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Student Debt

BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Brenda Small didn't think twice about taking out student loans to pay for nursing school in the late 1980s. She figured she could easily pay off the $20,000 bill - until an injury a few years later left her permanently unable to work. Her dreams of working in her chosen profession vanished, but not her student debts. Including interest and penalties, the 59-year-old Los Angeles woman now owes more than $39,000 and can't afford to pay the debt from a disability income of $1,234 a month.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
More than half of millennials -- 54% -- surveyed by a Wells Fargo & Co. retirement unit said their "biggest financial concern currently" was longer-term debt, mainly student and credit card debt. With the cost of college continuing to rise , about 64% of the 22- to 32-year-olds surveyed said they paid for school with loans. And 42% of the millennials said their debt was "overwhelming," twice the rate of baby boomers who were surveyed for comparison. The $1 trillion in outstanding student debt and low wages in the weak economy are causing the latest rounds of college graduates to put away less money for retirement.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As Americans continue to borrow more to pay for college, many are confused and frustrated at the process of dealing with private student loans. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau disclosed the depth of the problem Wednesday by publishing nearly 2,000 comments from borrowers, advocacy organizations and other agencies. The federal agency removed names and other identifying information from comments. Many were angry with lenders for not making terms and conditions clear, such as how to consolidate a series of loans.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Stock indexes were initially down nearly 1% in early trading on Wall Street on worries over Spain's banking system, adding to concern over the Eurozone crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average was down 101 points, or 0.8%, to 13,385 shortly after the opening bell. The broader Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 9 points, or 0.6%, to 1,438. The Nasdaq was down 13 points, or 0.4%, to 3,124. Friday is the last trading day of the third quarter. ALSO: Initial jobless claims fell sharply last week to 359,000 Mortgage rates nose-dive to new lows; 30-year at 3.4% One in five households burdened by student debt, a record
BUSINESS
August 8, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Tell us your story. Although the economy is perking up, these are tough times for Californians of all ages. Are you a recent college graduate searching for work, a mid-career professional trying to keep your job or a retiree facing financial pressure? Whatever your situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear from you. Tell us how you're handling today's economy and job market. Please email walter.hamilton@latimes.com or shan.li@latimes.com .   ALSO : Many Americans say they can't retire until their 70s or 80s Today's retirees face declining standard of living, study says Student debt is No. 1 fear of college-bound, according to survey
BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Share your family's story. Although the economy is improving overall, Californians of all ages are struggling in the job market and with personal finances. In many cases, extended families are stepping in to help. Are you a twentysomething who has moved back home? A fortysomething supporting your children or your aging parents? A sixtysomething who was prematurely pushed out of the workforce? Whatever your age or situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear how your family is pulling together in troubled times.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. fell 23% last week after the Santa Ana for-profit college chain disclosed that the Securities and Exchange Commission had launched an investigation into the company. Corinthian said it received a subpoena this month from the SEC related to student recruitment, degree completion, job placement, loan defaults and compliance with U.S. Education Department rules, among other issues. The company said in a securities filing it intends to cooperate with the SEC investigation.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Builders are eyeing the next wave of potential home buyers - the so-called millennials - but whether this rising generation will embrace big mortgage debt remains an open question. These 95 million people ages 10 to 32 outnumber their baby-boomer parents by 10 million. The young adults among them, sobered by the recession, have relatively modest material expectations; many say they'd be happy with smaller living spaces. The housing industry will have to convince the next generation that home loans are as necessary and prudent as the student debt so many of them already carry.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Claudia Buck
SACRAMENTO — Two kids, two college tuitions. Add it up: One very big college bill. For John and Ellen Wong of Sacramento and many other parents, paying for college is no trivial expense. With two teenagers heading to campus this fall, the couple's total annual tab is about $66,000. That's roughly Ellen Wong's entire annual salary as a public high school instructor. "We've been saving since they were babies," said Ellen Wong, who said the couple are determined to get their kids through college without relying on student loans.
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Deep in student debt," Opinion, Feb. 10 Sarah Amandolare is troubled by "gapping" - colleges' practice of admitting students without awarding enough financial aid to make a school affordable. The vast majority of the nation's colleges have no other option. Out of thousands of U.S. colleges and universities, fewer than 70 claim they will meet a student's full financial need. Many of these schools have hefty endowment funds. Others use less-generous estimates of what the student can pay, which often means a gap between what the college and the family think is affordable.
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