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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 6:15 a.m., when the lights go on at the Mason Avenue Red Cross Shelter, Jannet Nguyen, 11, is among the first up and out of her cot. But then, she has a lot on her mind. "Yesterday, I didn't do my homework because those kids, they're too noisy," Jannet said, her words coming out in a rush of frustration while her mother implored her two younger sisters to wake up and get ready for school. "I'm worried about that. I don't want to get a D or F.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 19, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali and Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times
NEWTOWN, Conn. - A 7-year-old who dreamed of being a fireman. A heroic teacher who loved flamingoes. A beloved principal whose last act was trying to save the children in her care. The grim procession of memorial services continued Wednesday as Newtown and surrounding communities bade tearful farewell to more victims of last week's shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, which left 20 students and six school staffers dead. First-grade teacher Victoria Leigh Soto received a hero's funeral at the Lordship Community Church in Stratford, Conn., complete with a police honor guard - officers in full dress uniforms and white gloves, marching in precise formation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 6:15 a.m., when the lights go on at the Mason Avenue Red Cross Shelter in Chatsworth, Jannet Nguyen, 11, is among the first up and out of her cot. She has a lot on her mind. "Yesterday I didn't do my homework because those kids, they're too noisy," Jannet said, her words coming out in a rush of frustration while her mother implored her two younger sisters to get ready for school. "I'm worried about that. I don't want to get a D or F. "It's hard to go to school and live here."
OPINION
November 23, 2012
For several years now, a handful of states have tried to control illegal immigration by enacting laws that explicitly ban young undocumented immigrants from receiving reduced in-state tuition to public colleges and universities. That was bad enough. Now, education officials in some of those states are stooping even lower and attempting to use the same strategy to discriminate against U.S.-born students whose parents are in this country illegally. Thankfully, state and federal courts have intervened and put an end to those misguided policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
To promote the use of cable television in classrooms, Cablevision Industries is holding a free conference for educators next month that will feature shows from cable channels such as CNN and the Learning Channel. Cablevision education coordinator Gloria Pollack said the Valley Cable in the Classroom Conference will be held from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. March 16 at Millikan Middle School in Sherman Oaks. "To begin with, students are already accustomed to watching TV. So why not let it work for you?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1993
Michael Wilson, an English teacher at Taft High School in Woodland Hills, led the school's academic decathlon team to a state championship and second place in the national finals this year. Wilson, 36, last week began a two-year leave of absence from the Los Angeles Unified School District to teach American literature at a private school in Athens serving the international business and diplomatic community. He spoke with Times staff writer Henry Chu the day before his departure for Greece.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only the Los Angeles riots and network television could have linked Rudy Campbell with Victor Maul. Rudy, 13, lives with eight other youngsters and three adults in a three-bedroom apartment in Lincoln Heights near downtown Los Angeles. Maul lives in San Francisco. He is a 47-year-old former computer technician for Travelers Insurance who is dying of AIDS. As the riots started April 29, when Rudy left the back gate of Virgil Junior High School on Vermont Avenue, a CBS news crew was waiting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1985 | Jane Galbraith
The slogan "Instinct Made Us Walk; Education Made Us Fly," written by Maria Zangan of Sowers Middle School in Huntington Beach, won the top prize in the first Delta Kappa Gamma Educational Slogan Contest, sponsored by the honor society for women in education. The contest is designed to focus students' attention on what education means to them and their futures. Zangan was competing against 1,160 seventh- and eighth-grade students from schools throughout Orange County. She received $50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2007 | Ruben Vives, Times Staff Writer
Long after the final bell at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School in Anaheim, more than 100 students from first through sixth grade sit quietly at their desks. The only sounds are of pencils moving, chairs squeaking and the occasional whisper. This is homework time for one of the 46 schools where 4,800 students are enrolled in Anaheim Achieves, an after-school program operated by the Anaheim Family YMCA.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Assistant Principal Lee Griffin looks at Compton High, she sees beyond the sprawling hodgepodge of some 20 aging buildings, many of them defaced by graffiti. And beyond roofs that leak with every storm. She sees something more than hundreds of students who speak limited English and student test scores that are among the lowest in the state. When Griffin looks at Compton High, she sees potential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2012 | By Tony Perry and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - The bellowing from the drill instructors began as soon as the newcomers arrived. "GET OFF THE BUS!" barked one D.I. It's a ritual reenacted countless times since 1923, when young men first began coming to boot camp to see if they were tough enough to be Marines. But last week's group was not composed of frightened young recruits. Instead they were high school teachers, guidance counselors and administrators from school districts in the Los Angeles and Sacramento areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The line of students who walk the few blocks from Western Avenue Elementary keeps getting longer. Only a year ago, it was just a handful who ventured once a week to the South Los Angeles Learning Center, an afterschool program for homeless children in a tiny strip mall. Now, it's more than a dozen, five days a week. On this afternoon, the kids are rowdy and restless. They chomp on chips and grapes, sip punch and chatter. The noise ricochets through the cramped classroom, but Charles Evans, the man who runs the place for School on Wheels, hones in on Jeanquis.
OPINION
December 23, 2009 | By Dale Russakoff
For a succinct vision of the role parents can play in their children's education, a useful starting point is a tale of three mothers and an eggplant, told by Phyllis Hunter, former director of reading for Houston's public schools. Hunter's first mother wheels her shopping cart down the produce aisle of a supermarket, where her kindergartner spots an eggplant and asks what it is. The mother shushes her child, ignoring the question. The second mother, faced with the same question, responds curtly, "That's an eggplant, but we don't eat it."
BUSINESS
March 1, 2009 | Kathy M. Kristof
If you're paying for a college education, you may need an advanced degree to figure out how to claim federal tax breaks for those expenses. Congress in recent years has approved myriad special credits, deductions and other tax breaks for people paying tuition bills and related costs, and new breaks and twists were added in the recent stimulus bill. The tax breaks can be generous, saving you as much as $2,500 per student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2007 | Ruben Vives, Times Staff Writer
Long after the final bell at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School in Anaheim, more than 100 students from first through sixth grade sit quietly at their desks. The only sounds are of pencils moving, chairs squeaking and the occasional whisper. This is homework time for one of the 46 schools where 4,800 students are enrolled in Anaheim Achieves, an after-school program operated by the Anaheim Family YMCA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2006 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Iris Sanchez is stumbling toward high school. With two weeks left before winter break started, the quiet eighth-grader was flunking math, science and history. She was studying little at home and missing classes. She has, in short, the makings of a dropout. But on a recent Tuesday morning, Iris was pulled out of her third-period class at Sepulveda Middle School and called to the counseling office. She slipped meekly into a closet-sized room and found herself face to face with Lauren Weiss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1995
Re: "O.C. Schools Ahead of the Learning Curve," Sept. 17. I have read the Los Angeles Times cover to cover the 10 years I have been in California. Prior to that, I was a university professor for 13 years. I have eagerly read all your articles on education. Always, there is news of the latest methodology, the need for more money and the need for smaller classes. Frequently, as in the above article, there is one approach pitted against another. But the one factor I've always noticed missing is the fact that no one talks about the need for disciplined study on the part of the students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The line of students who walk the few blocks from Western Avenue Elementary keeps getting longer. Only a year ago, it was just a handful who ventured once a week to the South Los Angeles Learning Center, an afterschool program for homeless children in a tiny strip mall. Now, it's more than a dozen, five days a week. On this afternoon, the kids are rowdy and restless. They chomp on chips and grapes, sip punch and chatter. The noise ricochets through the cramped classroom, but Charles Evans, the man who runs the place for School on Wheels, hones in on Jeanquis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2006 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
The days of the birthday cupcake -- smothered in a slurry of sticky frosting and with a dash of rainbow sprinkles -- may be numbered in schoolhouses across the nation. Fears of childhood obesity have led schools to discourage and sometimes even ban what were once de rigueur grammar-school treats.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2006 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
Monday morning, Room 207: First day of a unit on the origins of life. Veteran biology teacher Al Frisby switches on the overhead projector and braces himself. As his students rummage for their notebooks, Frisby introduces his central theme: Every creature on Earth has been shaped by random mutation and natural selection -- in a word, by evolution. The challenges begin at once. "Isn't it true that mutations only make an animal weaker?" sophomore Chris Willett demands.
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