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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With visions of university life dancing in his head, David Gonzalez graduated from Santa Monica College last year and headed off to Cal State Long Beach to complete his bachelor's degree in art. But to his dismay, the 21-year-old Inglewood resident found himself back at his alma mater this spring, jostling for space in the community college registration lines he thought he had left behind. The reason: Gonzalez could not get into three of the four classes he needed at Cal State Long Beach.
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OPINION
July 25, 2011
Assemblyman Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) has spent much of his legislative career trying to persuade lawmakers to grant financial help to undocumented immigrant students attending state colleges or universities. Until recently, his proposals stalled. Some opponents argued that extending such benefits would encourage more illegal immigration and displace deserving students who are in the U.S. legally. Others said such efforts would give false hope to students who would be ineligible for jobs once they graduate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER and DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 8-year-old boy at the center of the struggle to mainstream special-education students will return to class Monday as a result of the city school district's reversal of a decision two weeks ago to keep him out. School officials removed Jimmy Peters from Circle View Elementary on April 16 based on suspicions that the family lived in the jurisdiction of another school district. But Ocean View School District Supt. James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal law that provides funds for children to get free tutoring could help thousands of area students, school officials said. About 4,300 Modesto City Schools students are eligible for up to $1,163 in one-on-one instruction in math, reading or language arts under the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act. Parents have until Jan. 14 to apply. The law requires all students to become proficient in English and math by 2013-14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | ED BOND
In an effort to quell a longstanding rumor that Glendale students are illegally attending the overcrowded school, all 800 students at Joaquin Miller Elementary will have to enroll again. "I'm not sure that it's true, but then again, I'm not sure that it's not true," said Elena Hubbell, president of the Burbank Unified School District board.
SPORTS
November 15, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rules on eligibility that threw Huntington Beach and Savanna high schools for a loss this week are designed to prevent cheating and to protect the athletes. Nevertheless, a built-in shortcoming of the system is that enforcing the rules often can be painful for the innocent as well as the guilty, officials of the California Interscholastic Federation, the Southern Section and the schools conceded on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal law that provides funds for children to get free tutoring could help thousands of area students, school officials said. About 4,300 Modesto City Schools students are eligible for up to $1,163 in one-on-one instruction in math, reading or language arts under the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act. Parents have until Jan. 14 to apply. The law requires all students to become proficient in English and math by 2013-14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1986 | Associated Press
A University of California research program is being established to determine why the percentage of black high school graduates who meet UC eligibility requirements is so low, and what can be done to boost it. UC President David Gardner announced the program at a regents meeting Friday. He cited a recent study by the California Postsecondary Education Commission that found that 3.6% of black high school graduates met UC eligibility requirements in 1983, compared to 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2002 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A severe shortage of classroom space in large urban school districts is undermining a new federal education law's promise to give 3.5 million poor children the choice of better public schools this fall. One of the key features of the "No Child Left Behind" law, touted by the Bush administration as a remedy for ailing schools, offers students from low-income families the opportunity to switch from troubled campuses to better ones in the same district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two bills important to Latino immigrant groups are set to advance in the state Legislature this week, even though some lawmakers expect Gov. Gray Davis to ultimately veto the measures. One of the bills, sponsored by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles), calls for the state to allow noncitizens to obtain driver's licenses, while the other, backed by Assemblyman Marco Firebaugh (D-Los Angeles), would allow some immigrants to be eligible for in-state college tuition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2002 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A severe shortage of classroom space in large urban school districts is undermining a new federal education law's promise to give 3.5 million poor children the choice of better public schools this fall. One of the key features of the "No Child Left Behind" law, touted by the Bush administration as a remedy for ailing schools, offers students from low-income families the opportunity to switch from troubled campuses to better ones in the same district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two bills important to Latino immigrant groups are set to advance in the state Legislature this week, even though some lawmakers expect Gov. Gray Davis to ultimately veto the measures. One of the bills, sponsored by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles), calls for the state to allow noncitizens to obtain driver's licenses, while the other, backed by Assemblyman Marco Firebaugh (D-Los Angeles), would allow some immigrants to be eligible for in-state college tuition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER and DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 8-year-old boy at the center of the struggle to mainstream special-education students will return to class Monday as a result of the city school district's reversal of a decision two weeks ago to keep him out. School officials removed Jimmy Peters from Circle View Elementary on April 16 based on suspicions that the family lived in the jurisdiction of another school district. But Ocean View School District Supt. James R.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six public school districts near the border have done an inadequate job of verifying the residency of their students, in one case apparently admitting hundreds of youngsters who cross over each day from Mexico, according to a series of audits by state Controller Gray Davis. In releasing the reports this week, Davis stressed that the issue was California residency, not citizenship. State law, he said, requires districts to verify residency of all students and to collect tuition from those residing out of state, whether they come "from Nevada, Oregon--or Mexico."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1993 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With visions of university life dancing in his head, David Gonzalez graduated from Santa Monica College last year and headed off to Cal State Long Beach to complete his bachelor's degree in art. But to his dismay, the 21-year-old Inglewood resident found himself back at his alma mater this spring, jostling for space in the community college registration lines he thought he had left behind. The reason: Gonzalez could not get into three of the four classes he needed at Cal State Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | ED BOND
In an effort to quell a longstanding rumor that Glendale students are illegally attending the overcrowded school, all 800 students at Joaquin Miller Elementary will have to enroll again. "I'm not sure that it's true, but then again, I'm not sure that it's not true," said Elena Hubbell, president of the Burbank Unified School District board.
OPINION
July 25, 2011
Assemblyman Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) has spent much of his legislative career trying to persuade lawmakers to grant financial help to undocumented immigrant students attending state colleges or universities. Until recently, his proposals stalled. Some opponents argued that extending such benefits would encourage more illegal immigration and displace deserving students who are in the U.S. legally. Others said such efforts would give false hope to students who would be ineligible for jobs once they graduate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by federal "peace dividend" money freed by the end of the Cold War, Los Angeles school officials plan to establish a math and science magnet school in the San Fernando Valley aimed at hearing-impaired students--the first program of its kind in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by federal "peace dividend" money freed by the end of the Cold War, Los Angeles school officials plan to establish a math and science magnet school in the San Fernando Valley aimed at hearing-impaired students--the first program of its kind in the city.
SPORTS
November 15, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rules on eligibility that threw Huntington Beach and Savanna high schools for a loss this week are designed to prevent cheating and to protect the athletes. Nevertheless, a built-in shortcoming of the system is that enforcing the rules often can be painful for the innocent as well as the guilty, officials of the California Interscholastic Federation, the Southern Section and the schools conceded on Tuesday.
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