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Students Czechoslovakia

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November 29, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weekends are sacred in Czechoslovakia, especially for the privileged. So as the sun turned the few wispy clouds over Prague to pink on the crisp autumn Friday afternoon of Nov. 17, Communist Party leader Milos Jakes and most other members of the Politburo left for their country homes. According to a source close to the party hierarchy, there had been an argument in the Politburo earlier in the week over whether to sanction a student demonstration that Friday afternoon.
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OPINION
December 10, 1989 | Karel Kovanda, Karel Kovanda, a student dissident in Prague, 1968, now a computer-industry manager in California, was sent to Czechoslovakia by Global Outlook news service
The current Prague revolution began without me in mid-November; my anguish about sitting in Santa Cruz increased daily until I grabbed an opportunity to go back to Czechoslovakia, to visit the city where I grew up, attended college, earned my first political credentials as a dissident--the city where old friends are often closer than brothers. This revolution is not much like the Prague Spring of 1968. First, this is indeed a revolution; 1968 was a reform.
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OPINION
December 10, 1989 | Karel Kovanda, Karel Kovanda, a student dissident in Prague, 1968, now a computer-industry manager in California, was sent to Czechoslovakia by Global Outlook news service
The current Prague revolution began without me in mid-November; my anguish about sitting in Santa Cruz increased daily until I grabbed an opportunity to go back to Czechoslovakia, to visit the city where I grew up, attended college, earned my first political credentials as a dissident--the city where old friends are often closer than brothers. This revolution is not much like the Prague Spring of 1968. First, this is indeed a revolution; 1968 was a reform.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weekends are sacred in Czechoslovakia, especially for the privileged. So as the sun turned the few wispy clouds over Prague to pink on the crisp autumn Friday afternoon of Nov. 17, Communist Party leader Milos Jakes and most other members of the Politburo left for their country homes. According to a source close to the party hierarchy, there had been an argument in the Politburo earlier in the week over whether to sanction a student demonstration that Friday afternoon.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | From Times Wire Service
Libya has ordered the expulsion of about 150 British, Spanish and Italian citizens in retaliation for the deportation of Libyans citizens from the three Europeans countries, officials said Wednesday. Col. Moammar Kadafi's government issued expulsion orders Tuesday for 19 Britons, about 50 Italians and 80 employees of two Spanish companies. Apparently, the expulsions are random. Employers of the Britons were given quotas and allowed to decide who to send home.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Palach was finally vindicated here Tuesday, 21 years after he turned himself into a human torch for freedom. On Jan. 16, 1969, Palach, inspired by monks who were immolating themselves to protest events half a world away in Vietnam, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square to protest the Soviet-led invasion of his country five months earlier. The 21-year-old Palach died three days later, a symbol of resistance that shocked, inspired and in some instances shamed his countrymen.
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