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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
After a four-week delay, the Valley Star student newspaper has returned to Valley College newsstands, and new faculty newspaper advisor Joan Stuller vows that the paper will be distributed at least biweekly, according to her mentor Jack Sterk. Sterk attributed the delay and shift from publishing weekly to reduced staffing. The Star staff, usually 20 students, has dwindled to less than 10.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
The longtime campus newspaper at UC Irvine may be forced to cease printing in the next year if students fail to approved a quarterly fee to help sustain the weekly publication. Like newspapers across the country, rising printing costs have forced UCI's weekly New University to cut back, according to the paper's student editor. Once a robust 60-page newspaper, the paper has shrunk to 24 pages in the last six years and editorsĀ  have had their compensation chopped in half, now earning between $24 and $50 a week.
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NEWS
May 2, 1991
Two area colleges have won high marks for their student newspapers. A special edition on the outbreak of the Persian Gulf War helped the Long Beach City College Viking win first place in general excellence at the recent annual state conference of the Journalism Assn. of Community Colleges, a group of about 80 community colleges in California and Arizona. Contest judges also praised the paper's overall coverage of campus news and politics. Five staff members won individual honors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
As they do on many Saturday afternoons, the teenagers from across Los Angeles county descended on the nondescript Fairfax district office building. It was time for the weekly editorial meeting at L.A.Youth the newspaper by teens for teens. The latest issue had just hit the hallways of L.A. schools, and the deadline for the next one was fast approaching. As more than a dozen students sat around a square of folding tables, Amanda Riddle, one of the adult editors, kicked things off with a question: What did they know about Trayvon Martin?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988
I am an attorney in practice now for more than eight years and I am a member of the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court. I can understand the high court's rationale in holding that "educators do not offend the First Amendment by exercising editorial control" in school newspapers in certain circumstances. Nevertheless, I am morally offended by the hypocrisy of a school that, on the one hand, teaches constitutional rights, including free speech, and on the other hand, censors students' well-intentioned work product and limits their access to relevant and timely information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Pacific Palisades high school teacher who was falsely described as a porn star in a student publication filed a lawsuit Thursday against the Los Angeles Unified School District. Janis Adams, who did not return to Pacific Palisades Charter High School after students circulated the newspaper on the campus last spring, alleges in the suit that the district failed to protect her from sexual harassment by students.
NEWS
November 6, 1986 | JULIO MORAN, Times Staff Writer
The student newspaper at California State University, Dominguez Hills, this week joined at least 10 other student newspapers in the Cal State system in defying a policy that prohibits them from endorsing political candidates. The Dominguez Weekly came out on Tuesday--a day earlier than usual--with an unsigned endorsement of U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston.
OPINION
August 18, 2008
The blog era (or is it the post-blog era?) has already made it harder to believe H.L. Mencken's old saw that freedom of the press is limited to those who own one. Now a bill awaiting Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's signature may further weaken the once-mighty grip of an important class of publishers: high school and college administrators. The "Journalism Teacher Protection Act" sponsored by state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) would make it harder for school administrators to retaliate against faculty advisors on student newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER
A 19-year-old former UC Irvine student suspected of threatening Asian students via the Internet two weeks ago apparently also delivered a death threat to the school newspaper staff last year, university police said Tuesday. The former student, whose name is being withheld, sent a computer message to the staff of the New University in November 1995 saying they were "all going to die," university police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
If a student dared to use the word "reveal" in a story, Alhambra High School journalism teacher Ted Tajima would wield his red pencil and boom in his eloquent baritone, "Only God reveals. " To his students, he was "T" or "Mr. T," a man of inspiration and exacting standards. He spent his entire teaching career at the school, from 1948 to 1983, and under his tutelage the student newspaper had a decades-long run as one of the best in the country. Tajima died Feb. 20 at his Altadena home of complications from emphysema, said his daughter, Elaine Tajima Johnston.
OPINION
August 18, 2008
The blog era (or is it the post-blog era?) has already made it harder to believe H.L. Mencken's old saw that freedom of the press is limited to those who own one. Now a bill awaiting Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's signature may further weaken the once-mighty grip of an important class of publishers: high school and college administrators. The "Journalism Teacher Protection Act" sponsored by state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) would make it harder for school administrators to retaliate against faculty advisors on student newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 2,000 copies -- virtually the entire press run -- of Chapman University's student newspaper, the Panther, were stolen from racks around the campus, authorities said Thursday. "This act served to deprive the campus community of the right to read the weekly newspaper that students pay for and the ... newspaper staff work[s] very hard to produce," Joseph Kertes, the university's vice president and dean of students, said in a written statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
Eighteen college newspapers around the country published a joint editorial Tuesday denouncing a decision by USC administrators that prevented the editor of the Daily Trojan from keeping his job for the spring term. The editorial said the student journalists were troubled by USC's recent decision to reject Zach Fox's application to retain the editor's position, after a dispute with administrators over his efforts to reorganize the paper's staff and obtain its financial records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2006 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Carson High School pulled this month's school newspaper because of an anonymous article that likened rowdy black students at a nearby Taco Bell to "a pack of monkeys." The article, titled "Looks like the circus is in town," was on the editorial page of the issue distributed Tuesday, school officials said. The piece describes raucous and impolite behavior: "The one thing that I hate more than anything is standing in that line with dumb-ass people paying and acting a fool around me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Without debate, the state Senate on Thursday sent Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger a bill that would make California the first state to prohibit college and university administrators from censoring student newspapers. Sen. Debra Bowen (D-Marina del Rey) said the bill would give college journalists the same free-press rights as high school reporters and their professional colleagues. Schwarzenegger has not taken a position on the measure, a spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2005 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
It was presented as good news. In front of a group of student leaders at Alhambra High School, Assistant Principal Grace Love spoke in February about the school's recent gains on state tests. Alhambra, she said, had narrowed the gap in test scores between Asian and Latino students. Overall, Latino test takers had improved their composite scores on state tests faster than any other group over the last four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2005 | Rachana Rathi, Times Staff Writer
Two days before the Claremont High School newspaper went to press, reporters received the confirmation they had been seeking for weeks: A 23-year-old Stanford graduate had posed as a student the previous spring. The Wolfpacket broke the story of Jeremy Iversen.
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