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Students At Beijing University

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NEWS
June 5, 1989
As violence between protesters and People's Liberation Army troops continued in Beijing, students at Beijing University, seat of the pro-democracy movement, held memorial vigils on the sprawling campus. Troops reportedly surrounded Beijing Teachers University and another campus. Although there were no reports of any raids, students fear arrests may be near. In other developments: Army sends at least 50 more tanks and 150 more armored personnel carriers into Tian An Men Square, site of two days of bloodshed, adding to the 12 tanks and 50 armored personnel carriers already there.
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NEWS
June 5, 1989
As violence between protesters and People's Liberation Army troops continued in Beijing, students at Beijing University, seat of the pro-democracy movement, held memorial vigils on the sprawling campus. Troops reportedly surrounded Beijing Teachers University and another campus. Although there were no reports of any raids, students fear arrests may be near. In other developments: Army sends at least 50 more tanks and 150 more armored personnel carriers into Tian An Men Square, site of two days of bloodshed, adding to the 12 tanks and 50 armored personnel carriers already there.
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NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Chinese students in the United States have written an open letter to their government expressing strong support for the pro-democracy student demonstrations in China. The message was read by telephone Tuesday to students at Beijing University who tape-recorded it for dissemination in China, Guyang Huang, a University of Massachusetts graduate student, said Thursday in a telephone interview. Students at the University of Massachusetts wrote the five-paragraph document last Saturday and placed it on the two-year-old computer network that allows Chinese studying in the United States, Europe, Australia and Japan to communicate about events in China.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From the Associated Press
April 15 -- Former Communist Party chief Hu Yaobang, a leading reformer, dies. Students at Beijing University put up posters praising him and indirectly criticizing his opponents who forced his resignation in early 1987 after student demonstrations in 1986-87. April 17 -- Thousands of students march in Beijing and Shanghai shouting, "Long live Hu Yaobang! Long live democracy! Long live freedom! Long live the rule of law!" April 18 -- About 2,000 students from Beijing head into Tian An Men Square by bicycle, continuing the protest sit-in at Great Hall of the People.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From the Associated Press
April 15 -- Former Communist Party chief Hu Yaobang, a leading reformer, dies. Students at Beijing University put up posters praising him and indirectly criticizing his opponents who forced his resignation in early 1987 after student demonstrations in 1986-87. April 17 -- Thousands of students march in Beijing and Shanghai shouting, "Long live Hu Yaobang! Long live democracy! Long live freedom! Long live the rule of law!" April 18 -- About 2,000 students from Beijing head into Tian An Men Square by bicycle, continuing the protest sit-in at Great Hall of the People.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | From Reuters
Students who twice paralyzed Beijing with mass demonstrations said Sunday they are likely to refrain from protests during the visit to China next week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, a man they champion as a Communist reformer. Gorbachev's historic visit will mark a significant reduction in 30 years of tension between the two Communist countries, and students said that trouble during the visit would be a terrible loss of face for China. "The visit is too important for our country," said a student at Teachers University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Chinese students studying throughout the United States have written an open letter to their government expressing strong support for the pro-democracy student demonstrations in China. Students at UC San Diego, whose contingent of 230 Chinese students is one of the largest among American universities, have been instrumental along with their peers at other campuses in raising funds through a special computer network to distribute the message in China. The message was read by telephone on Tuesday to students at Beijing University who tape-recorded it for dissemination in China.
NEWS
May 7, 1989
Students at Beijing University in the Chinese capital voted to continue a two-week class boycott for democratic reforms, despite calls by protest leaders to drop the strike. The United Assn. of Beijing Universities, an independent group that has organized three weeks of demonstrations, urged that students head back to class and continue their campaign through "speeches, plays and pamphlets." But at Beijing University, students voted in favor of continuing the boycott. Some students at Beijing Normal University also said they would stay out of school.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China stepped up its attack on foreigners and especially Western journalists, accusing them of fomenting disturbances around the second anniversary of an army crackdown on a mass pro-democracy movement. People's Daily, the official Communist Party newspaper, specifically attacked Western wire services and other media for sending squads of journalists to the university district--a center of unrest in 1989--during the anniversary this month of pro-democracy protests.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Students at several Beijing universities have defiantly put up posters in memory of those killed in China's crackdown on a pro-democracy movement two years ago, campus reports said Wednesday. The posters carried slogans such as "We Will Not Forget June 4" and other anti-government statements. They were put up after students at Beijing University unfurled posters and passed out leaflets Tuesday in the first such protest in a year.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | From Reuters
Students who twice paralyzed Beijing with mass demonstrations said Sunday they are likely to refrain from protests during the visit to China next week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, a man they champion as a Communist reformer. Gorbachev's historic visit will mark a significant reduction in 30 years of tension between the two Communist countries, and students said that trouble during the visit would be a terrible loss of face for China. "The visit is too important for our country," said a student at Teachers University.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Chinese students in the United States have written an open letter to their government expressing strong support for the pro-democracy student demonstrations in China. The message was read by telephone Tuesday to students at Beijing University who tape-recorded it for dissemination in China, Guyang Huang, a University of Massachusetts graduate student, said Thursday in a telephone interview. Students at the University of Massachusetts wrote the five-paragraph document last Saturday and placed it on the two-year-old computer network that allows Chinese studying in the United States, Europe, Australia and Japan to communicate about events in China.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Chinese students studying throughout the United States have written an open letter to their government expressing strong support for the pro-democracy student demonstrations in China. Students at UC San Diego, whose contingent of 230 Chinese students is one of the largest among American universities, have been instrumental along with their peers at other campuses in raising funds through a special computer network to distribute the message in China. The message was read by telephone on Tuesday to students at Beijing University who tape-recorded it for dissemination in China.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | From Reuters
All of next term's new students at Beijing University, a hotbed of recent unrest, will be sent to army academies for a year of military and political training, a university official said Monday. Huang Weicheng, head of the president's office, said October's intake of first-year students will also be cut to 800 from the more than 2,000 originally planned. "The students will go through military and political training. They--men and women--will learn basic culture and military affairs," he said.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | JIM MANN and DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writers
A new wave of fear swept Beijing today as military convoys rumbled through the Chinese capital, firing repeatedly into the air and sometimes at pedestrians, while more armor was sent to reinforce the army's hold on Tian An Men Square. About 400 tanks, armored vehicles, troop and munition trucks moved into the square early today following a second day of bloodshed in central Beijing, while other convoys roamed the city around noon. Gunfire rocked the city's embassy section at about 1 p.m. as troops moved north past the compound housing the American ambassador's residence and the press and cultural section of the U.S. Embassy.
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