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NEWS
April 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Schoolgirls in Cairo and elsewhere suffered mysterious fainting spells, and hundreds were hospitalized. Teachers closed schools and politicians debated while doctors attributed the spells to teen-age hysteria. More than 1,000 girls between 12 and 18 years old have suffered nausea and fainting spells since the first cases were reported last week. No serious aftereffects have been reported.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
UCLA senior Layesanna Maria Rivera had been at her school's archaeological dig in central Egypt for only three weeks when regional police told organizers that Rivera and the 10 other students there would have to leave. Flanked by armed guards, they drove in a caravan 200 miles up the Nile Valley toward the international airport outside Cairo. Military checkpoints and a nationwide curfew turned the six-hour drive into a two-day journey. One of the last things Rivera saw before she left Egypt on Tuesday on a chartered flight was a phalanx of military tanks, ready to roll into the city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
UCLA senior Layesanna Maria Rivera had been at her school's archaeological dig in central Egypt for only three weeks when regional police told organizers that Rivera and the 10 other students there would have to leave. Flanked by armed guards, they drove in a caravan 200 miles up the Nile Valley toward the international airport outside Cairo. Military checkpoints and a nationwide curfew turned the six-hour drive into a two-day journey. One of the last things Rivera saw before she left Egypt on Tuesday on a chartered flight was a phalanx of military tanks, ready to roll into the city.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Schoolgirls in Cairo and elsewhere suffered mysterious fainting spells, and hundreds were hospitalized. Teachers closed schools and politicians debated while doctors attributed the spells to teen-age hysteria. More than 1,000 girls between 12 and 18 years old have suffered nausea and fainting spells since the first cases were reported last week. No serious aftereffects have been reported.
NEWS
March 9, 1988
Fundamentalist Muslim students in Egypt attacked a group of Boy and Girl Scouts with knives, stones and bicycle chains, then opened fire on security forces as they came to the youths' aid, authorities said. About 50 students were arrested after the incident, officials said. The trouble began during a meeting and parade of the Rovers, a group roughly equivalent to the Explorers in the American Boy Scout program, at a stadium in Assyut, Egypt.
NEWS
November 19, 2001 | Reuters
The trial of 94 suspected Muslim militants, including two prominent preachers, charged with forming or belonging to a secret group began Sunday in an Egyptian military court. Some of the men face additional charges, including plotting to assassinate security officials, planning to blow up government economic institutions, possessing weapons without a license and receiving military training abroad. Seven of the 94 men are being tried in absentia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2008 | Bassam Frangieh, Frangieh is professor of Arabic at Claremont McKenna College.
With the death of Egyptian novelist Naguib Mahfouz in 2006, only a few Egyptian writers of world stature remain, and Alaa Al Aswany has emerged as one of the most successful of these. A member of the Egyptian political opposition movement Kifaya ("enough"), Al Aswany strives to create awareness as well as ideological and practical opposition to the Egyptian political establishment.
NEWS
October 17, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Anti-American demonstrations erupted Wednesday in Cairo for the second time in four days, and leaders of small opposition groups met with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to ask that he sever diplomatic relations with Israel and the United States. Government sources said Mubarak rejected the request and told the leaders of the five opposition parties that Egypt must respect its peace treaty with Israel and cannot afford to break its ties to the United States.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
As the U.S. government updated its Egypt travel warning Sunday and announced plans for charter flights to evacuate Americans from the troubled Mideast country , private security consultants stepped up efforts to get students, business people and other U.S. travelers safely home. Here was the situation for travelers Sunday night, as described by the U.S. State Department and a security expert: New travel warning: In an update issued Sunday, the State Department recommended that U.S. citizens avoid travel to Egypt “due to ongoing political and social unrest” and noted that it had authorized the voluntary departure of dependents and non-emergency employees.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A turncoat bodyguard assassinated PLO leader Yasser Arafat's two senior deputies and a security officer Monday night at a house outside Tunis, Palestinian officials said. The killer held two relatives of one of the victims hostage for six hours before his arrest, they said. A senior Palestinian commander in Tunis said the killer is a former member of Abu Nidal's terrorist PLO faction, sworn enemies of Arafat. But "we still don't know who he's working for," the commander said.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
The four defendants allegedly called themselves "brothers," members in "the Movement." Today, federal prosecutors will begin trying to prove to a jury that former professor Sami Al-Arian and three others, using Al-Arian's state-funded university as cover, were key figures in a Middle Eastern terrorist organization.
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