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SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
An epic battle is raging in South Florida: man against snail. The state is struggling to contain an invasion of the giant African land snail, a species that thrives in hot and wet tropical climates. These gooey and destructive mollusks grow up to 8.5 inches long, feast on 500 different types of plants and nibble on calcium-rich stucco, which they use to construct their cone-shaped shells. The snails are originally from East Africa but can now be found throughout the world. Aside from destroying plants and buildings, they can also be carriers of a type of meningitis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
An epic battle is raging in South Florida: man against snail. The state is struggling to contain an invasion of the giant African land snail, a species that thrives in hot and wet tropical climates. These gooey and destructive mollusks grow up to 8.5 inches long, feast on 500 different types of plants and nibble on calcium-rich stucco, which they use to construct their cone-shaped shells. The snails are originally from East Africa but can now be found throughout the world. Aside from destroying plants and buildings, they can also be carriers of a type of meningitis.
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HOME & GARDEN
July 16, 2011 | By Lisa Boone, Los Angeles Times
When Amy Lippman first called her architect about renovating a Carpinteria beach house she had just bought, she tried to find humor in the design challenge ahead by asking: "Do you want to work on a Taco Bell?" The house wasn't really a fast-food drive-through, of course, but a 1977 stucco box with unfortunate architectural flourishes. Lippman's husband, Rodman Flender, thought she was nuts. After viewing the property for the first time, Los Angeles architect Rachel Allen had to agree with her client's initial assessment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The new Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood isn't just the first ground-up building by the 42-year-old Los Angeles architect Peter Zellner. A clean-lined, windowless stucco box on Orange Grove Avenue just south of Santa Monica Boulevard, it is also almost entirely free-standing. Attached on one of its four sides to a mortuary, it is otherwise visible in the round, making it one of the most conspicuous architectural debuts to appear in Southern California in a number of years. At the same time, Zellner's design operates in large part as the straightforward and accommodating backdrop for an artwork by the 88-year-old artist Ellsworth Kelly.
REAL ESTATE
July 21, 1985 | Dale Baldwin
Question: We will build a new home on our lot in Cambria, Calif., about a mile from the ocean near the Hearst Castle. Should we use wood siding on the house, stucco or a kind of texture stucco that I understand will not hold moisture or cause moss and mildew to grow in the house and closets? Answer: You're talking about apples and oranges here: the choice of an exterior wall covering--siding or stucco--should be governed by aesthetic considerations, not moisture ones.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989
My parents were in Los Angeles recently and sent me a copy of Leon Whiteson's article (" '20s Spanish Style Needs No Revival," March 5). About a year ago, we moved into a Spanish Colonial home in Omaha. Spanish Colonial exists, but is not a common style here. Our home was designed in 1925 by an Omaha architect and has all of the characteristics you mentioned except the white stucco. I think all of the Spanish Colonial homes we have seen in Omaha are of a dark beige stucco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2008 | David Haldane
A construction worker killed when a backhoe loader tipped over and struck him with its scoop at the Platinum Triangle urban village was identified Friday as Arturo Gonzalez, 34. Gonzalez, of Anaheim, was part of a six-man crew putting stucco on a condominium project in the 1500 block of Katella Avenue when the machine crushed him about 11 a.m. Thursday, authorities said. -- David Haldane
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Researchers in Germany have used a modern medical procedure to uncover a secret within one of ancient Egypt's most treasured artworks: The bust of Nefertiti has two faces. A team led by Dr. Alexander Huppertz, director of the Imaging Science Institute at Berlin's Charite hospital and medical school, discovered a detailed stone carving that differs from the external stucco face when they performed a computed tomography, or CT, scan on the bust. The findings, published Tuesday in the monthly journal Radiology, are the first to show that the stone core of the statue is a highly detailed sculpture of the queen, Huppertz said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998
Re "Judge Is Asked to Block Marines' Housing Project," Dec. 23: What the attorney for the Surfriders Foundation, Tom Davis, is trying to say with his building-in-Yosemite analogy is that places like Trestles are just as important to us coastal folk as geologically flashier places are to the general populace. Trouble is, you have to be from here to understand that, and with non-locals making these decisions, it ends up with the mountains getting protected and us getting covered with beige stucco.
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
A fire believed to have been set by an arsonist swept through a classroom at the Corona Avenue Elementary School in Bell early today, causing $250,000 in damage, officials said. The fire at 3825 Bell Ave. was reported at 1:29 a.m. and was extinguished in 15 minutes, Los Angeles County Fire Department spokeswoman Chris Abreu said. The single-story wood stucco building housed a classroom, a laboratory and a teacher's workroom, said Fannie Humphrey, an assistant principal.
HOME & GARDEN
July 16, 2011 | By Lisa Boone, Los Angeles Times
When Amy Lippman first called her architect about renovating a Carpinteria beach house she had just bought, she tried to find humor in the design challenge ahead by asking: "Do you want to work on a Taco Bell?" The house wasn't really a fast-food drive-through, of course, but a 1977 stucco box with unfortunate architectural flourishes. Lippman's husband, Rodman Flender, thought she was nuts. After viewing the property for the first time, Los Angeles architect Rachel Allen had to agree with her client's initial assessment.
HOME & GARDEN
July 31, 2010 | By Emily Young, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Architect Dennis Gibbens has long loved urban living, with home just steps away from favorite restaurants and shops. So in 2005 he bought a vacant lot on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, where run-down storefronts had been transformed into a vibrant, trendsetting community. His vision: a three-story project with retail at street level and his personal living space on the upper floors. "Abbot Kinney is one of the few pedestrian streets in Los Angeles, and the great thing is it's remained unique with so many independently owned businesses," Gibbens says.
HOME & GARDEN
March 13, 2010 | Emily Young
It all started in 2005, when film producer Mark Gill moved in with screenwriter Hanna Weg and asked, "Honey, can I move the couch?" Little did they know this modest request would lead to a two-year makeover that transformed a nondescript clapboard-and-stucco box to a modern jewel. Weg bought the two-bedroom hillside house in Silver Lake 12 years ago, before she and Gill met and married. She was drawn to it because it felt like a treehouse in the sky, came with a pool and had a separate space below the living quarters that could serve as her office.
HOME & GARDEN
August 15, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Interior designer Ryan Brown has made a career buying ugly-duckling properties, turning them into beauties and selling them for profit. It's a process that he and his business partner, Jeff Lewis, reveal on the Bravo reality series "Flipping Out," which starts its third season Monday. Two years ago, however, the 35-year-old Brown, known as the voice of reason on the show, realized that with the real estate market shaky and his own personal life in transition, it was time to focus less on remodeling for profit and more on getting his own house in order.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Researchers in Germany have used a modern medical procedure to uncover a secret within one of ancient Egypt's most treasured artworks: The bust of Nefertiti has two faces. A team led by Dr. Alexander Huppertz, director of the Imaging Science Institute at Berlin's Charite hospital and medical school, discovered a detailed stone carving that differs from the external stucco face when they performed a computed tomography, or CT, scan on the bust. The findings, published Tuesday in the monthly journal Radiology, are the first to show that the stone core of the statue is a highly detailed sculpture of the queen, Huppertz said.
OPINION
August 11, 2008 | Mark Kendall, Mark Kendall is a writer and editor based in Ontario.
I miss Southern California's old, rock-solid banks. The ones sheathed in enough granite to survive a missile strike. The ones with lobbies decked out with marble and mahogany and statuary to rival an Old World palace. Their ornate trappings brought a sense of splendor to L.A.'s Pop-Tart suburbs. More important, whatever the true state of their balance sheets, their financial-fortress architecture conveyed strength and stability. They were built to last.
REAL ESTATE
May 1, 1988 | JOHN McCAFFERTY, John McCafferty is a Times copy editor. and
There were no catastrophes throughout the remodeling of our Manhattan Beach house, but enough little things went wrong to keep us watchful. Like the water pressure. It was pitifully weak in the front yard. I mentioned it to the contractor, who said he'd "check." I never found out what the trouble was, or if it was related to the hole that got knocked in the new plaster (and badly patched) behind the kitchen plumbing. Somehow, the pressure returned to normal.
REAL ESTATE
January 18, 1998
The Robert Smaus column on the impact of remodeling on his garden ("It's Not Too Late to Build a Careful Bond With Nature," Dec. 7) explained what happened to our side yard garden when we added a bedroom. The azaleas and a hydrangea suffered, and I didn't know what went wrong, since I felt I was really babying them through the remodeling process. So it was the alkaline stucco debris. The bushes have rebounded, though. HEIDI SNIVELY Manhattan Beach Letters must include the writer's name, address and daytime telephone number and should be sent to the Real Estate Editor, Los Angeles Times, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, CA 90053, or faxed to Real Estate Editor at (213)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2008 | David Haldane
A construction worker killed when a backhoe loader tipped over and struck him with its scoop at the Platinum Triangle urban village was identified Friday as Arturo Gonzalez, 34. Gonzalez, of Anaheim, was part of a six-man crew putting stucco on a condominium project in the 1500 block of Katella Avenue when the machine crushed him about 11 a.m. Thursday, authorities said. -- David Haldane
OPINION
April 4, 2007 | Mark Kendall, MARK KENDALL is a freelance writer based in Ontario.
THE 1980S WERE an age of Romanesque glory on the fast-growing edges of Los Angeles, as the onward march of minimalist Mediterranean tract homes restored a sense of order and purpose to suburbia. It was the time of the red-tile sky, when the rows of Spanish-roofed homes seemed to stretch on forever, or at least to Phoenix. All those heavy tiles kept a tight lid on SoCal, symbolically closing out the swinging, incendiary, wood-shake '60s and '70s.
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