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SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 If anyone is the perfect example of being a true student-athlete, it's Westchester senior Nick Hamilton. This summer, he's participating in the UCLA VIPS program that prepares high school students for college. He had a summer reading assignment this weekend, but he's also playing for his travel basketball team. Coming back from a dislocated thumb suffered last month in the Watts Summer Games, the All-City player scored 15 points in his game. He gets all As on his report card, is a team leader for the defending City Section Division I champions, and Coach Ed Azzam would probably rank Hamilton has one of the most competitive, hard-working players he's ever coached.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest - the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Here is what we found at Loyola Marymount: The Seaver School of Science and Engineering at Loyola Marymount is not for the faint of academic heart. But it's where a fair share of Loyola Marymount athletes - 27 of 395 to be exact - focus their studies.
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SPORTS
December 15, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The NFL is lending its public relations muscle to a proposal that would require California student athletes who leave a game after a head injury to get written medical clearance before returning to the field or court. Retired players, including Raiders legends Jim Otto and Fred Biletnikoff and San Francisco 49ers Pro Bowl players Keena Turner and Eric Davis, recounted their own experiences Tuesday to support the measure in Sacramento. Davis told how a blow to the head in a game against the Detroit Lions rendered him temporarily blind in his left eye. Reasoning that he played the left side of the field, and the bad eye was facing the sideline, Davis said he stayed in the game, unaware of the risk he was taking.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Matthew Fleischer, guest blogger
Yet another nail went into the coffin of the NCAA on Wednesday. And for those who genuinely care about the well-being of college athletes, that couldn't be better news. Peter Sung Ohr, a regional National Labor Relations Board official, ruled that scholarship football players at Northwestern University aren't student-athletes, as the NCAA likes to designate them, but rather employees of the school who generate vast sums of money for the institution. Players are compensated for their work via scholarships, and are therefore entitled to unionize.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
University presidents, stepping up their drive to reform college athletics, will vote on tough new eligibility requirements for student athletes today at a meeting of the National Collegiate Athletic Assn.
SPORTS
May 31, 1990
UC San Diego named 12 athletes of the year Wednesday. They are: Mike Bradley, men's soccer; Jason Brown, water polo; Scott Sargent, men's track; Tim Rapp, men's basketball; Brad Thomas, men's swimming; Shannon Quigley, women's track; Christine Behrens, women's tennis; Catherine Capriles, women's swimming; Felicia Faro and Toni Krumme, women's soccer; Diana Klintworth, women's volleyball, and Jefif Paulsen, women's water polo.
SPORTS
April 5, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A day after Olympic champion Janet Evans said she was leaving Stanford because an NCAA rule limiting practice to 20 hours weekly would inhibit her preparation for the 1992 Games, the NCAA said the rule was being misinterpreted. Evans was joined in exodus by Melvin Stewart, 20, the world 200-meter butterfly champion from Tennessee. But the NCAA says the 20-hour rule is being misinterpreted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998 | PETE KNIGHT, Pete Knight is a state senator representing the high desert area
Today 64 men's and women's college basketball teams will be selected to compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Assn.'s championship tournament. This collegiate ritual is affectionately referred to as "March Madness." The two tournaments reflect much of what is good in college athletics today: sportsmanship, school pride, teamwork and the drive to win.
SPORTS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Memphis State University is under investigation by the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. regarding allegations that a student athlete was overpaid for a part-time summer job, a school spokesman said today. The investigation also involves allegations that two student athletes "may have acted contrary to the principles of ethical conduct as laid down in the NCAA bylaws," the university said in a statement.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Chris Feliciano Arnold, guest blogger
The NCAA basketball tournament field is set, and this week an estimated 50 million people will fill out their brackets in a fit of March Madness. Yet almost a year after fans witnessed one of the worst in-game injuries in a generation, college athletes are still fighting for basic healthcare guarantees from the institutions that profit from their sweat and blood. Broken bones come with the territory at high levels of competition, but you know an injury is uniquely awful when the player receives consolatory phone calls from Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant and Michelle Obama.
SPORTS
January 29, 2014 | By Chris Foster
What happened with Mike Moser in Vegas didn't stay in Vegas. What happened was, after a freshman season spent languishing near the end of UCLA's basketball bench, Moser transferred to Nevada Las Vegas and had a breakout first season. The forward averaged 14.0 points and 10.5 rebounds for the Runnin' Rebels as a sophomore in 2011-12, and even though he was slowed by elbow and hip injuries last season, he was a productive reserve, averaging 7.1 points and 6.1 rebounds. But then he decided to move again - this time closer to his family in Portland.
SPORTS
October 18, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Oregon wide receiver Josh Huff tried to celebrate his 22nd birthday with a party, but when NCAA officials heard that he was planning on charging an entrance fee, they apparently shut it down. Huff took to Twitter to complain, claiming that he spent $1,500 on the bash and arguing that he was just trying to make his money back. Huff, a senior, charged that it's unfair for the NCAA to profit off him, yet he can't make enough money to have a little bash. Here's his argument:   So it's okay for the NCAA to make money off of my name and likeness but once I go to charge ppl to get in my party it's a problem?
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 If anyone is the perfect example of being a true student-athlete, it's Westchester senior Nick Hamilton. This summer, he's participating in the UCLA VIPS program that prepares high school students for college. He had a summer reading assignment this weekend, but he's also playing for his travel basketball team. Coming back from a dislocated thumb suffered last month in the Watts Summer Games, the All-City player scored 15 points in his game. He gets all As on his report card, is a team leader for the defending City Section Division I champions, and Coach Ed Azzam would probably rank Hamilton has one of the most competitive, hard-working players he's ever coached.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | By David Wharton
For the last few years, the powers that be in college sports have watched nervously as an antitrust lawsuit wends its way through federal court. O'Bannon vs. NCAA is challenging traditional notions of amateurism, arguing that young athletes should receive more than just scholarships for their role in what has become a multibillion-dollar enterprise. On Thursday, the case arrives at a crucial fork in the road. A Northern California judge must decide if thousands of current and former college players can join as plaintiffs in what would become a class-action suit.
SPORTS
June 3, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
The Pac-12 on Monday announced an initiative to help improve the health and safety of its more than 7,000 athletes. Here's the full press release . The elements of the initiative include  "Head Trauma Task Force" and "Football Contact Reduction. " The Pac-12 will establish a task force to study head trauma and "find ways to limit damage and exposure to  student-athletes. " The football contact initiative will look to study and monitor contact at practice. A final policy will be released at the Pac-12 Football Media Day on July 26. "Pac-12 institutions house the leading medical trainers, doctors, and scientists working to enhance student-athlete health and well-being,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said in the release.
SPORTS
October 18, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Oregon wide receiver Josh Huff tried to celebrate his 22nd birthday with a party, but when NCAA officials heard that he was planning on charging an entrance fee, they apparently shut it down. Huff took to Twitter to complain, claiming that he spent $1,500 on the bash and arguing that he was just trying to make his money back. Huff, a senior, charged that it's unfair for the NCAA to profit off him, yet he can't make enough money to have a little bash. Here's his argument:   So it's okay for the NCAA to make money off of my name and likeness but once I go to charge ppl to get in my party it's a problem?
SPORTS
August 26, 2005 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Matt Leinart could tango with teammates at the Rose Bowl if USC wins a third consecutive national title. The Heisman Trophy winner might perform the Nightclub Two-Step in New York if he wins another. This much is certain: As the Trojans' senior quarterback pursues those milestones on the field this season, he will waltz through the fall semester in the classroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
The gruesome leg injury to University of Louisville basketball player Kevin Ware has one California lawmaker calling for better financial protections for student athletes nationwide. In a letter to the National Collegiate Athletic Assn., state Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima) said the group should at least adopt standards in a new California law. The measure, which took effect Jan. 1, requires universities that make a certain amount of money from television deals to provide the equivalent of academic scholarships to athletes whose injuries result in them losing their athletic scholarships.
SPORTS
November 28, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
There is one word you've been hearing a lot lately to describe the best college football teams in the country. It is a strange word for a sport of violence. It is an odd way to describe our modern gladiators. That word is "smart. " After Notre Dame's victory over USC last weekend, Trojans Coach Lane Kiffin said, "That's a really smart team over there. " Before Stanford's win over UCLA, Bruins Coach Jim Mora said, "They've got some smart kids, and they can handle a lot. " Smart will be leading the Fighting Irish into the national championship game.
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