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Students Enrollment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996 | ERIN TEXEIRA
It's open enrollment time at Los Angeles Unified schools. From now until May 24, students may apply to attend any public elementary, middle or high school--except some magnet campuses--regardless of where they live. For students who apply to schools with limited spaces, placement is not first-come, first-served, according to Shel Erlich, a Los Angeles Unified School District spokesman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
When Catherine Aleman and Ana Renteria learned that L.A. Unified might move or close their small school in East Los Angeles, they did what the Academy of Environmental and Social Policy had taught them to do: They tried to make a difference and organized a protest. The students said the academy - an offshoot of Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights - transformed their lives. The small campus has created close ties with students and teachers who push them toward college and stay after hours to help them with challenges such as Shakespearean prose.
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BUSINESS
November 21, 1989 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Education & Software, an Encino-based trade school operator, said Monday that it has stopped accepting new students for its National Technical Schools' home-study program and laid off 170 of the school's 196 workers. UES said it took the actions because banks are refusing to provide loans to new students at the school. The banks have stopped making the loans because National Technical Schools' program has come under severe state and federal criticism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Jason Song
Danielle Alberts fell and broke her right ankle in three places in 2012. Alberts, who earns about $9,000 a year, went to the hospital and was charged nearly $4,000 for a shot and some pain medication. Alberts did not have health insurance. She refused a cast because it would have cost $500 more and she didn't have the money from her jobs as a security guard and caregiver. The ankle healed poorly, leaving her with a limp, and she wears a brace to keep the swelling down. So when the 25-year-old Los Angeles Trade Technical College student received insurance under Covered California, the state's health insurance exchange for the public, she began searching for a doctor who could help her walk normally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patricia looks like any Torrance teen-ager as she leaves school each afternoon, lugging her textbooks and talking with friends. But then she heads for a nearby bus stop, where, unbeknown to her teachers and most of her classmates, she boards a city bus and leaves Torrance for her home in another South Bay city. Patricia, not her real name, is one of an unknown number of students from other cities who have supplied false addresses so they can attend Torrance's highly rated public school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a simple concept: Students living within a mile of a school should go there because it's within walking distance. Newhall School District Supt. J. Michael McGrath got plenty of applause when he explained this to a group of parents who don't want planned school boundary changes to affect their children. After all, the parents say, many of them bought their houses because they were near a specific, award-winning school. But a stunned silence greeted McGrath's next statement.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
About 1,200 students are being held captive within the boundaries of the Los Angeles Unified School District, tied in a tangle of what some parents say are unreasonable rules. These students want to leave the district for a variety of reasons: fear of campus violence, convenience, better schools elsewhere--reasons not accepted by the district as grounds for departure. Some parents hire attorneys to negotiate their children's release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990
Parents bothered by a possible school closing, budget cuts and the relocation of a school for troubled teen-agers into their area have banded together to try to create a unified school district. Three groups of parents, each disgruntled over a different issue, met for the first time Monday night to discuss a joint effort. The parents plan to circulate petitions aimed at getting the unification issue on the November ballot.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County residents overwhelmingly favor a controversial proposal to allow children to attend any public school their parents choose rather than being restricted to a particular neighborhood school or school district. The concept, known as "open enrollment," is being considered in Sacramento and endorsed nationally by President Bush and others who argue that if schools had to compete for students, they would all be forced to improve. Opponents say it would never work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995 | MIMI KO
Brea Olinda Unified School District employees may soon be able to enroll their children in the schools where they work. School board members voted this week to ask the state Department of Education to allow Brea Olinda employees who are Brea parents to receive priority in placing their children at the schools where they work. The state Education Code allows teachers and other school employees to enroll their children in their place of employment based on a "random unbiased process" only.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Taiwan's minister of education, Wei-Ling Chiang, traveled to California last week to address a rarely discussed trade imbalance with the United States. "Just 3,561 American-born students are enrolled in Taiwanese universities, while about 24,000 Taiwanese students enroll in universities in the U.S," Chiang said. "We really have to address the situation now. " Concerned about a brain drain, Taiwanese education officials and top public universities are renewing their efforts to enroll more international students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UC Riverside's long-held dream to have a full medical school was badly battered last year when the state refused to pay for it and then national accreditors wouldn't allow it to open. Those denials were a blow to the UC system's proud tradition of adding campuses and programs to serve a growing state. Now, UC Riverside is making what national experts say is a rare second attempt to gain approval for a medical school. Campus officials say they have obtained alternative financial backing, worth about $10 million a year for a decade, from private donors, local government and the UC system in hopes that the medical school can enroll its first 50 students in fall 2013.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
For the 10th year in a row, USC held on to a championship that has nothing to do with sports: The Los Angeles campus once again enrolled the most foreign students of any college or university in the United States, according to a new study. UCLA had the sixth-highest international enrollment, up from seventh place the year before. Across the country, the ranks of international students enrolled in American higher education last year increased 5%, to 723,277, according to the annual report by the Institute of International Education, a New York nonprofit, in partnership with the U.S. State Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
UCLA senior Layesanna Maria Rivera had been at her school's archaeological dig in central Egypt for only three weeks when regional police told organizers that Rivera and the 10 other students there would have to leave. Flanked by armed guards, they drove in a caravan 200 miles up the Nile Valley toward the international airport outside Cairo. Military checkpoints and a nationwide curfew turned the six-hour drive into a two-day journey. One of the last things Rivera saw before she left Egypt on Tuesday on a chartered flight was a phalanx of military tanks, ready to roll into the city.
OPINION
November 18, 2010 | By Patrick Mattimore
The United States attracts more international college students ? 691,000 last year ? than any other country. Recognizing a chance to plug some financial holes, the University of California system is attempting to boost enrollment of non-Californians by recruiting some of those foreign students ("UC campuses move to recruit more out-of-state students," Nov. 14). California is a particularly attractive option to international families seeking to send their children to world-class universities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The leaders of California's three systems of public higher education made a joint plea Friday for quick passage of the much-delayed state budget, warning of negative consequences on campuses if the deadlock in Sacramento continues much longer. "A late budget really hurts us in the pocketbook and simply denies more and more students access," said Jack Scott, chancellor of the California Community Colleges. Scott, along with University of California President Mark G. Yudof and Cal State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed, told a Los Angeles business forum that the lack of a state budget since July is causing the colleges and universities to borrow money, and said the situation threatens the ability of some students to enroll and receive financial aid. At Cal State campuses, for example, financial uncertainty could jeopardize tentative plans to admit transfer students for next winter or spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994
Will the day ever come when mail is postmarked "San Fernando Valley, CA"? Many Valley residents already feel separate from Los Angeles. And many non-Valley urbanites view the Valley the same way. Actual secession has even been discussed in the past. In terms of size and services, the Valley could certainly hold its own against other large cities. If it were a city, the Valley's population size would rank sixth in the country. It would cover about the same square-mile area as Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Cleveland High School in Reseda, students snaked their way through four lines to buy lunch outside the cafeteria, still closed by earthquake damage. At Fulton Middle School in Van Nuys, teachers met in daylong planning sessions in classrooms with missing ceiling tiles and patched walls. At Reseda High School, students took a dance class outside on the asphalt near the empty, quake-damaged gymnasium.
OPINION
April 12, 2010
Anti-drug tactics Re "Crackdown to target skid row drug dealers," April 8 When I see the Los Angeles Police Department make a public spectacle of addressing the "drug problem" by going after a handful of retail dealers in the poorest neighborhood in our city, I am reminded of the therapeutic value of putting a Band-Aid on a sore created by metastasized cancer. Drug dealing is organized at an international, national and statewide level. Focusing on the bottom rung of the distribution ladder demonstrates only the incapacity of the LAPD to address a much more deeply rooted problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2010 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California must refund about $38 million to professional degree students who were illegally charged fee increases after they started school in 2003, a Superior Court judge in San Francisco ruled Friday. UC is likely to appeal the decision, officials said. In the ruling, Judge John E. Munter said that several thousand UC students in law, medicine, nursing and other programs were, in effect, promised that their professional school fees would not rise during their enrollments and that the university violated that pledge.
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