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Stuart Z Levin

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BUSINESS
June 9, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After MCA Inc. and Paramount Pictures last month sold their stake in TVN Entertainment to him, TVN's founding partner Stuart Z. Levin declared jubilantly that he had regained control of the satellite broadcasting company in Burbank. "I'm comfortable now that I'm back in control," said the stylish 44-year-old Brooklyn native. But the unexpected breakup of TVN's partnership also raised a big question: How will TVN, which analysts believe is losing money at a clip, survive without the big studios?
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burbank-based entrepreneur is an early entrant into the race to produce and broadcast high-definition television programs and movies--but analysts say Stuart Levin may be too early. In the first six months of this year, Levin and New York-based Rebo Studios plan to open a studio to produce high-definition programming--movies and TV shows produced with a new technology that makes videotape and television transmissions much clearer than they are now.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burbank-based entrepreneur is an early entrant into the race to produce and broadcast high-definition television programs and movies--but analysts say Stuart Levin may be too early. In the first six months of this year, Levin and New York-based Rebo Studios plan to open a studio to produce high-definition programming--movies and TV shows produced with a new technology that makes videotape and television transmissions much clearer than they are now.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After MCA Inc. and Paramount Pictures last month sold their stake in TVN Entertainment to him, TVN's founding partner Stuart Z. Levin declared jubilantly that he had regained control of the satellite broadcasting company in Burbank. "I'm comfortable now that I'm back in control," said the stylish 44-year-old Brooklyn native. But the unexpected breakup of TVN's partnership also raised a big question: How will TVN, which analysts believe is losing money at a clip, survive without the big studios?
BUSINESS
May 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
MCA, Paramount Divests Stake in TVN Entertainment: MCA Inc. and Paramount Pictures said they transferred their stake in the Burbank-based satellite broadcaster back to founding partner Stuart Z. Levin. The two movie studios took a controlling interest in TVN 15 months ago. TVN offers 10 different channels of movies on a pay-per-view basis to about 100,000 back-yard satellite dish customers. Levin said TVN is proceeding with expansion plans and will continue to license MCA and Paramount movies.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1988 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Tired of schlepping back and forth to the video store to rent your favorite movies? A newly formed company called Touchtone Video Network Inc. thinks that it has an answer to your problems. Santa Monica-based TVN has announced what it calls a "revolutionary" new satellite-fed television programming system that will allow you to electronically "rent" videocassettes by simply dialing an AT&T 800 service number. You won't have to drive anywhere or carry anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | TERRY ATKINSON
There was a lot of media hoopla last week about a plan that will enable owners of home-satellite dishes to "rent" videos without going to the video store. Well, maybe not a lot of hoopla compared to something like the did-Dan Quayle-dodge-the-draft issue, but good news--or any news--about the beleaguered home-satellite industry is rare these days, and very welcome in the 2 million homes with one of those dishes sitting in the back yard.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA
While these days it seems that any company related to the Internet grabs headlines and investors' attention, a little Los Angeles company is hoping to go big-time with one of life's staples: bread. In an effort to capture a larger slice of the $6-billion specialty bread market, La Brea Bakery of Los Angeles is in the midst of a major expansion--after raising $10 million from a private institution--to become the largest artisanal, or specialty, bakery in the United States.
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