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Student Debt

NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Tim Jones and Jodi S. Cohen, Chicago Tribune
Margo Alpert is on the 30-year plan. Every month, $500 to $600 is automatically deducted from her salary to pay off college loans. By the time the 29-year-old Chicago public interest lawyer is in her mid-50s and thinking seriously about retirement, she will finally be free of college debt. "It's going to be part of my life forever," Alpert said. "I don't think about it at all because it's just a fact of life."
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BUSINESS
December 29, 2013 | David Lazarus
Teresa Martin was laid off in October from her job as office manager for a packaging company. The Corona resident is now struggling to pay her bills. Martin, 57, isn't carrying any credit card balances at the moment, but she said she may have to start running up debt on plastic in the coming days if she wants to keep a roof over her head. "It's scary," she told me. "But I'm not sure what else I can do. " As we stagger into a new year, consumer debt is climbing at the fastest pace in more than five years.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2013 | By Shan Li
With decades ahead of them in the job market, more than half of millennials stay awake at night chewing over all manner of worries, according to a study. Those 18- to 33-yeas-olds actually stress out more than older generations, the American Psychological Assn. concluded in its new study. Slightly more than 50% said that overwhelming worries disrupted their sleep in the past month. A dour economy is top of mind for young people, with work and job stability sending their stress levels soaring.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | by Walter Hamilton
Families aren't saving enough for college, students are falling deeper into debt and nearly 13% of graduates owe more than $50,000, according to new research. The bottom line of the research, gleaned from a pair of new studies, is that college-debt woes continue to worsen despite all the attention focused on the ballooning debt of America's young people. An analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows that the number of students taking out college loans, and the amount they borrowed, both grew 70%, or roughly 7% a year, from 2004 and 2012.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As Americans continue to borrow more to pay for college, many are confused and frustrated at the process of dealing with private student loans. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau disclosed the depth of the problem Wednesday by publishing nearly 2,000 comments from borrowers, advocacy organizations and other agencies. The federal agency removed names and other identifying information from comments. Many were angry with lenders for not making terms and conditions clear, such as how to consolidate a series of loans.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Education Department on Thursday issued regulations governing for-profit colleges, a rapidly expanding education sector that has been criticized in Congress for allegedly providing students with poor educations while saddling them with excessive debt. Issued after a year of negotiations, the new regulations are intended to improve the Education Department's ability to monitor the institutions, including compensation for recruiters, and the ability to take action against schools that engage in deceptive advertising and marketing.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Catherine Ho, Ho is a Times staff writer
Higher college costs and steep losses in college savings plans are forcing students and their parents to borrow more money -- if they can -- to earn bachelor's degrees. Federal officials, fearing that the continuing credit crunch may stymie college financing efforts, tried Saturday to reassure families that funds would be available.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Got a problem making ends meet each month? There's an easy and cheap way to stick to a budget using envelopes. David Colker, an editor in the Business section at the Los Angeles Times, shows how to do it. This method of budgeting was popular in the Great Depression, and it is coming into vogue again in this tough economy. All you do is take an envelope for each category -- say, one for gas, one for food, one for entertainment, one for rent -- and put your budgeted amount of cash in it for the month.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Americans saw their wealth increase by $1.7 trillion in the third quarter ended in September, a promising sign in the thick of the holiday shopping season. Total household and nonprofit net worth - the difference between the value of assets and liabilities - climbed 2.7% to nearly $64.8 trillion from $63 trillion the previous quarter. A year ago, the gauge was at $58.7 trillion, according to a report Thursday from the Federal Reserve. Households enjoyed a $301 billion bump in the value of their real estate holdings; the value of stock investments increased as well.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Builders are eyeing the next wave of potential home buyers - the so-called millennials - but whether this rising generation will embrace big mortgage debt remains an open question. These 95 million people ages 10 to 32 outnumber their baby-boomer parents by 10 million. The young adults among them, sobered by the recession, have relatively modest material expectations; many say they'd be happy with smaller living spaces. The housing industry will have to convince the next generation that home loans are as necessary and prudent as the student debt so many of them already carry.
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