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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993
Mr. Larry Fancher ("Drug-Sniffing Dogs, Hot Lines on School Campuses in County," Letters, April 11) believes there should be no wholesale application of constitutional rights in schools. These rights are not cheap bulk goods (wholesale) but have been paid for dearly in the past 200 years, often in blood. This price has been paid so that these rights will continue to apply in all places and to all people, even students in public schools. I am glad he is a former high school principal if his grasp of the founding principles of our country is so poor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
Federal officials kicked up their campaign against discriminatory school discipline policies last week, issuing first-ever guidelines for school districts on how to avoid racial disparities in student punishment. In a 23-page letter, officials with the U.S. departments of justice and education said they recognized that schools must use discipline to promote a "safe and orderly" environment but that federal data and investigations showed that African Americans were punished more harshly and frequently than whites in similar situations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1995 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1989, frustrated by what they called an epidemic of drug use, the school board of Vernonia, Ore., a small logging town, ordered that all students who sign up for sports submit to a urine test for drugs. The decision was challenged by the parents of a seventh-grade boy who refused their consent for the testing. On the issue of Fourth Amendment protection against an unreasonable search, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court.
OPINION
December 26, 2013
Re "The rights of transgender students," Editorial, Dec. 23 I agree that we do not need an initiative to roll back the reforms that make it possible for transgender students to use the school bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond to their gender identity. However, the extension of transgender rights to permit biological males who are gender-identity females to compete in girls' sports makes no sense. The reason sports are segregated by sex is because of the real biological differences that put females athletically competing with males at a disadvantage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro sat in his book-lined den, reduced to writing on a whiteboard to fight what could be his last political battle. Hours earlier, the "usually glib and gregarious" teacher and activist, as he describes himself, had been released from St. Vincent Medical Center with a serious illness that made it difficult for him to speak. But Castro insisted on meeting with me to express his frustration with President Obama. Since 2009, Castro has been trying to get the president, first lady or Vice President Joe Biden to come to Boyle Heights to honor the students of the Eastside walkouts of 1968.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
For one teacher at Northridge Middle School, campus reforms stop at his desk. That's where he spends much of his time since a series of unfounded child-abuse allegations caused him to retreat from student contact. After three separate investigations, each of which put him in fear of losing his job and his freedom, he changed his teaching methods, especially with girls. "I'm very easy," he said. "I never get angry with them anymore."
NEWS
June 16, 1990
Lawrence W. Rucker, 58, first black chairman of a Greater Los Angeles United Way regional board of directors. A retired procurement director for the National Agency for Space Administration at Edwards Air Force Base, Rucker was an active volunteer for Antelope Valley youth concerns and a champion of student rights and racial equality in schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998
Ventura County high school students are invited to enter a monthly essay contest sponsored by The Times. This month's topic: Many schools limit how students dress--banning baggy pants, for example--to curb gang activity. Do such rules infringe unnecessarily on student rights, or are they important to keep campuses safe? Here are the contest rules: * Eligibility: Any Ventura County high school student may enter. * Content: Essays must be no longer than 600 words.
NEWS
May 9, 1993
The flap over the RAND Corp. sex survey at Santa Monica High School misses the most critical problems with the test. First, the problem isn't what some might call "offensive" questions; it is the non-judgmental nature of those questions. To appease (or perhaps promote) those segments of society whose sex and moral beliefs deviate from long-standing concepts of virtuous behavior such as chastity, the test promotes moral relativity. While this educational approach does not necessarily endorse specific behavior, for many of our children whose home environments lack a values focus, moral relativism destroys their ability to think critically about values.
OPINION
December 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Here's something that California doesn't need: a replay of Proposition 8 in slightly different form. But it may get one. Opponents of a new state law that expands the rights of transgender students say they have submitted enough signatures to place a measure on the ballot to repeal it. Recent spot counts by the secretary of state show they may not have reached the threshold. In our view, California would be better off if the petitions were found to be lacking. As with Proposition 8, which altered the California constitution to ban same-sex marriages, this proposal is based on fear of and intolerance toward people whose sexuality falls outside of traditionally accepted norms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Elaine Bogart had no second thoughts about subjecting her children to drug tests. When the Santa Clarita mother learned of a program through her school district that allows parents to track the results of random tests of their children's urine, she enrolled her two teenagers right away. "It was my decision," she said. "They do have some rights, but I'm responsible for them. I need to make sure they're safe. " The William S. Hart Union High School District program is believed to be the only one of its kind in the country, according to program administrators.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Chris Dufresne
Somebody let the air out of USC football -- literally. A student manager has been relieved of his duties for helping to further deflate a program that once imposed its will on the opposition with broad-daylight sweeps called "Student Body Left" and "Student Body Right. " USC's secret weapon never used to be the eye needle of a tire pump. USC had non-secret weapons named Charles White, Marcus Allen, Ronnie Lott and Anthony Munoz. It was the program of "here's what we're going to do, you try to stop it. " The Trojans have gone from strong-in-the-pocket to pick-pockets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro sat in his book-lined den, reduced to writing on a whiteboard to fight what could be his last political battle. Hours earlier, the "usually glib and gregarious" teacher and activist, as he describes himself, had been released from St. Vincent Medical Center with a serious illness that made it difficult for him to speak. But Castro insisted on meeting with me to express his frustration with President Obama. Since 2009, Castro has been trying to get the president, first lady or Vice President Joe Biden to come to Boyle Heights to honor the students of the Eastside walkouts of 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Victoria Kim
One morning in May 2008, an eighth-grader walked into Janice Hart's office at a Beverly Hills school crying. She was upset and humiliated and couldn't possibly go to class, the girl told the counselor. The night before, a classmate had posted a video on YouTube with a group of other eighth-graders bad-mouthing her, calling her "spoiled," a "brat" and a "slut." Text and instant messages had been flying since. Half the class must have seen it by now, she told Hart. Hart took the problem to the vice principal and principal, who took it to a district administrator, who asked the district's lawyers what they could do about it. In the end, citing "cyber-bullying" concerns, school officials suspended the girl who posted the video for two days.
OPINION
April 23, 2009
You don't have to be a judge to recognize that it's outrageous to strip-search a 13-year-old girl suspected of carrying pain medicine. The question for the U.S. Supreme Court is whether this revulsion can be translated into a legal rule that won't turn every trip to the principal's office into a federal case. It's possible -- if the justices don't succumb to anti-drug hysteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2007 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Garden Grove school officials did not violate the rights of a lesbian high school student when they disciplined her for kissing and groping her girlfriend on campus or when they disclosed her sexual orientation to her mother, a federal judge has ruled. The ruling, which came almost 10 months after the trial ended, found that Charlene Nguon was treated no differently from straight students.
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