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Student Retention

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NEWS
February 20, 1992
Pasadena City College has received a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to improve fund-raising methods and student retention. The grant will fund a program to provide advice and remedial instruction for new students. It also will be used to improve fund-raising techniques. The Alumni Assn. will be strengthened, and instructors will be trained to research and write applications for private grants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
A warning to Los Angeles Mission College to correct a number of academic and administrative deficiencies didn't come as a great surprise to Daniel Campos. The former student body president had long been frustrated with campus infighting, perceptions of cultural insensitivity and inadequate counseling and other student services. All of these issues and others were cited recently by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges when it put the Sylmar campus on notice that it must make improvements.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989
Rancho Santiago College staffers are figuratively busting their buttons to show their pride in the students. Staff members of the community college in recent days have been wearing buttons that say, "We're Glad You're Here." Grace Mitchell, vice chancellor of student affairs and community services, said the idea is to make students realize how much they are appreciated. "One of the big issues in student retention is making a 'fit' between the student and the institution," Mitchell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Despite efforts to end the practice of social promotion, the Los Angeles Unified School District advanced an overwhelming percentage of its lowest-performing students this year, new data show. The figures indicate that larger numbers of students than anyone expected are advancing to the next grade woefully unprepared. The data show that 81% of last year's second-graders and 98% of eighth-graders who scored in the bottom quarter of the Stanford 9 exam were promoted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | RANDY ROSS, Randy Ross is vice president of the Los Angeles Annenberg Metropolitan Project (LAAMP)
Low standards do cheat students, but a motion set to be heard today by the Los Angeles Unifed School District board misses the mark. Board member David Tokofsky's motion seeks to retain any second- or eighth-grade student whose Stanford 9 reading score is ranked at the lowest 5% nationally (that is, below the fifth percentile). Closer inspection reveals that a fifth-percentile threshold for student retention is both too low and too high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
A warning to Los Angeles Mission College to correct a number of academic and administrative deficiencies didn't come as a great surprise to Daniel Campos. The former student body president had long been frustrated with campus infighting, perceptions of cultural insensitivity and inadequate counseling and other student services. All of these issues and others were cited recently by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges when it put the Sylmar campus on notice that it must make improvements.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | DOUG SMITH and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Senior Los Angeles school officials said they have further scaled back once ambitious plans to end social promotion this year by declaring that English will be the only subject considered, and only students with an F will be held back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denise Davison's son graduated from a La Palma elementary school Wednesday. Time for joy and celebration--except that he's one of twin sons, and the other won't be going to junior high with him. Hers is an extreme example of how a new policy of holding back failing students is affecting families. After a year of warnings and the looming possibility of repeating a grade, students and their families are finally facing the painful word about who's moving ahead and who's staying behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6,300 second- and eighth-graders are repeating their grades this year as part of the Los Angeles school district's new effort to end social promotion, about half the number originally projected, administrators announced Monday. Last spring, the district identified 13,500 students who were failing English, or reading, and at risk of repeating if they did not show significant improvement. With the start of the traditional school year two weeks ago, that number dropped to 6,350.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Despite efforts to end the practice of social promotion, the Los Angeles Unified School District advanced an overwhelming percentage of its lowest-performing students this year, new data show. The figures indicate that larger numbers of students than anyone expected are advancing to the next grade woefully unprepared. The data show that 81% of last year's second-graders and 98% of eighth-graders who scored in the bottom quarter of the Stanford 9 exam were promoted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | RANDY ROSS, Randy Ross is vice president of the Los Angeles Annenberg Metropolitan Project (LAAMP)
Low standards do cheat students, but a motion set to be heard today by the Los Angeles Unifed School District board misses the mark. Board member David Tokofsky's motion seeks to retain any second- or eighth-grade student whose Stanford 9 reading score is ranked at the lowest 5% nationally (that is, below the fifth percentile). Closer inspection reveals that a fifth-percentile threshold for student retention is both too low and too high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6,300 second- and eighth-graders are repeating their grades this year as part of the Los Angeles school district's new effort to end social promotion, about half the number originally projected, administrators announced Monday. Last spring, the district identified 13,500 students who were failing English, or reading, and at risk of repeating if they did not show significant improvement. With the start of the traditional school year two weeks ago, that number dropped to 6,350.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As children across Orange County stream back to school next week, a new state law banning social promotion will force at least 5,060 students to return to the same grade--far more than ever before. Disturbed that too many California students were reaching high school without basic reading and math skills, state lawmakers in 1998 forced local school districts to draft new policies to end social promotion in the second through eighth grades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denise Davison's son graduated from a La Palma elementary school Wednesday. Time for joy and celebration--except that he's one of twin sons, and the other won't be going to junior high with him. Hers is an extreme example of how a new policy of holding back failing students is affecting families. After a year of warnings and the looming possibility of repeating a grade, students and their families are finally facing the painful word about who's moving ahead and who's staying behind.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | DOUG SMITH and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Senior Los Angeles school officials said they have further scaled back once ambitious plans to end social promotion this year by declaring that English will be the only subject considered, and only students with an F will be held back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parents of about 4,700 elementary and middle school students in the Garden Grove Unified School District have received notice that their children are in danger of being held back. New state laws passed this year are requiring schools to develop new criteria for grade promotion in an attempt to reduce retention and curb the practice of social promotion--passing a student who should be held back because of poor performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parents of about 4,700 elementary and middle school students in the Garden Grove Unified School District have received notice that their children are in danger of being held back. New state laws passed this year are requiring schools to develop new criteria for grade promotion in an attempt to reduce retention and curb the practice of social promotion--passing a student who should be held back because of poor performance.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As children across Orange County stream back to school next week, a new state law banning social promotion will force at least 5,060 students to return to the same grade--far more than ever before. Disturbed that too many California students were reaching high school without basic reading and math skills, state lawmakers in 1998 forced local school districts to draft new policies to end social promotion in the second through eighth grades.
NEWS
February 20, 1992
Pasadena City College has received a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to improve fund-raising methods and student retention. The grant will fund a program to provide advice and remedial instruction for new students. It also will be used to improve fund-raising techniques. The Alumni Assn. will be strengthened, and instructors will be trained to research and write applications for private grants.
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