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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noxious fumes emanating from a nearby bus yard sickened 38 students at Sun Valley Middle School on Friday, sending 20 of them to area hospitals for treatment, authorities said. All 20 were all expected to be treated and released. The fumes, which officials believe emanated from an area where school buses are steam-cleaned, were harmless, Los Angeles Fire Department Assistant Chief Michael Fulmis said. "It was just a bad, stinky odor."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
State and federal officials are evaluating whether to give students at UC Santa Barbara an unlicensed vaccine to prevent further spread of a bacterial meningitis outbreak on campus. The California state and Santa Barbara County departments of public health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the university confirmed Friday that they are working together to determine if Bexsero, a vaccine against type B meningococcal disease that is not yet approved for use in the U.S., would be effective against the particular type of meningitis that sickened four students in November.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Los Angeles schools Supt. Roy Romer and teachers' union President Day Higuchi endorsed legislation by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) that would establish a student health insurance program, giving low-income public school students free health insurance. Students in the free school lunch program would be eligible for the insurance plan, for those whose families live at or below 130% of the federal poverty level, about $22,945 a year for a family of four. From Times Staff Reports
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
UC Riverside officials are in the process of notifying anyone on campus who may have had contact with a student advisor who was diagnosed with meningitis this past weekend. A campus spokeswoman confirmed Monday that the advisor has been hospitalized, but the severity of the case is unknown. The announcement came days after UC Santa Barbara announced a fourth case of meningitis among its students. While most were expected to fully recover, one of them, a freshman lacrosse player, had to have his feet amputated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1994 | BILL BILLITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In response to an upsurge in tuberculosis cases in Orange County, health officials have ordered expanded testing of students this fall. * The new policy requires TB testing of students from outside Orange County who transfer into any public or private school in the county. State law already requires TB testing of all students entering the first grade. The county's new policy expands the testing to cover grades one through 12, if the student is moving into Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1995 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 200 Orange County high school and community college students and their teachers will be tested for tuberculosis beginning today because they were in classes with two students diagnosed with the infectious disease. About 107 students and teachers at Bolsa Grande High School in Garden Grove will be tested on campus today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN and JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Parents lining up at the medical clinic at Columbus Middle School in Canoga Park want to volunteer as classroom aides, but must first pass a tuberculosis skin test. At Manual Arts High School in South-Central Los Angeles, a student who recently delivered a baby waits to speak to a doctor about contraceptives. And at San Fernando High School, teenagers stream into a cramped medical clinic for everything from headaches to acne to depression. Many are indigent and without health insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1992 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With most Orange County schools set to open in less than two weeks, the fall back-to-school rituals are well under way. There are shopping trips for new lunch boxes and pencils and the less-pleasant outings to receive immunizations required for entering school. The mandatory inoculations are DTP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis), MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and oral vaccine for polio. Each series requires two or more doses over varying periods of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Believing that a good education begins with healthy students, seven northeast Valley schools have joined together to apply for a $250,000 grant from the state Department of Education, hoping to turn their campuses into miniature community service centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors today will seek federal authorities' approval to include students across the county in an innovative plan designed to provide basic medical services for students in Los Angeles schools. The program could funnel as much as $90 million into treating basic maladies before they turn into more severe ailments.
SPORTS
June 3, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
The Pac-12 on Monday announced an initiative to help improve the health and safety of its more than 7,000 athletes. Here's the full press release . The elements of the initiative include  "Head Trauma Task Force" and "Football Contact Reduction. " The Pac-12 will establish a task force to study head trauma and "find ways to limit damage and exposure to  student-athletes. " The football contact initiative will look to study and monitor contact at practice. A final policy will be released at the Pac-12 Football Media Day on July 26. "Pac-12 institutions house the leading medical trainers, doctors, and scientists working to enhance student-athlete health and well-being,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said in the release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius visited a health clinic in downtown Los Angeles on Monday and announced more than $9 million in funding to help medical students repay school loans if they agree to work in underserved areas. Sebelius said the program will encourage more students to pursue careers in family medicine and will help relieve a shortage of primary care doctors. "Most Americans who live in underserved areas don't have access to basic care," she said during the visit to Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center.
HEALTH
January 16, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The 17-year-old boy who came into Cathy Owens' nursing office at Murrieta Valley High School in Riverside County was gasping for breath. He had no history of health problems. After quickly examining him, Owens' 35 years of experience kicked in. "He was not able to breathe, and there was no heart rate going," she recalls. "All I could think of was he was suffering from anaphylaxis. " Often the result of a severe food allergy, anaphylaxis can be lethal if not treated within minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2009 | Larry Gordon
The recent arrest of a UCLA student in the brutal stabbing of a classmate in a campus chemistry lab has again focused attention on an issue that gripped the nation after the 2007 massacre at Virginia Tech: the mental health of troubled college students. The Virginia Tech shootings, which left 32 victims and the gunman dead, raised difficult questions about how a disturbed student could have been allowed to remain at the school despite danger signs. Since then, campuses in California and around the country say they watch their students ever more closely for signs of possible mental illness or other problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2006 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Say "squishy-squashy" and students immediately know what to do in the model physical education program at Van Nuys Middle School. It means "move in close enough to touch somebody, but don't," one administrator explained. The command is an attention-getting time-saver -- before or after a physical activity -- when teachers need to be heard. But metaphorically, the invented word could apply to P.E. in the Los Angeles Unified School District as a whole. Squishy-squashy could stand for oversized P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2003 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
When Janis Lake heard the Los Angeles County supervisors cast their votes a year ago, her heart immediately sank. The county-funded student health clinic at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills would be shut for good due to budget cuts. With the 2002-2003 school year about to start, Lake knew that something had to be done to save the clinic, where an average of 15 students, nearly all of them uninsured, would come each day to receive free medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT and DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite their commitment to remove social services from public schools, the Orange Unified School Board on Thursday narrowly accepted a grant to provide medical care for some low-income students. But they vowed to draft a policy to scrutinize all future grants for services which the board contends the family should provide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1995
A clinic for students opened Wednesday at Second Street Elementary School in Boyle Heights, the result of a partnership between White Memorial Medical Center, a nonprofit private hospital, and the Los Angeles Unified School District. The new health care center is the first of its kind in the school district, according to hospital officials, and will be able to provide free medical services three days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Against the backdrop of the Ventura school district's first farm-fresh salad bar, community leaders joined Tuesday to urge legislators and other policymakers to take a tougher stand against a rising tide of children showing up to school overweight and out of shape. That message was bolstered by the release of a new study that chronicled a surge in childhood obesity and other health problems in three coastal California counties.
HEALTH
July 22, 2002 | LINDA REID CHASSIAKOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When my mother's generation went to college, parents sent their sons and daughters off knowing that strict dress codes, curfews and rules of conduct were the order of the day. Universities operated under the mandate of in loco parentis, "in place of a parent, with a parent's duties and responsibilities." My generation, the baby boomers, triggered a radical change in the relationship between students and university administrators.
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