eloise Klein Healy, founding editor of Arktoi Books at Red Hen Press, is the author of the forthcoming collection "The Islands Project: Poems for Sappho."
ANGELENOS accept with bemused irritation the various wacky notions of the city and its residents penned by short-term visitors or long-term rivals such as those living in the Bay Area or on the East Coast. It's boring to be forever reminded that we don't have real seasons or that we've adopted beachwear as our fashion standard. But it's not inconsequential that a major urban center could be continually dismissed by its critics, especially when it comes to the significant role played by L.A.'
BOOKS
February 15, 1987
This is to request information concerning Maila Nurmi for biographical research purposes. Miss Nurmi was best known for the Vampira character she developed for her 1954 Los Angeles- based television show. She appeared as a comedienne on network television during that period and in several low-budget films before disappearing from the public eye in the early 1960s. Prior to her work in Hollywood, Nurmi appeared in two Mike Todd shows in New York. Anyone with knowledge of Nurmi's life and work on either coast, please contact me at the following address.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Harry Frazier, an actor whose full white beard helped win him Santa Claus roles in movies and commercials but who performed far more often on stage and television, has died. He was 77. Frazier died May 26 at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, said Jaime Larkin, a spokeswoman for the hospital. The cause was complications from diabetes. For some years he had been a resident of the assisted-living facility adjoining the hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994
Jan Breslauer's coverage of Celebration Theatre ("Visibility. Stability. Now, the Next Step," Sept. 11) is an overdue look at L.A.'s oldest lesbian and gay theater. But her conclusions are quite different from those I made as a reviewer of Celebration's plays for much of the 1980s. The piece suggested that Celebration had only recently staged socially relevant productions, and contrasted its "stunted" fare to East Coast AIDS dramas staged in 1985. But in 1983, Celebration offered Bob Hagedorn's "One."
OPINION
October 13, 1996
The comic strip "Doonesbury" has featured Prop. 215 on California's November ballot, supposedly aimed at legalization of marijuana for medicinal purposes. I am quite familiar with both the ideology of "Doonesbury's" creator, Garry Trudeau, and his style of humor. I have even been known to chuckle at a "Doonesbury" strip. Today, however, no one should be laughing. The debate over legalization of marijuana for any purpose is a serious one with lifetime consequences for potentially millions of people, especially children and teenagers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Rob Cole, a pioneering gay journalist whose efforts helped create a national readership for the Advocate, the long-running gay publication, died June 30 at his home in North Hills. He was 76. Cole died after a long struggle with Parkinson's disease, complicated by pneumonia and a chronic back ailment, according to a longtime friend, Rob McCoard. Cole had been an editor for 17 years at the Dallas Times-Herald when he left to join the Advocate as news editor in 1969, two years after its founding.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oreste F. Pucciani, a pioneering foreign language professor who was instrumental in introducing the ideas of French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre to American academics, has died. Pucciani, who taught French at UCLA for 31 years and chaired its French department from 1961 to 1966, was 83 when he died April 28 in Los Angeles of heart disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2004 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Twenty years ago -- before Ellen DeGeneres came out and before the "L-word" entered the mainstream vocabulary -- the Lesbian Writers Series began raising the visibility of women who wished to publicly acknowledge their lesbian identity. About 60 people gathered Sunday to celebrate the literary series, a platform for women to share their work and confront their identity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Myra Riddell, a psychotherapist, former president of the Los Angeles County Commission for Women and pioneering activist for lesbian and gay rights, died Jan. 11 at her Studio City home. She was 81. Riddell had Alzheimer's disease, according to a longtime friend, Susan M. Wolford.
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