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WORLD
September 25, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - No one knows exactly why Aleph Jimenez Dominguez, an Ensenada activist, disappeared last week. In Mexico, people disappear all the time, for all sorts of reasons. Sometimes it's difficult to get anyone to pay attention. But the Jimenez case has been different. The 32-year-old Jimenez is a spokesman for the Yo Soy 132 student movement that has spearheaded the peaceful, if raucous, protests against President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto and his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, whom the group accuses of cheating their way to victory in July's elections.
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WORLD
March 23, 2014 | By Cindy Chang, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- As students occupied Taiwan's legislative chamber Sunday for a sixth day to protest a free-trade agreement with China, President Ma Ying-jeou denounced the takeover as a threat to democracy. Government officials have pledged not to use force to remove the protesters, who fear the agreement will hurt Taiwan's small businesses and give China too much influence. [Updated at 3:45 p.m., March 23: While the standoff continued at the legislature, a group broke into the government's main executive building Sunday night, reaching Premier Jiang Yi-huah's office.
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WORLD
August 13, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Here they were again, marching through the dark and the rain - the preppies from private universities, the hipsters in fat-lace skater sneakers, the young intellectuals with faces framed in wispy Che Guevara beards, the regular kids with backpacks and smartphones. They pooled by the thousands on Avenida Chapultepec in front of the headquarters ofMexico'smost powerful broadcaster, brandishing signs and banners, trailed by an opportunistic band of hot dog and taco vendors.
WORLD
September 25, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - No one knows exactly why Aleph Jimenez Dominguez, an Ensenada activist, disappeared last week. In Mexico, people disappear all the time, for all sorts of reasons. Sometimes it's difficult to get anyone to pay attention. But the Jimenez case has been different. The 32-year-old Jimenez is a spokesman for the Yo Soy 132 student movement that has spearheaded the peaceful, if raucous, protests against President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto and his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, whom the group accuses of cheating their way to victory in July's elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989
A coalition of Southern California groups supporting the democratic movement in China said it is expecting 10,000 people for a Los Angeles rally and march to the Chinese consulate Sunday afternoon. Monterey Park City Councilwoman Judy Chu, Chinese journalist Chang Qing Cao and two Chinese students at UCLA will be among the speakers. Sue Fan, one of the organizers of the Peace March Organizing Committee of Southern California, said Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Hong Kong stock market plunged more than 10% today in panic trading linked to the political crisis sweeping neighboring China. The pro-democracy demonstrations reached Hong Kong on Sunday as a million people marched on the streets in support of student protesters in Beijing. The British colony, noted for its freewheeling capitalism, reverts to China's control in 1997 and investors fear a repressive reaction to the student movement. The key Hang Seng Index ended down 339.06, or 10.8%, at 2806.
OPINION
February 13, 2000 | RAYMUNDO RIVA PALACIO, Raymundo Riva Palacio is the editor of the daily newspaper Milenio
Don't get confused. There is no comparison between the Mexican student movement in 1968 and the 10-month strike at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that ended last Sunday when the federal police recovered the campus. Sunday, the police operation was clean and left no victims. On Oct. 2, 1968, dozens were killed in Tlatelolco square. In 1968, the order to send soldiers to end the students' protest came from one person only--an authoritarian president named Gustavo Diaz Ordaz.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
At 20, Shen Tong is already an outlaw in the eyes of the Chinese government, which has posted his name on a list of 21 students wanted for activities in the pro-democracy movement. The lanky, self-assured Shen, who escaped China and arrived in the United States on June 11, said Friday that while he fears for his safety, he intends to continue fighting for democracy in his homeland. "We have to try our best," he said. "This movement is still a movement."
OPINION
September 16, 1990 | Charles A. Kupchan, Charles A. Kupchan is an assistant professor of politics at Princeton University
I had last been at the Shanghai Airport in 1979. Not much has changed. The baggage claim area is dark and dingy. Young men in military uniforms wander about arguing, having nothing else to do. As soon as I left the airport, however, I began to see China had changed dramatically. Unimaginable numbers of people still clog the streets. But the depressing conformity conveyed by the sea of blue and grey Mao jackets has given way to a buoyant stream of color and fashion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1988 | CHOI SUNG-IL, Choi Sung-Il is the executive director of the Council for Democracy in Korea, based in Reston, Va
South Korea today has the first popularly elected president in nearly two decades and a National Assembly dominated by the opposition parties for the first time in its history. Meanwhile, student protests and anti-Americanism show no signs of receding under the new banner of reunification. Although generally viewed as replacing democracy as the new goal of protest politics, reunification represents a tactical shift. Several factors are at work here.
WORLD
August 13, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Here they were again, marching through the dark and the rain - the preppies from private universities, the hipsters in fat-lace skater sneakers, the young intellectuals with faces framed in wispy Che Guevara beards, the regular kids with backpacks and smartphones. They pooled by the thousands on Avenida Chapultepec in front of the headquarters ofMexico'smost powerful broadcaster, brandishing signs and banners, trailed by an opportunistic band of hot dog and taco vendors.
OPINION
July 6, 2012 | By Pamela K. Starr
Enrique Peña Nieto, the fresh-faced politician Mexicans elected this week to be their president, represents the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which completely dominated Mexican politics for 71 years until 2000. Many Mexicans are concerned that the PRI's return will lead to a restoration of autocratic rule, an officially sanctioned detente with organized crime or a marked deterioration in bilateral cooperation. But these things are unlikely. Equally unlikely, however, is any kind of wide-ranging reform.
OPINION
June 24, 2012 | By Guillermo Trejo
The rise of a social media-based student movement is shaking up Mexico's July 1 presidential race. This is happening just as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI - which ruled for seven decades until its defeat in 2000 - seems poised to return to power. The movement, led by students from the country's leading private universities in Mexico City, aims to prevent the return of a PRI government and to democratize the mass media. Spreading rapidly throughout the country since May, it already has had a measurable impact, particularly among young voters and independents who represent 30% and 42% of the electorate, respectively.
WORLD
December 23, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
He's been out for months now, but it is never very far from his mind. It can't be. Section 209 of Evin prison has invaded his soul. Babak Zamanian has been transformed from one of Iran's most outspoken students into one of its walking dead. He's among thousands of political activists and journalists free on bail, but banned from leaving the country. He lives with the possibility of being tossed back into prison at any time. His life is in limbo.
WORLD
June 21, 2003 | Azadeh Moaveni, Times Staff Writer
Abdollah Momeni is a student on the run. The university activist began challenging Iran's Islamic regime seven years ago, and since then he has seen peers get arrested, jailed -- and even risk their lives to fight the system. Last fall, he spent a night in police custody so harrowing that he considered abandoning his activism altogether. Now, as the clerical regime tries to round up student leaders in the wake of days of violent unrest, Momeni is a target.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an accomplishment that Hungarian-born financier George Soros doesn't flaunt. Bragging about it, after all, could just make his global democracy-building mission more difficult. But the multibillionaire philanthropist quietly played a key role in the dramatic overthrow last year of President Slobodan Milosevic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | AMY PYLE and SIMON ROMERO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The student walkouts that have disrupted schools in Los Angeles in recent weeks have their roots in a televised speech by Gov. Pete Wilson last spring that offended Angel Cervantes. Cervantes did not like the governor's tough stance against illegal immigrants, and now the 22-year-old graduate student finds himself a somewhat reluctant leader of efforts to channel youthful energy against Proposition 187, the Wilson-backed measure that would deny public services to illegal immigrants.
OPINION
June 24, 2012 | By Guillermo Trejo
The rise of a social media-based student movement is shaking up Mexico's July 1 presidential race. This is happening just as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI - which ruled for seven decades until its defeat in 2000 - seems poised to return to power. The movement, led by students from the country's leading private universities in Mexico City, aims to prevent the return of a PRI government and to democratize the mass media. Spreading rapidly throughout the country since May, it already has had a measurable impact, particularly among young voters and independents who represent 30% and 42% of the electorate, respectively.
OPINION
April 23, 2000 | Robert L. Borosage, Robert L. Borosage is a founder of the Campaign for America's Future
Kids today can't get any respect. First, their generation was described as apathetic, stirred only by dreams of dot-com fortunes. Then, when students stunned the world by joining turtle lovers and Teamsters to shut down the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle last December, they were disparaged as "flat-Earth advocates."
OPINION
February 13, 2000 | RAYMUNDO RIVA PALACIO, Raymundo Riva Palacio is the editor of the daily newspaper Milenio
Don't get confused. There is no comparison between the Mexican student movement in 1968 and the 10-month strike at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that ended last Sunday when the federal police recovered the campus. Sunday, the police operation was clean and left no victims. On Oct. 2, 1968, dozens were killed in Tlatelolco square. In 1968, the order to send soldiers to end the students' protest came from one person only--an authoritarian president named Gustavo Diaz Ordaz.
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