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Student Transfers

NEWS
December 30, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, the parents began pulling their children out of James Merrick's eighth-grade classroom. The teacher's mannerisms were distracting and the language he used in front of students was suspect, they told school officials. And they didn't like the way he spoke out in the community about gay issues. Since classes began in September at the rural Rio Bravo-Greeley Union School, 15 students--10 boys and five girls--have been removed from Merrick's science classes, all of them against his will.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | BERT ELJERA
Trustees at the Tustin Unified School District tentatively approved a policy this week that would allow residents to send their children to any school within the district. The open enrollment policy was passed by unanimous vote, and officials said it was done in compliance with state law that mandates open intradistrict transfers starting in school year 1994-95. The district is expected to have a final vote on the policy on Feb. 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
Hoping to boost enrollment in two of the district's smallest schools, the Brea-Olinda Unified School District has adopted a new policy that will make it more difficult for students to transfer to other schools. By unanimous vote, the Board of Education Monday banned student transfers from Laurel Elementary School and Olinda Elementary School, starting in school year 1993-94.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In a new look at the harmful effects of student transiency, a team of University of California researchers has concluded that teenagers who change schools--particularly if they are Latino--are far more likely to drop out than those who remain at one school during their high school years. The study, covering two groups of students in California over six years, found that more than half of all who dropped out had changed schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
Parents who want to transfer their children to another school in the Tustin Unified School District must make the request between March 13 and April 7, according to the district's director of student services. Brad Lantz said that application forms will be available beginning March 1. If the number of students applying for transfer to a particular school exceeds the openings, a lottery will be conducted, he said. The rest will be placed on a waiting list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
Elementary school children in Newport Beach and Costa Mesa are no longer tethered to their neighborhood schools, now that the school district has lifted its 2-year-old ban on transfers. The Newport-Mesa Unified School District enacted the moratorium on student transfers between elementary schools because of the booming population in those grades and the requirements of class-size reduction. But parents complained they didn't have enough flexibility regarding what school their children attended.
NEWS
July 14, 1985
I wish to take exception to Lee Harris' article, "ROTC to Be Added at Lynwood Campus" (Southeast / Long Beach section, Sunday, July 7). ROTC on high school campuses is a controversial subject and to treat it so superficially demeans The Times and patronizes us all. The Lynwood trustees' rationale (to prevent 5 or 10 student transfers) is, of course, ludicrous; Principal Larry Tripplett's contention that ROTC is part of an "upgrading of the entire curriculum" is equally absurd. But my objections are directed elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996 | ERIN TEXEIRA
It's open enrollment time at Los Angeles Unified schools. From now until May 24, students may apply to attend any public elementary, middle or high school--except some magnet campuses--regardless of where they live. For students who apply to schools with limited spaces, placement is not first-come, first-served, according to Shel Erlich, a Los Angeles Unified School District spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1990, state law has required school officials to inform teachers of any student who has caused or attempted to cause serious injury to another person. Under the law, school districts must provide information to teachers based on records received from law enforcement agencies or other districts. But Ventura County school officials said that, in many instances, they never know the full history of a new student.
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