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Student Debt

BUSINESS
September 28, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Stock indexes were initially down nearly 1% in early trading on Wall Street on worries over Spain's banking system, adding to concern over the Eurozone crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average was down 101 points, or 0.8%, to 13,385 shortly after the opening bell. The broader Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 9 points, or 0.6%, to 1,438. The Nasdaq was down 13 points, or 0.4%, to 3,124. Friday is the last trading day of the third quarter. ALSO: Initial jobless claims fell sharply last week to 359,000 Mortgage rates nose-dive to new lows; 30-year at 3.4% One in five households burdened by student debt, a record
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Tell us your story. Although the economy is perking up, these are tough times for Californians of all ages. Are you a recent college graduate searching for work, a mid-career professional trying to keep your job or a retiree facing financial pressure? Whatever your situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear from you. Tell us how you're handling today's economy and job market. Please email walter.hamilton@latimes.com or shan.li@latimes.com .   ALSO : Many Americans say they can't retire until their 70s or 80s Today's retirees face declining standard of living, study says Student debt is No. 1 fear of college-bound, according to survey
BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Share your family's story. Although the economy is improving overall, Californians of all ages are struggling in the job market and with personal finances. In many cases, extended families are stepping in to help. Are you a twentysomething who has moved back home? A fortysomething supporting your children or your aging parents? A sixtysomething who was prematurely pushed out of the workforce? Whatever your age or situation, the Los Angeles Times wants to hear how your family is pulling together in troubled times.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Builders are eyeing the next wave of potential home buyers - the so-called millennials - but whether this rising generation will embrace big mortgage debt remains an open question. These 95 million people ages 10 to 32 outnumber their baby-boomer parents by 10 million. The young adults among them, sobered by the recession, have relatively modest material expectations; many say they'd be happy with smaller living spaces. The housing industry will have to convince the next generation that home loans are as necessary and prudent as the student debt so many of them already carry.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | Kathy M. Kristof
Couples in the process of divorce spend a lot of time divvying up their assets. But in today's miserable economy, experts maintain that soon-to-be-exes should take even greater care dividing up the debts. Otherwise, your former spouse's job loss could end up hitting your balance sheet -- and credit report -- years after you think the divorce is settled.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Tim Jones and Jodi S. Cohen, Chicago Tribune
Margo Alpert is on the 30-year plan. Every month, $500 to $600 is automatically deducted from her salary to pay off college loans. By the time the 29-year-old Chicago public interest lawyer is in her mid-50s and thinking seriously about retirement, she will finally be free of college debt. "It's going to be part of my life forever," Alpert said. "I don't think about it at all because it's just a fact of life."
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Deep in student debt," Opinion, Feb. 10 Sarah Amandolare is troubled by "gapping" - colleges' practice of admitting students without awarding enough financial aid to make a school affordable. The vast majority of the nation's colleges have no other option. Out of thousands of U.S. colleges and universities, fewer than 70 claim they will meet a student's full financial need. Many of these schools have hefty endowment funds. Others use less-generous estimates of what the student can pay, which often means a gap between what the college and the family think is affordable.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | by Walter Hamilton
Families aren't saving enough for college, students are falling deeper into debt and nearly 13% of graduates owe more than $50,000, according to new research. The bottom line of the research, gleaned from a pair of new studies, is that college-debt woes continue to worsen despite all the attention focused on the ballooning debt of America's young people. An analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows that the number of students taking out college loans, and the amount they borrowed, both grew 70%, or roughly 7% a year, from 2004 and 2012.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Education Department on Thursday issued regulations governing for-profit colleges, a rapidly expanding education sector that has been criticized in Congress for allegedly providing students with poor educations while saddling them with excessive debt. Issued after a year of negotiations, the new regulations are intended to improve the Education Department's ability to monitor the institutions, including compensation for recruiters, and the ability to take action against schools that engage in deceptive advertising and marketing.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As Americans continue to borrow more to pay for college, many are confused and frustrated at the process of dealing with private student loans. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau disclosed the depth of the problem Wednesday by publishing nearly 2,000 comments from borrowers, advocacy organizations and other agencies. The federal agency removed names and other identifying information from comments. Many were angry with lenders for not making terms and conditions clear, such as how to consolidate a series of loans.
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