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Student Debt

BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Students borrowing money for college today are much likelier to default than people who took out loans just a few years ago, according to a new report. The student-loan delinquency rate in the last three years has risen to 15.1%, up from 12.4% from 2005 to 2007, according to FICO Labs, a unit of Fair Isaac Corp., which publishes consumer credit scores. That's a nearly 22% increase. The report is the latest red flag signaling that monstrous debt is a problem not only for students but potentially for the broader economy as well.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Got a problem making ends meet each month? There's an easy and cheap way to stick to a budget using envelopes. David Colker, an editor in the Business section at the Los Angeles Times, shows how to do it. This method of budgeting was popular in the Great Depression, and it is coming into vogue again in this tough economy. All you do is take an envelope for each category -- say, one for gas, one for food, one for entertainment, one for rent -- and put your budgeted amount of cash in it for the month.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Catherine Ho, Ho is a Times staff writer
Higher college costs and steep losses in college savings plans are forcing students and their parents to borrow more money -- if they can -- to earn bachelor's degrees. Federal officials, fearing that the continuing credit crunch may stymie college financing efforts, tried Saturday to reassure families that funds would be available.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Colleague Don Lee wrote a piece in Tuesday's L.A. Times about a new Pew Research Center study, "The Rising Cost of Not Going to College ," that finds getting a college education is still the best path to a financially successful life, the current economy notwithstanding. Of course, no one - especially poll takers, who measure the present and the past - can predict the future. But the Pew findings are pretty compelling, even as they obscure a more significant point: The benefits of a higher education aren't limited to a paycheck.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Ten U.S. colleges and universities have committed to provide more information to students about tuition and other costs, including estimated monthly loan payments after graduation, as part of a federal push to improve disclosure to help prevent financial-aid recipients from overextending themselves, the White House said. Leaders from those institutions, which include the state university systems in Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Texas, were scheduled meet Tuesday in Washington with Vice President Joe Biden, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to discuss financial aid transparency.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Tim Jones and Jodi S. Cohen, Chicago Tribune
Margo Alpert is on the 30-year plan. Every month, $500 to $600 is automatically deducted from her salary to pay off college loans. By the time the 29-year-old Chicago public interest lawyer is in her mid-50s and thinking seriously about retirement, she will finally be free of college debt. "It's going to be part of my life forever," Alpert said. "I don't think about it at all because it's just a fact of life."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In December 2009, Ken Ilgunas went public as a van-dwelling graduate student in a widely circulated essay on Salon. Playing off the 1990's man-living-in-a-van-down-by-the-river sketch from "Saturday Night Live," he confessed that to avoid crushing student debt, he'd been camping out in his van while getting a graduate degree at Duke University. How he came exactly to that juncture -- specifically, a university parking lot -- is explained and explored in "Walden on Wheels," Ilgunas' first book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
College students, faculty and administrators met Wednesday at Cal State Dominguez Hills to express their concerns about President Obama's proposals to make college more affordable. The forum is one of four public sessions held around the country - and the only one in California - for the Obama administration to gather input on the president's recently announced agenda to develop a college rating system.  Dozens attended the forum and spoke to the panel - headlined by U.S. Undersecretary of Education Martha Kanter - expressing their concerns about the reliability and unintended consequences of such a system.  The rating score card, to be launched for the 2015 school year, would be based on such measures as the percentage of low-income students receiving federal Pell grants, average tuition and student debt, graduation and transfer rates.  Other proposals would award more financial aid to students at higher-rated colleges and create incentives for new cost-saving approaches, such as three-year bachelor's degrees and online programs.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | by Walter Hamilton
Families aren't saving enough for college, students are falling deeper into debt and nearly 13% of graduates owe more than $50,000, according to new research. The bottom line of the research, gleaned from a pair of new studies, is that college-debt woes continue to worsen despite all the attention focused on the ballooning debt of America's young people. An analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows that the number of students taking out college loans, and the amount they borrowed, both grew 70%, or roughly 7% a year, from 2004 and 2012.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Education Department on Thursday issued regulations governing for-profit colleges, a rapidly expanding education sector that has been criticized in Congress for allegedly providing students with poor educations while saddling them with excessive debt. Issued after a year of negotiations, the new regulations are intended to improve the Education Department's ability to monitor the institutions, including compensation for recruiters, and the ability to take action against schools that engage in deceptive advertising and marketing.
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