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Student Debt

BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As Americans continue to borrow more to pay for college, many are confused and frustrated at the process of dealing with private student loans. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau disclosed the depth of the problem Wednesday by publishing nearly 2,000 comments from borrowers, advocacy organizations and other agencies. The federal agency removed names and other identifying information from comments. Many were angry with lenders for not making terms and conditions clear, such as how to consolidate a series of loans.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
People in their 40s have the highest student-loan delinquency rate of any age group, according to newly released data. Nearly 12% of people age 40 to 49 have fallen behind on their student-loan payments by 90 days or more, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. While Americans of all ages are struggling with student debt, fortysomethings are the only age bracket burdened with a double-digit delinquency rate. Their 11.9% level compares with 9.1% for people in their 30s, 9.4% for fiftysomethings and 9.5% for those older than 60, according to the Fed . People below age 30 have the lowest delinquency rate -- 6.2% -- theoretically because they're young enough to defer payment of at least some of their loans.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Parents, grandparents and young adults know the problem only too well: Heavy student-debt loads, persistent employment troubles stemming from the recession, plus newly toughened mortgage underwriting standards are all standing in the way of vast numbers of potential first-time home buyers in their 20s and 30s. But are there effective techniques that family members, friends, even employers can use to bridge the generational gap by...
BUSINESS
March 31, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
After graduating from Columbia University in the height of the recession and acquiring $120,000 in debt, including 12 student loans from seven servicers, Brendon McQueen was left with a film degree and a six-month grace period before his first loan repayment was due. Frustrated by the lack of options in tracking and managing his various loans, McQueen, like many other entrepreneurs, took matters into his own hands. “I tried to find a tool out there that offered a comprehensive solution, and I couldn't, so I said, 'Well, let's create one,'” McQueen said.  The solution: Tuition.io , a free one-stop-shop website that consolidates all your student loans -- public or private -- into one interface.
OPINION
May 16, 2013
Re "Cal State grads facing an exit fee," May 14 Give an arm and a leg, and you still have to give up more. College tuition has been on the rise for the last 10 years, and just when a college student believes that the horror is over, many of the Cal State University campuses want students to pay an exit fee. What chutzpah. The average debt load for graduates who borrowed money to pay tuition hovers around $27,000, according to the Institute for College Access and Success' Project on Student Debt.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Stock indexes were initially down nearly 1% in early trading on Wall Street on worries over Spain's banking system, adding to concern over the Eurozone crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average was down 101 points, or 0.8%, to 13,385 shortly after the opening bell. The broader Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 9 points, or 0.6%, to 1,438. The Nasdaq was down 13 points, or 0.4%, to 3,124. Friday is the last trading day of the third quarter. ALSO: Initial jobless claims fell sharply last week to 359,000 Mortgage rates nose-dive to new lows; 30-year at 3.4% One in five households burdened by student debt, a record
BUSINESS
August 8, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Tell us your story. Although the economy is perking up, these are tough times for Californians of all ages. Are you a recent college graduate searching for work, a mid-career professional trying to keep your job or a retiree facing financial pressure? Whatever your situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear from you. Tell us how you're handling today's economy and job market. Please email walter.hamilton@latimes.com or shan.li@latimes.com .   ALSO : Many Americans say they can't retire until their 70s or 80s Today's retirees face declining standard of living, study says Student debt is No. 1 fear of college-bound, according to survey
BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Share your family's story. Although the economy is improving overall, Californians of all ages are struggling in the job market and with personal finances. In many cases, extended families are stepping in to help. Are you a twentysomething who has moved back home? A fortysomething supporting your children or your aging parents? A sixtysomething who was prematurely pushed out of the workforce? Whatever your age or situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear how your family is pulling together in troubled times.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Catherine Ho, Ho is a Times staff writer
Higher college costs and steep losses in college savings plans are forcing students and their parents to borrow more money -- if they can -- to earn bachelor's degrees. Federal officials, fearing that the continuing credit crunch may stymie college financing efforts, tried Saturday to reassure families that funds would be available.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Dozens of students rallied at a meeting of the California State University governing board Wednesday, chanting and hoisting signs that urged the chancellor and trustees to rollback “success fees” that are raising costs on many campuses. More than 100 students marched in front of the police-guarded entrance of the chancellor's Long Beach office shouting, “We got 99 problems and student debt is one,” and “No cuts, no fees, education should be free.” Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting the success fees to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring, counseling and other services.
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