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Student Fees

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OPINION
March 29, 1992
Gov. Pete Wilson won't raise taxes but he raises student fees 40% (March 19). He wants our children to pay now, not later. DOUGLAS INGOLDSBY, Santa Barbara
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
They are called "student success fees" and they offer the promise of more classes and programs and improved graduation rates for thousands of California State University students. But critics say they are a thinly veiled attempt to shift more education costs to students - without increasing tuition. Campuses in Fullerton, Dominguez Hills, Fresno and San Diego all are considering these charges, ranging from $200 to $500 per semester. If approved, those Cal State campuses will join others in the East Bay, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona, San Bernardino, San Jose, San Luis Obispo and San Marcos, which already are charging such fees.
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OPINION
September 27, 2010
California must make community college more affordable by raising student fees. Seriously. In the second round of federal stimulus money for higher education, California's community colleges received $5 million this month. That's nice, but not half as much as they would have gotten if they'd raised fees by a mere $1 a unit from the current $26. For the average full-time student, that would amount to a total increase of perhaps $30 a year; it would have boosted the colleges' budget by $12.5 million.
OPINION
June 14, 2013
Re "Community college stopgap," Editorial, June 11 Setting up a two-tiered fee system in our community colleges would fundamentally shift the responsibility for funding increased access to colleges from the state to students. AB 955 would create a toll lane that gives students who can afford to pay about $200 a unit - rather than current fee of $46 - access to courses that lower-income students cannot. Fee waivers granted to our neediest students could not be applied to these pricier courses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2010 | By Jack Dolan
UCLA officials have decided not to use all of the $25 million in student fees that they were planning to spend on a $185-million renovation of Pauley Pavilion, home of the school's legendary basketball team. Vice Chancellor Steven A. Olsen said in a letter to The Times that $15 million of the student funds would go to other uses. The letter followed a Sunday article detailing how, in a time of crippling budget cuts, administrators throughout the state have tapped funds meant for classrooms and student services to help pay for ill-timed land deals, loans to high-ranking officials and, at UCLA, the Pauley renovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2010 | By Jack Dolan
While California universities have faced round after round of crippling budget cuts and protests against increased fees have flared on campuses, administrators have tapped funds meant for classrooms and students to cover some extraordinary costs: losses on ill-timed real estate deals, loans to high-ranking officials and an ambitious construction project. Experts say the moves, made without wide student knowledge or public oversight, show that administrators have put aggressive business plans ahead of the teaching mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2009 | Gale Holland
California State University trustees Wednesday approved a 10% increase in undergraduate and graduate student fees for the coming school year, with one board member saying it was the only way to absorb deep funding cuts without turning away thousands of students and eliminating teaching posts. "Until California changes its priorities . . . we only have bad choices," Board of Trustees Chairman Jeffrey Bleich said before the 17-2 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2010 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Ending a decades-long tradition, the California State University plans to start using the word "tuition" instead of "fees" to refer to the educational costs it charges to students. The move marks a fundamental philosophical shift in the ideal of offering Californians a tuition-free public college education, a principle enshrined in the state's master plan for higher education adopted 50 years ago. California students have long paid fees for specialized or optional services such as health, housing and recreation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | Gale Holland
In a first concrete look at how California's fiscal crisis may dramatically reshape higher education in the state, California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed said Tuesday that he will ask the university's trustees to approve an additional student fee hike of 15% to 20% for this fall, and enrollment reductions of 32,000 students in the year to follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The California Post-Secondary Education Commission on Thursday called for a five-year freeze on student fees at the state's public colleges and universities. "For far too long, increases in student fees have been the answer whenever the state finds itself in financial trouble," Howard Welinsky, chair of the commission, said in a statement. During the state's recent budget crisis, fees went up for four straight years in the California State University and University of California systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Before many Cal State seniors walk across the stage to receive a diploma in coming weeks, they will have to break out their wallet at least once more. More than half of Cal State universities charge a commencement fee - a requirement to graduate. At San Diego State, students must fork over $55 before they don the cap and gown. At San Francisco State, it takes $100 to walk across the stage before thousands of spectators. Fifteen of Cal State's 23 campuses charge some sort of graduation fee, according to the Oakland Tribune, which first reported on the charges Monday.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Karin Klein
If there was one thing you could count on Mark G. Yudof to stand for, it was the academic quality of the University of California, the system he has led for close to five years. Yudof, 68, announced Friday that he was stepping down as UC president, citing health problems, including gall bladder surgery. He couldn't be blamed if he also would like to avoid the major headaches of Gov. Jerry Brown's proposals to link future funding increases for UC to a variety of reforms, including less research and publication by professors (who would pick up heavier teaching loads)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California's two public university systems retreated from various tuition hikes as Gov. Jerry Brown suggested the moves would be ill-timed coming just a week after voters approved a tax increase for education. California State University trustees postponed action Tuesday on a plan to impose new student fees and University of California regents also agreed to shelve a proposal, scheduled for a vote Wednesday, to add supplemental fees to some professional degree programs. Cal State's "incentive" fees were designed to encourage students to graduate more quickly, freeing space for new students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. filed a lawsuit Thursday against a California State University campus, accusing the institution of illegally using taxpayer resources to promote Gov. Jerry Brown's push for a ballot measure that would raise taxes. The lawsuit comes amid a running dispute between anti-tax activists and the Cal State system over how far university officials can go in encouraging students to vote for Proposition 30. Brown has said that if the measure fails, the two public university systems will have their funds cut by $250 million each.
OPINION
June 3, 2012
Re "Mogul's child gets full ride at UCLA," June 1 Although I am helping my daughter pay off student loans, I resent the attention being given to Justin Coombs' athletic scholarship to UCLA. The UC system needs the money, but are we really so morally poor that we no longer recognize the distinction associated with receiving a scholarship? Do you really think this young man put the effort into sports because he needed the money to attend college? To make him justify being given the award based on the money diminishes the accolade he is receiving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Jack Scott, a veteran and popular educator who has headed the state's community college system during a period of brutal budget cuts and was often a voice decrying the impact on students, announced Tuesday that he will retire as chancellor overseeing the 112 campuses. Scott, 78, became chancellor of the nation's largest community college system in January 2009 after a long career as a state legislator and college campus leader, giving him rare insights into both politics and academia.
NEWS
March 4, 1997
Announcing the first of several anticipated bills to keep down the cost of attending public colleges, Lt. Gov. Gray Davis on Monday proposed freezing student fees until the year 2000 and then limiting future increases to the growth in personal income. The legislation, Davis said, could bring relief to lower- and middle-class students who suffered "sticker shock" in the early 1990s, when California State University fees more than doubled and University of California fees jumped 134%.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Trustees of the California State University system Friday increased most student fees 10% as a result of the tight state budget and warned that cutbacks in class schedules, library hours and maintenance at the 20 campuses are likely over the next few months. "It will result in considerable deterioration in the quality of programs," acting Chancellor Ellis E. McCune said of the impending austerity measures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
The state is investigating whether Orange County political leaders will be breaking the law if they go forward with their plan to take $73.5 million in tax dollars that are supposed to go to local schools. County officials said they have no choice but to redirect the money in January and again in May to balance the county's budget and pay its bills. Without the tax dollars, the county might be forced to lay off hundreds of workers, close jails and cut care for indigent patients, said Bill Campbell, chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
SPORTS
October 15, 2011 | By David Wharton and Baxter Holmes
The clock is ticking, less than a year until the Pacific 12 Conference starts collecting on its historic $3-billion television contract. The largest broadcast deal ever negotiated by a college league, it will pour hundreds of millions into the member schools annually. And it cannot come a moment too soon. A sluggish economy has left athletic departments across the Pac-12 scrambling to cover costs, and some barely afloat, according to records acquired by The Times. Cash-strapped programs at California, Arizona State and Oregon State needed "allocated revenues" to balance their budgets last year.
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