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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A scholarship check doesn't guarantee a diploma. The East Los Angeles Community Union Scholarship, which has given money to more than 3,000 Latino students in the last 18 years, learned the hard way. "Even though a lot of our young men and women had the financial resources, they were still going the first and second year in college and then they were dropping out," said David Lizarraga, president of the organization.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Claudia Buck
SACRAMENTO — Two kids, two college tuitions. Add it up: One very big college bill. For John and Ellen Wong of Sacramento and many other parents, paying for college is no trivial expense. With two teenagers heading to campus this fall, the couple's total annual tab is about $66,000. That's roughly Ellen Wong's entire annual salary as a public high school instructor. "We've been saving since they were babies," said Ellen Wong, who said the couple are determined to get their kids through college without relying on student loans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1997 | VANESSA DeRUYTER
Despite some improvement, tighter controls are needed on student body funds at high schools in the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District, according to an annual independent auditors' report. The report, recently presented to district trustees, found that student body leaders are often late in depositing checks, and that money is sometimes left unguarded. Auditors also found negative balances in four campus club accounts monitored by associated student body groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A scholarship check doesn't guarantee a diploma. The East Los Angeles Community Union Scholarship, which has given money to more than 3,000 Latino students in the last 18 years, learned the hard way. "Even though a lot of our young men and women had the financial resources, they were still going the first and second year in college and then they were dropping out," said David Lizarraga, president of the organization.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992
For those who are interested in doing their own searches for financial aid, several books and software programs are available. Most are updated annually. Among the resources available: "Don't Miss Out: The Ambitious Student's Guide to Financial Aid." By Robert and Anna Leider. To order, send a check or money order for $7.75 to Octameron Associates, P.O. Box 2748, Alexandria, Va. 22301. "The College Cost Book" and related software, "College Cost Explorer." Published by the College Board.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | MINERVA CANTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many entrepreneurs, Connie Cooper set up her business on a shoestring budget. Her start-up company was different from most, however: It sought not just to make money, but to find it. Cooper's College Financial Planners in Anaheim specializes in securing funding for students. For a fee, it offers comprehensive financial-aid planning for college students and is one of only a handful of such businesses in the nation.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
If you ran up significant debts while paying for your college education, now may be the time to consider refinancing or consolidating your guaranteed student loans. Unless you believe that loan rates will probably drop more, there are few disadvantages to such a move, and the advantages can be substantial. What are the advantages? You may be able to lock in a reasonably low rate, reduce the number of checks you write each month and, if needed, extend repayment terms to lower your monthly outlay.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | CLAUDIA LUTHER and BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writers
When most of today's college students were in diapers, or perhaps not even born, a state law was passed that was the child of the '60s protest era. Though widely considered unconstitutional, the 18-year-old law was in effect until a group of Cal State Fullerton students successfully took it upon themselves this year to get it repealed. As a result of their efforts, Gov. George Deukmejian earlier this month signed a bill repealing the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997
If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning, I'd hammer in the evening, all over this land. . . . --Pete Seeger and Lee Hays Since Maria Molina's father first showed her how to remove an engine from a car, the 21-year-old Los Angeles Trade-Technical College student says she has known she was destined to be an auto mechanic. The South-Central Los Angeles woman has excelled in her classes and already has a job lined up after she graduates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has awarded grants and scholarships of up to $5,000 to four educational institutions in Third World countries. The schools are the National Film and Television Institute in Ghana, the Film and Television Institute of India, the Kenya Institute of Mass Communication and the University of the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Catholic Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization that provides Catholic school tuition to poor families in the Los Angeles area, will award a record $4.5 million in scholarships for the coming school year. The awards will help disadvantaged families send 4,700 children to 227 Catholic elementary and high schools in Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1999 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After four arduous years at the USC School of Medicine, Renee Sabshin is within months of becoming a doctor. But with $180,000 in school loans, the soon-to-be psychiatrist fears for her financial future. For at least the next four years, the 31-year-old will earn between $30,000 and $40,000 a year as a resident. That's hardly enough to pare down her debt or to allow her to move from her $650-a-month studio apartment to a larger space. "I'll be a doctor, and all I want is a bedroom," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At $12 per unit, California community colleges offer the nation's cheapest college education--one that is expected to get even cheaper with the Legislature's passage of a proposal to reduce fees for the second year in a row. But although low fees are popular with students and lawmakers, they are criticized by some policy experts who say that contrary to intent, California's rock-bottom community college prices work against the interests of low-income students.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1999 | From Reuters
U.S. college students are increasingly burdened with credit card debt, according to a study released Tuesday. The consequences can be serious, ranging from higher dropout rates to future employment problems and even suicide. The study by Georgetown University sociologist Robert Manning blamed credit card issuers for actively targeting students and colleges for allowing them to do so, sometimes in return for a cut of the profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1997 | VANESSA DeRUYTER
Despite some improvement, tighter controls are needed on student body funds at high schools in the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District, according to an annual independent auditors' report. The report, recently presented to district trustees, found that student body leaders are often late in depositing checks, and that money is sometimes left unguarded. Auditors also found negative balances in four campus club accounts monitored by associated student body groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997
If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning, I'd hammer in the evening, all over this land. . . . --Pete Seeger and Lee Hays Since Maria Molina's father first showed her how to remove an engine from a car, the 21-year-old Los Angeles Trade-Technical College student says she has known she was destined to be an auto mechanic. The South-Central Los Angeles woman has excelled in her classes and already has a job lined up after she graduates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1993 | LYNDA NATALI
Local youngsters who want to go to college this summer but can't muster the tuition can now get some help toward that end. Full and partial scholarships are available for children and youths between the ages of 3 and 18 who want to attend Orange Coast College's College for Kids Program. Starting June 14, youngsters can go to college and take a variety of classes, from lifesaving techniques to reading development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Los Alamitos Unified School District, which was forced to scale back bus service because of a new state directive and budget deficits, will hold a lottery to fill 70 remaining seats on the revamped service. The budget problems arose when the state ruled that school districts could no longer charge parents for bus service, forcing the Los Alamitos district to cut back service to high school and middle schools.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the state of not being aggressive enough with deadbeat ex-students, U.S. education officials are demanding a $49-million refund from California for failure to collect on thousands of federally insured college loans, The Times has learned. The U.S. Department of Education requested the refund in March from the California Student Aid Commission, the agency charged with making the collections. David A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1993 | MICHAEL S. McPHERSON and MORTON OWEN SCHAPIRO, Michael S. McPherson is a professor of economics at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. Morton Owen Schapiro is professor and chairman of the economics department at USC. They are co-authors of "Keeping College Affordable: Government and Educational Opportunity" (Brookings Institution, 1991).
The real question in the debate about how to provide student loans is not: Do we want bureaucrats running the program? The question instead is: Do we want those bureaucrats to be bankers? The Clinton Administration wants to stop funneling federal student loans through banks, proposing instead to provide the loan money to students directly. This plan came closer to reality with its recent approval by the House of Representatives.
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