Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStudents Employment
IN THE NEWS

Students Employment

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 47, struggling to earn the college degree he missed three decades ago, Stephen Goldblatt knows tough. For the past two years, he's worked full time, helped manage two teen-age children while his wife has juggled work and classes--and still carried a full college load. So now that he's about to complete a special two-year program at Pierce College, what's worrying the Woodland Hills resident?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 15, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
For-profit private colleges promise to prepare students for employment in fields such as nursing, auto repair, computer technology or cosmetology. Although the programs work for some students, others have complained of paying high tuition to schools that provided inadequate training and gave them unrealistic expectations about future job prospects. Before you enroll, consider these tips from California's Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education: •To see whether the for-profit college you're considering meets California standards, visit the bureau's website at http://www.bppe.ca.gov and search the directory of "approved schools.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Editor's Note: The Times has selected three Los Angeles-area youths to write about their summer job experiences and impressions. Their essays will appear over the next few weeks. Some of her friends thought Claudia Rios should take it easy before beginning college this fall. Instead, the 17-year-old South-Central Los Angeles resident took a summer job at a medical center near Hollywood. "My friends say, 'Can't you just kick back?' " said Rios, an aspiring physician.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | JOHN SEEWER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pavel Kotas came to America to learn the language. He just didn't expect most of his English lessons to revolve around the rules of tossing a softball into a milk can. The 19-year-old from the Czech Republic was one of 700 foreign students recruited to work at Cedar Point amusement park this summer. With workers in short supply, the park hired nearly 20% of its 4,000 seasonal employees from overseas to operate roller coasters, french fry stands and ticket booths.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Martin Toumaian will make popcorn. Sara Gregory will teach swimming. And Amy Means will hurtle through the air upside down. All three are taking part in an annual American ritual, the summer job. Toumaian, 18, Gregory, 16, and Means, 20, are among thousands of young people now exiting schools and entering a panoply of low-skill, low-paying jobs, of which working in movie theaters, teaching swimming and testing roller coasters are just a few examples. They are the lucky ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989
Mayor Tom Bradley proposed Wednesday using $7.3 million in existing sales tax revenue to add 25 buses to eight of Los Angeles' busiest lines and hire 250 high school students to clean buses on those routes daily. Bradley said that many of the buses on the busiest lines are operating at 150% of capacity and that the crowded buses need to be cleaned more often.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | MONICA VALENCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aldo Aldana, then a high school senior from East Los Angeles, completed the 26-mile L.A. Marathon last year in 3 hours and 30 minutes in a wheelchair, long after the cameras, crowds and dignitaries had left. He received no medal, no trophy, no ribbon--but what Aldana won was a job. A representative from an organization called Bridges saw Aldana rolling across the finish line, tracked him down later at his school--Woodrow Wilson High--and asked him if he wanted a job.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1994 | JILL LEOVY and KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Martin Toumaian will make popcorn at Pacific Theatres' Northridge complex. Sara Gregory will teach swimming at the East Valley YMCA in North Hollywood. And Amy Means will help test roller coasters as part of her duties as a ride foreman at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1995
Give us your children's impressionable minds and we'll give them jobs. That was the deal struck this week between the local longshoremen's union and Long Beach and Los Angeles school districts. In exchange for giving 200 teen-agers summer work, the union will design a curriculum to teach students the importance of union history. Unions have long complained that the labor movement is rarely discussed in schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A much-anticipated employment-training program intended to provide city jobs to 250 students considered likely to drop out of school will be delayed for several months because of miscalculations and a slow bureaucracy, officials have acknowledged. As a result, the students, who were to have been employed by the middle of this month, are likely to remain jobless until summer's end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the newest private schools in the San Fernando Valley hopes to cash in on one of the most pressing demands facing Valley industry: the lack of qualified workers for high-tech jobs. DeVry Institute of Technology will open its new campus Nov. 1 at the site of the former Hughes Missile plant near Roscoe Boulevard and Fallbrook Avenue in West Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pierce College and Cal State Los Angeles are launching a new program in January that will enable local community college students to earn four-year bachelor's degrees in business administration without leaving the San Fernando Valley campus, officials said Tuesday. The program, aimed at working adults who need flexible class schedules, is part of a trend among colleges and universities seeking to accommodate busy students. Pierce and Cal State L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996
Los Angeles Unified School District officials have gone digital in their search for a faster, easier way for students to search for jobs and employers to find suitable employees. "First Break", a job search and placement program, is the newest addition to the district's Internet Web site. "A great percentage of students use the Internet either at school or home," said Jim Konantz, director of the district's career development division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | MONICA VALENCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aldo Aldana, then a high school senior from East Los Angeles, completed the 26-mile L.A. Marathon last year in 3 hours and 30 minutes in a wheelchair, long after the cameras, crowds and dignitaries had left. He received no medal, no trophy, no ribbon--but what Aldana won was a job. A representative from an organization called Bridges saw Aldana rolling across the finish line, tracked him down later at his school--Woodrow Wilson High--and asked him if he wanted a job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One year ago, James Burdick was a troubled teen who says he was prone to getting into fights and skipping school. Now, the tall, soft-spoken youth says he is turning his life around at "scooping school."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1995
Give us your children's impressionable minds and we'll give them jobs. That was the deal struck this week between the local longshoremen's union and Long Beach and Los Angeles school districts. In exchange for giving 200 teen-agers summer work, the union will design a curriculum to teach students the importance of union history. Unions have long complained that the labor movement is rarely discussed in schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the start of the 1989 fall semester, more than 30,000 of the Los Angeles students who began high school three years ago had dropped out--and the number of students who are leaving school appears to be rising, educators said Tuesday. Addressing the problem at a news conference Tuesday, Mayor Tom Bradley announced a part-time jobs program aimed at 1,000 students who are at risk of dropping out of school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One year ago, James Burdick was a troubled teen who says he was prone to getting into fights and skipping school. Now, the tall, soft-spoken youth says he is turning his life around at "scooping school."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 47, struggling to earn the college degree he missed three decades ago, Stephen Goldblatt knows tough. For the past two years, he's worked full time, helped manage two teen-age children while his wife has juggled work and classes--and still carried a full college load. So now that he's about to complete a special two-year program at Pierce College, what's worrying the Woodland Hills resident?
BUSINESS
June 10, 1994 | JILL LEOVY and KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Martin Toumaian will make popcorn at Pacific Theatres' Northridge complex. Sara Gregory will teach swimming at the East Valley YMCA in North Hollywood. And Amy Means will help test roller coasters as part of her duties as a ride foreman at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|