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NEWS
June 5, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The first thing one noticed about the students traveling eagerly to Beijing early Sunday was how sure they were that they would not be punished for opposing the government. "We have been promised by our teachers that the army would do nothing to harm us if we remained peaceful," said Chai Chishan, an engineering scholar from the prestigious Qinghua University in Beijing. "We are not afraid of the soldiers," added Wang Binghai, a classmate who studies nuclear engineering. The students had not heard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kate Mather, Joseph Serna and Joe Mozingo
ISLA VISTA, Calif. — The scene Monday on Del Playa Drive was a curious, uniquely Isla Vista mix: part laid-back beach vibe, part riot aftermath. Beach towels fluttered over cliffside balconies as UC Santa Barbara students enjoyed spring weather. Dumpsters overflowed with beer boxes and red cups. "I was in the riot," one young woman said nonchalantly to her friend as they rode beach cruisers. "I got hit by a tear gas grenade," a male student told his friends as they carried an inflatable pool over their heads.
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NEWS
June 9, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
Students and teachers returning from China complained Thursday that the U.S. Embassy in Beijing was not helpful in getting them out of the strife-torn nation, leaving them waiting futilely for instructions while citizens of other countries were being evacuated. "We got nothing," said Roxanne Sylvester, 37, a teacher in UCLA's English-language program at the Chinese Academy of Social Science Graduate School in Beijing. She said she saw Canadian, Portuguese, Irish and French embassy personnel arrange charter flights and airport transportation for their respective citizens while the U.S. Embassy remained silent and unreachable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Bryan Mejia has some advice for the Los Angeles Board of Education. He isn't a gadfly or political consultant. He isn't running for office - he can't even vote. Mejia is a high school student. And he wants to help fix what he and other students see as the board's fundamental flaw: It is missing a voice it purports to represent. "We should have representation where the decisions affecting our education are made," the 17-year-old said. "The school board. " The board is expected to vote Tuesday on a proposal to allow a student advisory member on the board.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Odir Romero, 12, and his best friend, Hugo Ruiz, roamed aimlessly across the crowded playground at Le Conte Junior High School on Thursday morning, discussing the teachers' strike that has turned their school lives upside down. The boys, who immigrated to the United States less than a year ago, casually dodged balls and ballplayers as they ambled through basketball and volleyball courts, never breaking stride or losing the thread of their conversation. While more and more of their classmates are staying home each day the strike continues, these two keep showing up for class.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
A Fullerton middle school teacher was arrested Friday on suspicion of sexual misconduct with at least two male students, authorities and school district officials said. Melissa Lindgren, 28, of La Mirada, was charged with multiple felonies, including child molestation, child annoyance and “dissemination of harmful matter to a minor,” Fullerton police said in a statement. The Nicolas Junior High School teacher was booked and released after posting $100,000 bail, the statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Hannah Fry
Eleven students at Corona del Mar High School were expelled Tuesday in connection with a cheating scandal that has rocked the high-performing Orange County campus.  School officials allege that the students hacked into the district's computer system to change grades and access exams. Newport-Mesa Unified School District trustees reached the decision early Wednesday after lengthy closed-door discussions. In a statement, board President Karen Yelsey said the decision to expel the students from the school  -- the most severe penalty being considered -- follows the recommendations made by the school principal and district administration.
OPINION
April 3, 2009 | Angel B. Perez, Angel B. Perez is the director of admission at Pitzer College in Claremont.
I've been talking to a lot of angry people this week. They yell; I listen patiently. They cry; I empathize. The pain of not getting into the college of your dreams is unlike any other. Students call here to Pitzer College to find out what they could have done differently. Parents call to ask us to reconsider. It's hard to justify to someone who has just been "denied" the college of their dreams that although they've done everything right, we just did not have enough seats in the class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Three white students at San Jose State University have been charged with misdemeanor hate crimes after allegedly hanging a Confederate flag in a shared dormitory suite and calling a black roommate "three-fifths," among other derogatory names. The three students -- Logan Beaschler, 18, of Bakersfield. Joseph Bomgardner, 19, of Clovis and Colin Warren, 18, of Woodacre -- also allegedly locked the roommate in his room, wrote a derogatory slur on a board in the living room and fastened a bicycle lock around his neck,  according to  the San Jose Mercury News.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
DENVER - It was spring break, and Levy Thamba, a 19-year-old college student from Africa, had checked into a fourth-floor hotel room with three of his buddies. They had come from their small college in Wyoming looking for an adventure. No one is sure how much Thamba ate of the marijuana cookie purchased by one of his friends at a local pot shop. But soon the engineering student, who had never tried marijuana before, began acting strangely hostile, tearing around the room and pulling pictures from the wall.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Theshia Naidoo and Lynne Lyman
Jesse Snodgrass had recently transferred to Chaparral High School in Temecula and was feeling out of place and alone in 2012 when a boy named Dan, another newcomer, befriended him. Jesse, a 17-year-old autistic student, wasn't good at making friends and he was pleased by the overture. But there was something he didn't know about Dan: He was an undercover narcotics officer attending class at Chaparral hoping to bust student drug dealers. Dan quickly began exerting pressure on Jesse to sneak a pill from his parent's medicine cabinet or buy him some marijuana.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Nutritious but uneaten," April 2 The Los Angeles Unified School District serves 650,000 meals a day, with $100,000 worth of food thrown away each day by students. That adds up to $18 million wasted every year. Our society needs a renaissance of responsibility - and to resolve not to waste food. What better places to start than in homes and schools? For decades, nutritionists and educators have taught that certain foods are junk, rather than focusing on the cardinal principles of variety and moderation.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Without a returning starter, Oak Park (22-11) was barely a blip on the radar screen as a possible Southern Section champion when the season started. By season's end, the Eagles were the Division 3A champion, winners of the first basketball title in the school's history. For being able to rebuild and reload without relying on transfer students, Aaron Shaw has been selected the coach of the year by The Times. "We struggled early in the season, and it took us a little bit of time to figure out our roles," Shaw said.
WORLD
April 4, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - Officials at Venezuela's largest university called on President Nicolas Maduro on Friday to help protect students after masked pro-government vigilantes attacked a peaceful gathering on campus and injured seven people. Victor Marquez, president of the faculty association at the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas, said the attack Thursday on a group of about 1,200 students was carried out by men armed with metal pipes and wooden rods as national guard members stood by. Witnesses said the assailants also had pistols, but no shots were fired.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
TAIPEI, Taiwan - For decades, relations between Taiwan and its giant neighbor China have been one of the great success stories of the ending of the Cold War. Slowly but surely, the two nations have pulled back from half a century of bellicose confrontation and in recent years embraced a level of political and economic cooperation that seemed to promise new riches for both. But today, for many Taiwanese, the bloom is off the rose. This disenchantment lay behind the outbreak of angry protests from Taiwanese students that are in their third week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
While Jennifer Clay was at home taking an online exam for her business law class, a proctor a few hundred miles away was watching her every move. Using a webcam mounted in Clay's Los Angeles apartment, the monitor in Phoenix tracked how frequently her eyes shifted from the computer screen and listened for the telltale sounds of a possible helper in the room. Her computer browser was locked - remotely - to prevent Internet searches, and her typing pattern was analyzed to make sure she was who she said she was: Did she enter her password with the same rhythm as she had in the past?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
As part of a major overhaul of the SAT college entrance exam, test-takers starting in 2016 will no longer be required to write an essay, the College Board announced Wednesday. However, an essay-writing test still will be offered, and many colleges may demand that applicants take it and submit the score. With that change, the main SAT will be condensed to two sections from the current three, and the top possible score will be 1,600, as it was for many decades. The current 2,400-point maximum was introduced with the start of the required essay seven years ago. The new optional essay test will be graded separately on a scale that is still under consideration, said officials of the College Board, which owns the widely used exam.
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times' editorial on an effort at UC Santa Barbara to have professors put "trigger warnings" on their course syllabi when lecture material may cause some distress reminded me of a class I took my freshman year in college. My father was raised in Minnesota; I listened to his racism my whole childhood. In our small agricultural community, I was never really exposed to other opinions. In that first year of college, I enrolled in an English course that focused on black literature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
During a packed and sometimes tense four-hour public hearing Saturday, Los Angeles County transportation officials heard a litany of complaints from transit riders who said a proposed Metro fare hike would strain the budgets of students and working-class families. A crowd of more than 500 activists, students and low-wage workers packed Metro's downtown boardroom and spilled into the cafeteria as speaker after speaker pressed elected officials to avoid fare increases or service cutbacks.
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