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June 4, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
There are a lot of "I'd Rather Be Driving My Studebaker" bumper stickers visible around this northern Indiana city. It's not surprising. This was Studebaker country for 111 years, the home of the longest-lived vehicle company in the world. The first Studebaker wagon was manufactured here in 1852, the last American Studebaker automobile, a 1964 Lark, on Dec. 20, 1963. (The company's Canadian factory continued to make Studebaker automobiles until March, 1966.) Studebaker Street is South Bend's main thoroughfare.
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NEWS
June 4, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
There are a lot of "I'd Rather Be Driving My Studebaker" bumper stickers visible around this northern Indiana city. It's not surprising. This was Studebaker country for 111 years, the home of the longest-lived vehicle company in the world. The first Studebaker wagon was manufactured here in 1852, the last American Studebaker automobile, a 1964 Lark, on Dec. 20, 1963. (The company's Canadian factory continued to make Studebaker automobiles until March, 1966.) Studebaker Street is South Bend's main thoroughfare.
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NEWS
August 14, 1997
Mickey Pallas, 81, a photojournalist and pioneer technician whose work is collected as art. As an orphan in Chicago, Pallas joined a camera club and found his future. Later, as a Studebaker automobile plant worker active in the United Auto Workers and as chairman of the local Anti-Discrimination League, he began photographing union activities and making portraits of workers.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Sweetwater Clyde is 50 years behind the times. He drives a faded white, rusted, beat-up 1937 half-ton Mack truck. He operates the Sweetwater Gold Mine his dad bought in 1933 with the same mining equipment that his father used. "This old mine has been worked continuously since 1862. Never abandoned. A few got rich here. A lot went broke. I've done both, hit it a few times and other times it's been a long time between drinks," recalled Sweetwater Clyde, 77, whose real name is Clyde Foster.
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