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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The number of students in California's public schools who speak only limited English doubled during the 1980s, and Spanish is the native tongue of three out of four of them, the state Department of Education said. An end-of-the-decade survey showed that Spanish is the most common language among three out of four students with limited English proficiency. Students whose primary language is Spanish accounted for 74% of all non-English proficient students.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Jason Song
More than 100 colleges and universities, including several in California, promised Thursday to try to attract more low-income students by strengthening relationships with high schools and community colleges, increasing access to advisors and offering more remedial programs. The pledges came after President Obama made increased college accessibility one of his top goals. On Thursday, the president invited to the White House participants who have made commitments to further that effort.
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NEWS
January 7, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson proposed a $1-billion education initiative Monday designed to improve California's dismal rank near the bottom of states in providing computer access to public school students. Wilson's plan, financed half by the state and half by local school districts, would reach all 1.6 million California high school students with computer training and access to the global Internet by 2001--providing at least one computer for every four high school students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - It used to be called "shop. " Then educators started using two-bit labels like "vocational education. " And it got worse. "Career tech," they renamed it when the dot.com era emerged. Now it goes by "linked learning. " Or is it "career pathways?" I'm confused. "Call it shop-plus," says Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), the Legislature's leading proponent of whatever it is. I'll roll my eyes and refer to it as "linked learning. " Yuk. Whatever it's called, it seems to work for high schoolers where it exists, which isn't enough places.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
If the dismal results produced by California's pioneering new student performance tests offered a bitter pill to public school educators and parents this week, not everyone was willing to take the medicine. The president of the state's biggest teachers union complained that the math questions were too hard. Many school district officials said students and teachers were not given adequate time to prepare.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California students still have a long way to go to become proficient writers, according to results of a comprehensive statewide test of eighth-graders. In fact, the average score for students taking the California Assessment Program's writing test last spring dropped a full point from the 256 average earned by eighth-graders in 1988, results released Wednesday showed. However, Supt.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California's schoolchildren are woefully out of shape, although girls appear to be in somewhat better condition than boys, results of the state's first attempt to test students' physical fitness showed Tuesday. In releasing the results, Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said the scores for the nearly 800,000 fifth-, seventh- and ninth-graders surveyed last spring confirmed the experts' suspicions that most California children are couch potatoes.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday that the latest results from the California Assessment Program test for elementary students--the first new scores to be released since a cheating scandal rocked the testing program--bring generally good news about the academic health of the state's grade schools.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Forty elementary schools statewide, including 12 in Southern California, cheated on the 1985-86 California Assessment Program test used to measure overall school progress in basic reading, writing and mathematics, according to a state Department of Education investigation. A separate investigation by Los Angeles Unified School District officials turned up an additional 11 elementary schools where teachers and a classroom aide admitted either changing scores or coaching students during the test.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that could affect university policy statewide, a Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday that students who are undocumented aliens should not be counted as California residents when calculating their tuition costs. The ruling came in a lawsuit brought by a former UCLA employee who contends that the state has lost millions of dollars by allowing illegal aliens to pay in-state tuition--a claim university officials deny. David P.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2013 | By David Zucchino
Ayaanah Gibson, a pregnant 19-year-old freshman from Sacramento, was alone in her dormitory room at Benedict College in Columbia, S.C., over the Labor Day weekend.  At some point, Gibson gave birth, lost consciousness and bled to death, according to the local coroner. Gibson's body was found late Tuesday night, along with the baby, which apparently was stillborn, said Gary Watts, the Richland County coroner. "She died from a loss of blood due to a spontaneous delivery," Watts said in a telephone interview with the Los Angeles Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Ah Ram Kim is a 17-year-old high school student learning to read English at a first-grade level with the book "The Little Red Hen. " Newly arrived from South Korea, she is one of 170 students, who are from Mexico, Vietnam, Egypt, Japan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and elsewhere, at Torrance's North High who are struggling to catch up. Although Kim has the same academic needs as limited-English speakers in a nearby school district in Lawndale, North...
NATIONAL
February 18, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
Bucking the current trend toward cutting social programs in order to reduce the deficit, Rep. Grace F. Napolitano (D-Norwalk) introduced a bill Thursday that would provide $200 million for schools to hire mental health professionals to diagnose and treat psychologically troubled students before they become involved in violent or criminal behavior. What gives Napolitano at least a glimmer of hope that her proposal might have a chance, even though budget-minded Republicans are in charge of the House, is that violence by people whose emotional problems surfaced in school is a concern that cuts across party lines.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
It's not unusual for government agencies with budget problems to start outsourcing services to private industry. Computer maintenance, prison management, landscaping — all are among the services that state or local bureaucrats have handed off to private firms over the years. What about college education? It turns out that California is trying to outsource our public higher education system to the for-profit college industry. What is surprising is that this is happening without any evidence that the affected students would be well served.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2003 | Doug Smith, Times Staff Writer
Even as they aim to exceed the national average on standardized tests, California schools have far fewer teachers per 1,000 students than the rest of the country, a study released Tuesday concluded. The state has 74% of the teachers that other states do, considering the size of its student population. "Despite the high expectations for them, California schools have relatively modest resources," the report by the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong and Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writers
Faced with deep cuts in state funding, the California State University trustees approved a 30% fee increase for its students on Wednesday, while a key committee of the University of California Regents backed a boost of at least 25%. All told, the fee increases will affect about 600,000 public university students in the state, marking a sharp incursion of the state's budget crisis into the ranks of the middle class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1993 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On playgrounds and school buses around California, where boys and girls chase and torture each other, a new description is being being applied to their age-old behavior: sexual harassment. Under a new state law that went into effect Jan. 1, students in fourth through 12th grades may be suspended or expelled for engaging in sexual harassment.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With Generals Grant, Lee, Eisenhower and MacArthur watching from a poster over his office desk, Joe Stephenson is helping to carry the flag in California for the alma mater of those famous military men--the United States Military Academy at West Point. As the New York-based academy's first full-time professional recruiter on the West Coast, Stephenson has discouraging news this time of year for most applicants on the crowded waiting list for admission to West Point's graduating Class of 1995.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave final approval Tuesday to legislation that establishes the broadest federal testing requirements yet for elementary and middle schools, provides billions of dollars to help needy students learn basic skills and prescribes new options for those stuck in languishing schools.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is law that leaves students suicidal, disbelieving, or quietly hopeless. It leaves high school teachers enraged and weeping, and drives a few to risk their careers, and even become accomplices to fraud. But to its advocates, it is fair and necessary that federal law and court decisions have effectively barred most undocumented students from going to college.
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