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Student Debt

BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Students borrowing money for college today are much likelier to default than people who took out loans just a few years ago, according to a new report. The student-loan delinquency rate in the last three years has risen to 15.1%, up from 12.4% from 2005 to 2007, according to FICO Labs, a unit of Fair Isaac Corp., which publishes consumer credit scores. That's a nearly 22% increase. The report is the latest red flag signaling that monstrous debt is a problem not only for students but potentially for the broader economy as well.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Ten U.S. colleges and universities have committed to provide more information to students about tuition and other costs, including estimated monthly loan payments after graduation, as part of a federal push to improve disclosure to help prevent financial-aid recipients from overextending themselves, the White House said. Leaders from those institutions, which include the state university systems in Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Texas, were scheduled meet Tuesday in Washington with Vice President Joe Biden, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to discuss financial aid transparency.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Tim Jones and Jodi S. Cohen, Chicago Tribune
Margo Alpert is on the 30-year plan. Every month, $500 to $600 is automatically deducted from her salary to pay off college loans. By the time the 29-year-old Chicago public interest lawyer is in her mid-50s and thinking seriously about retirement, she will finally be free of college debt. "It's going to be part of my life forever," Alpert said. "I don't think about it at all because it's just a fact of life."
OPINION
May 16, 2013
Re "Cal State grads facing an exit fee," May 14 Give an arm and a leg, and you still have to give up more. College tuition has been on the rise for the last 10 years, and just when a college student believes that the horror is over, many of the Cal State University campuses want students to pay an exit fee. What chutzpah. The average debt load for graduates who borrowed money to pay tuition hovers around $27,000, according to the Institute for College Access and Success' Project on Student Debt.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2013 | By Shan Li
With decades ahead of them in the job market, more than half of millennials stay awake at night chewing over all manner of worries, according to a study. Those 18- to 33-yeas-olds actually stress out more than older generations, the American Psychological Assn. concluded in its new study. Slightly more than 50% said that overwhelming worries disrupted their sleep in the past month. A dour economy is top of mind for young people, with work and job stability sending their stress levels soaring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
College students, faculty and administrators met Wednesday at Cal State Dominguez Hills to express their concerns about President Obama's proposals to make college more affordable. The forum is one of four public sessions held around the country - and the only one in California - for the Obama administration to gather input on the president's recently announced agenda to develop a college rating system.  Dozens attended the forum and spoke to the panel - headlined by U.S. Undersecretary of Education Martha Kanter - expressing their concerns about the reliability and unintended consequences of such a system.  The rating score card, to be launched for the 2015 school year, would be based on such measures as the percentage of low-income students receiving federal Pell grants, average tuition and student debt, graduation and transfer rates.  Other proposals would award more financial aid to students at higher-rated colleges and create incentives for new cost-saving approaches, such as three-year bachelor's degrees and online programs.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Students who get the runaround from companies handling their college loans soon may get help from the federal government. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said it will begin regulating the nation's largest student-loan servicing firms, which manage student accounts, process monthly payments and respond to borrower questions. Though they don't make the loans, the companies are the main point of contact for borrowers. They effectively serve as gatekeepers that have enormous influence over requests for deferments or loan modifications.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Education Department on Thursday issued regulations governing for-profit colleges, a rapidly expanding education sector that has been criticized in Congress for allegedly providing students with poor educations while saddling them with excessive debt. Issued after a year of negotiations, the new regulations are intended to improve the Education Department's ability to monitor the institutions, including compensation for recruiters, and the ability to take action against schools that engage in deceptive advertising and marketing.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As Americans continue to borrow more to pay for college, many are confused and frustrated at the process of dealing with private student loans. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau disclosed the depth of the problem Wednesday by publishing nearly 2,000 comments from borrowers, advocacy organizations and other agencies. The federal agency removed names and other identifying information from comments. Many were angry with lenders for not making terms and conditions clear, such as how to consolidate a series of loans.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2013 | By Shan Li
Tell The Times how your family is dealing with the current job market. Although the economy is slowly picking up, Californians of all ages are struggling with their employment situations and their finances. In many cases, family members are stepping in to help. Are you a twentysomething who is working multiple part-time jobs and living with your parents? A fortysomething supporting your parents or children? A sixtysomething who is facing depleted retirement savings and looking for work?
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