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NEWS
June 5, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The first thing one noticed about the students traveling eagerly to Beijing early Sunday was how sure they were that they would not be punished for opposing the government. "We have been promised by our teachers that the army would do nothing to harm us if we remained peaceful," said Chai Chishan, an engineering scholar from the prestigious Qinghua University in Beijing. "We are not afraid of the soldiers," added Wang Binghai, a classmate who studies nuclear engineering. The students had not heard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
Getting the strangers to open up wasn't easy. But Jesus Rodriguez, a high school senior, pressed on, clipboard and questionnaire in hand. He and about 15 other students spent Thursday evening at MacArthur Park, interviewing people about their lives, their well-being and the health of their neighborhood. Their responses will be the basis for an intricate art installation to be displayed at the park in the fall. For Rodriguez, 18, the exercise was eye-opening. He spent two hours approaching random men and women, some of them homeless.
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NEWS
June 9, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE and JACK JONES, Times Staff Writers
Students and teachers returning from China complained Thursday that the U.S. Embassy in Beijing was not helpful in getting them out of the strife-torn nation, leaving them waiting futilely for instructions while citizens of other countries were being evacuated. "We got nothing," said Roxanne Sylvester, 37, a teacher in UCLA's English-language program at the Chinese Academy of Social Science Graduate School in Beijing. She said she saw Canadian, Portuguese, Irish and French embassy personnel arrange charter flights and airport transportation for their respective citizens while the U.S. Embassy remained silent and unreachable.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I got a big tax refund this year and am trying to figure out what to do with the money. Right now I have school loans with a 4% interest rate that I do not need to make a payment on until 2024 with my current payment plan, but the amount I owe is pretty hefty and I know it's going to compound more over time. I also have a very low-interest car loan (1.9%) that will be paid off in 31/2 years. I also could put that money in the market in hopes that it will grow. I should add I am 27 years old. Any advice?
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Odir Romero, 12, and his best friend, Hugo Ruiz, roamed aimlessly across the crowded playground at Le Conte Junior High School on Thursday morning, discussing the teachers' strike that has turned their school lives upside down. The boys, who immigrated to the United States less than a year ago, casually dodged balls and ballplayers as they ambled through basketball and volleyball courts, never breaking stride or losing the thread of their conversation. While more and more of their classmates are staying home each day the strike continues, these two keep showing up for class.
OPINION
May 28, 2011 | By Alexandra Robbins
Many popular students approach graduation day with bittersweet nostalgia: excitement for the future is tempered by fear of lost status. But as cap-and-gown season nears, let's also stop to consider the outcasts, students for whom finishing high school feels like liberation from a state-imposed sentence. In seven years of reporting from American middle and high schools, I've seen repeatedly that the differences that cause a student to be excluded in high school are often the same traits or skills that will serve him or her well after graduation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
Khadijah Williams stepped into chemistry class and instantly tuned out the commotion. She walked past students laughing, gossiping, napping and combing one another's hair. Past a cellphone blaring rap songs. And past a substitute teacher sitting in a near-daze. Quietly, the 18-year-old settled into an empty table, flipped open her physics book and focused. Nothing mattered now except homework. "No wonder you're going to Harvard," a girl teased her. Around here, Khadijah is known as "Harvard girl," the "smart girl" and the girl with the contagious smile who landed at Jefferson High School only 18 months ago. What students don't know is that she is also a homeless girl.
OPINION
August 23, 2012
Re "A good teacher is hard to keep," Opinion, Aug. 19 Sujata Bhatt describes how too many teachers fail to receive validation or support from their schools or districts. I have organized professional development workshops for more than 2,000 educators. I ask at each workshop if the teachers (usually 60 or more) feel appreciated at their school. One teacher may raise a hand. Administrators could easily validate excellent teachers with brief email messages of support and by honoring those teachers who go the extra mile to attend workshops to become even more effective.
WORLD
July 22, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
After philosophy students and faculty members rallied to denounce heavy-handed efforts to separate male and female students, Islamists on campus struck back: In the dead of night, witnesses say, the radicals showed up at a men's dormitory armed with wooden sticks and bicycle chains. They burst into dorm rooms, attacking philosophy students. One was pistol-whipped and hit on the head with a brick. Gunfire rang out, although no one was injured. Police were called, but nearly a month after the attack, no arrests have been made.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Ted Rall
A science teacher at an intermediate school in Oxnard was fired after students claimed to have seen her in a porn movie. No one asked why children were watching porn movies. ALSO: Clear the tracks, Beverly Hills Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Doctor finds the G spot -- in Poland For more from Ted Rall, visit tedrall.com or follow him on Twitter: @TedRall .
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest - the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Here is what we found at Loyola Marymount: The Seaver School of Science and Engineering at Loyola Marymount is not for the faint of academic heart. But it's where a fair share of Loyola Marymount athletes - 27 of 395 to be exact - focus their studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District will seek the approval of parents before sending iPads home with students, under an updated policy. "That is a wonderful development," said school board member Monica Ratliff. "Parents need to be clearly notified that the device is going home, and that it will go home only if they agree to it.” Officials chose this approach in response to families who objected to earlier plans, which would have distributed tablets for home use among all students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A Los Angeles high school science teacher returned to the classroom Friday two months after being suspended over concerns that two students had assembled "dangerous" science projects under his supervision. Both projects overseen by teacher Greg Schiller were capable of launching small objects. A staff member at the downtown Cortines School of Visual & Performing Arts had raised concerns about one of them. Both are common in science fairs. "I am very excited to be back with my students and help them prepare for the Advanced Placement tests, which are a week away," Schiller said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Ruben Vives and Sam Schaefer
A school bus crashed near a golf course in Anaheim Hills on Thursday afternoon, trapping the driver and leaving more than a dozen people injured, including nine students. The crash was reported around 3:38 p.m. in the 6500 block of East N ohl Ranch Canyon Road, along the Anaheim Hills Golf Course, according to Fire Marshal Jeff Lutz of the Anaheim Fire Department.  Video footage on KTLA showed the yellow bus wedged into a tree at the base of a hillside, and then the driver being extricated from the front of the vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Paloma Esquivel
Moments after a school bus crashed in the Anaheim Hills, students screamed for help as Good Samaritans rushed to free them from the wrecked vehicle, according to witnesses. The witnesses heard a loud crack Thursday afternoon as the yellow bus smashed into trees on a grassy hill along East Nohl Ranch Road by the Anaheim Hills Golf Course.  "I saw the bus drive up and fly up and crash," said Michelle Imperial, who was driving in the opposite direction. She said she pulled over and called 911 as children screamed: "Help me!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | Larry Gordon
At his formal investiture ceremony Thursday, UC Riverside Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox called for significant expansions in enrollment, faculty and the campus itself. UC Riverside should grow its student ranks from the current 22,000 to 25,000 over the next six years as called for in its master plan but also go beyond that in the future, Wilcox said. The university will need to hire 300 more faculty members to accommodate growth and replace retiring professors, he said, according to his speech.
OPINION
August 30, 2013
Re "For students, fossil fuels become an issue of conscience," Aug. 26 Congratulations to the students of San Francisco State University who persuaded the trustees of their college to divest from fossil fuel companies. However, this article has an egregious omission: the carbon bubble. This bubble will likely pop and fossil fuel stocks will crash in the next decade or so if we are to preserve the planet for future generations. According to the climate change activist group 350.org, the planet cannot handle more than 565 gigatons of carbon emissions before 2050.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Students in 11 middle school classrooms on the Malibu High School campus will be relocated to classrooms at the high school and a nearby elementary school after parents and teachers voiced concerns about potential contaminants in a building. The decision to relocate the Malibu Middle School students comes after teachers banded together to inform the district that several staff members working in the same set of buildings had recently been diagnosed with health problems. Malibu Middle School shares campus space with Malibu High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The mother of a 17-year-old student who died when a FedEx freight truck slammed into a college-bound bus in Northern California, creating a fireball of wreckage, has filed a wrongful death lawsuit, claiming the company's vehicles have a history of catching fire. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, is the first to be filed since the April 10 collision, which occurred after the FedEx truck crossed a median. F ive students from Southern California high schools and three adult chaperons bound for Humboldt State University perished in the fiery crash, as did both the drivers.
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