Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStudent Debt
IN THE NEWS

Student Debt

BUSINESS
August 8, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Tell us your story. Although the economy is perking up, these are tough times for Californians of all ages. Are you a recent college graduate searching for work, a mid-career professional trying to keep your job or a retiree facing financial pressure? Whatever your situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear from you. Tell us how you're handling today's economy and job market. Please email walter.hamilton@latimes.com or shan.li@latimes.com .   ALSO : Many Americans say they can't retire until their 70s or 80s Today's retirees face declining standard of living, study says Student debt is No. 1 fear of college-bound, according to survey
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Share your family's story. Although the economy is improving overall, Californians of all ages are struggling in the job market and with personal finances. In many cases, extended families are stepping in to help. Are you a twentysomething who has moved back home? A fortysomething supporting your children or your aging parents? A sixtysomething who was prematurely pushed out of the workforce? Whatever your age or situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear how your family is pulling together in troubled times.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Students borrowing money for college today are much likelier to default than people who took out loans just a few years ago, according to a new report. The student-loan delinquency rate in the last three years has risen to 15.1%, up from 12.4% from 2005 to 2007, according to FICO Labs, a unit of Fair Isaac Corp., which publishes consumer credit scores. That's a nearly 22% increase. The report is the latest red flag signaling that monstrous debt is a problem not only for students but potentially for the broader economy as well.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. fell 23% last week after the Santa Ana for-profit college chain disclosed that the Securities and Exchange Commission had launched an investigation into the company. Corinthian said it received a subpoena this month from the SEC related to student recruitment, degree completion, job placement, loan defaults and compliance with U.S. Education Department rules, among other issues. The company said in a securities filing it intends to cooperate with the SEC investigation.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | Kathy M. Kristof
Couples in the process of divorce spend a lot of time divvying up their assets. But in today's miserable economy, experts maintain that soon-to-be-exes should take even greater care dividing up the debts. Otherwise, your former spouse's job loss could end up hitting your balance sheet -- and credit report -- years after you think the divorce is settled.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Tim Jones and Jodi S. Cohen, Chicago Tribune
Margo Alpert is on the 30-year plan. Every month, $500 to $600 is automatically deducted from her salary to pay off college loans. By the time the 29-year-old Chicago public interest lawyer is in her mid-50s and thinking seriously about retirement, she will finally be free of college debt. "It's going to be part of my life forever," Alpert said. "I don't think about it at all because it's just a fact of life."
BUSINESS
March 31, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
After graduating from Columbia University in the height of the recession and acquiring $120,000 in debt, including 12 student loans from seven servicers, Brendon McQueen was left with a film degree and a six-month grace period before his first loan repayment was due. Frustrated by the lack of options in tracking and managing his various loans, McQueen, like many other entrepreneurs, took matters into his own hands. “I tried to find a tool out there that offered a comprehensive solution, and I couldn't, so I said, 'Well, let's create one,'” McQueen said.  The solution: Tuition.io , a free one-stop-shop website that consolidates all your student loans -- public or private -- into one interface.
OPINION
May 16, 2013
Re "Cal State grads facing an exit fee," May 14 Give an arm and a leg, and you still have to give up more. College tuition has been on the rise for the last 10 years, and just when a college student believes that the horror is over, many of the Cal State University campuses want students to pay an exit fee. What chutzpah. The average debt load for graduates who borrowed money to pay tuition hovers around $27,000, according to the Institute for College Access and Success' Project on Student Debt.
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Deep in student debt," Opinion, Feb. 10 Sarah Amandolare is troubled by "gapping" - colleges' practice of admitting students without awarding enough financial aid to make a school affordable. The vast majority of the nation's colleges have no other option. Out of thousands of U.S. colleges and universities, fewer than 70 claim they will meet a student's full financial need. Many of these schools have hefty endowment funds. Others use less-generous estimates of what the student can pay, which often means a gap between what the college and the family think is affordable.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Education Department on Thursday issued regulations governing for-profit colleges, a rapidly expanding education sector that has been criticized in Congress for allegedly providing students with poor educations while saddling them with excessive debt. Issued after a year of negotiations, the new regulations are intended to improve the Education Department's ability to monitor the institutions, including compensation for recruiters, and the ability to take action against schools that engage in deceptive advertising and marketing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|