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NEWS
February 1, 1989
A proposal to allow gay and lesbian couples to live in married-student housing is being considered by UC Berkeley lawyers and administrators before being submitted to Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman, according to a campus housing official. Proponents of the proposal claim that UC policy against discrimination based on sexual orientation makes the rule allowing only legally married couples in that housing unfair to homosexual couples.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
University Gateway, high-end private student housing across the street from USC, has sold for more than $200 million to a Wisconsin public employees pension fund. The eight-story complex at 3335 S. Figueroa St. was completed in 2010 by Los Angeles developer Urban Partners, which owned it with real estate investors RCG Longview and Blackstone Real Estate Advisors. Its appraised value prior to the sale was $89 million, according to real estate data provider CoStar. University Gateway has 421 units with 1,656 beds available for rent.
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NEWS
February 26, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newest campus housing at the University of Colorado features dirt floors, stone walls, mud roofs and a special place for visiting medicine men. Tucked between high-rise dormitories and the university president's mansion, three Navajo hogans are part of a radical experiment in architecture, solar energy and anthropology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
A planned $1.1-billion makeover of a faded shopping center near USC into much-needed student housing and retail space was put on hold by a Los Angeles City Council land-use committee Tuesday after community groups protested the project's potential negative impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. After listening to three hours of debate, the Planning and Land Use Management Committee asked for more information about how other major universities have handled community concerns during major upgrades - including fears that low-income residents could be displaced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
Southern California College this week announced plans to convert a dilapidated motel on Newport Boulevard into dormitories. The small Christian campus bought the boarded-up Coastal Inn Motel at Newport Boulevard and Mesa Drive last month for $685,000 and hopes to refurbish it to house married students, according to Jerry Clarke, director of plant operations. The 1,200-student campus currently provides 680 beds in 340 dorm rooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | MIMI KO
Fraternities and sororities at UC Irvine have long sought a place where their members could live together and call it home. Come fall of 1993, many of the school's "Greeks" will have those homes in the form of two- and three-story dormitory houses that they can lease. Located at the far east corner of campus, the residences will be part a $16.5-million project that will provide housing for student groups whose members wish to live together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1993 | JILL LEOVY
For students, faculty and staff who live in apartments run by the Cal State Northridge Foundation, recent notice of $25- and $30-per-month rent increases was one blow too many in a year of tough breaks. "We've been hit left and right, and I don't see why we should be hit again from our own university," said resident Robert Marshall, an archivist with the university who helped gather nearly 100 signatures from residents asking CSUN President Blenda J. Wilson to intervene.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students protested both for and against it, and some alumni canceled gifts over it. But Stanford University trustees stood their ground and recently reaffirmed a new policy that opens campus housing and other benefits to unmarried students who live together. The policy, considered one of the broadest in the nation, allows couples--both straight and gay--to apply for the relatively low-cost apartments once reserved for married students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1987
July Olson of the Verano Renters Assn. of UC Irvine housing intimates that members of her association deserve to pay $325 to $640 less than the market rent for apartments in the area because they are students and can't afford to pay any more, and because they earn less money than those "fortunates" who are out trying to make a living. My questions to Olson are: Who forced you into your "predicament" of a college education, and who do you think is paying for your subsidized housing?
BUSINESS
October 3, 2010 | By Jennifer Waters
The housing market is still in the tank, but there are investment opportunities in one segment: student housing. It's not a risk-free proposition, and it's far more management-intensive than conventional multifamily properties. But student housing has a long history of growth and stability. "Demand and supply conditions for housing are bad," said David Stiff, chief economist with Fiserv, which publishes the Case-Shiller Home Price Index. "But in college towns, demand conditions are slightly better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Lower Nob Hill, a once stately neighborhood whose shifting fortunes have proved a draw over the years for prostitutes and petty crooks, is buzzing with new activity. The Academy of Art University has snatched up nine apartment buildings and former hotels in the enclave, converting them into dorms for students who pack the neighborhood's cafes and linger on the sidewalks to smoke and skateboard. Private landlords have gotten in on the action, renting to students who, city officials say, pay as much as 20% more for their lodgings than permanent residents do. But with the average rent for a San Francisco studio apartment hovering around $2,000, Lower Nob Hill and the institution that transformed it are Exhibit A in a pointed policy debate over student housing.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Southwestern Law School, which occupies one of Los Angeles' most famous buildings, has announced plans to expand its quarters with construction of student housing. The move marks a breakthrough in the evolution of the century-old institution into a law school with an authentic 24-hour campus, officials said. Southwestern expects to start work in December on a $20-million project to create 133 apartments, an outdoor courtyard and underground parking next to the school's two main buildings.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2010 | By Jennifer Waters
The housing market is still in the tank, but there are investment opportunities in one segment: student housing. It's not a risk-free proposition, and it's far more management-intensive than conventional multifamily properties. But student housing has a long history of growth and stability. "Demand and supply conditions for housing are bad," said David Stiff, chief economist with Fiserv, which publishes the Case-Shiller Home Price Index. "But in college towns, demand conditions are slightly better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2010 | By Jeff Gottlieb
It was about 10 years ago that Marymount College asked Rancho Palos Verdes to approve a campus remodel, a makeover that would include a new library and gym and bring student housing to the ocean-view campus for the first time. Now, angry at what it says is the agonizingly slow pace of gaining approval for the more than $50-million project, the small Catholic college has decided to take the issue directly to the city's voters with an initiative on the November ballot. Marymount's move is unprecedented in Rancho Palos Verdes, a town of about 42,000 people with multimillion-dollar homes, spectacular ocean views and modest political campaigns.
HOME & GARDEN
November 29, 2008 | Jeff Spurrier, Spurrier is a freelance writer.
Just a few miles from multimillion-dollar homes in this central Mexican resort town, the countryside yields to dirt-floor lean-tos made of sticks, rocks, cardboard, blankets or tarps. If residents are lucky, they have a panel of sheet metal as the roof. Out here in the campo, most have no running water, no electricity, no sewer system, no paved roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2007 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
USC joined in a federal lawsuit, filed Tuesday, that alleged a developer of off-campus student housing was trying to squelch competition with intimidation, extortion and fraud. Conquest Student Housing, a firm that owns numerous apartments in the neighborhoods near USC, is illegally trying to stop construction of a rival's project, University Gateway, that would house more than 1,600 students and include retail stores, a fitness center and a parking structure, according to the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rats have eaten food, nested in cabinets and multiplied in about 50 of 197 apartments at UC Santa Cruz's family student housing complex. The cause is unclear, but a fox family has disappeared from the area, some killed by rat poison, said grounds supervisor Rich Berger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1998
In "College Students Cramming--Into Dorms" (Sept. 28), the pictures speak for the entire article: The UCLA freshman is trying to figure out where to put all of her stuff in a room meant for two people, but housing three, while USC students kick back in a hotel Jacuzzi at their makeshift dorm rooms. As a public relations major at USC, I am insulted at the picture that was literally painted of the housing situation at our school. The students living in the Radisson are paying more per semester than the on-campus students; they receive the same amount of maid service as an on-campus dorm dweller--an occasional wipe-down of the bathroom; they do not receive the pampering normal hotel guests do. Students are required to bring their own bedding.
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2007 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
THERE was a time when the university dorm was the great equalizer. It didn't matter if you were on a scholarship or a trust fund. You still had to put up with communal bathrooms, florescent light, windows that didn't open, cinder-block construction. Things have changed. To start, don't call them dorms. Now they're residence halls, and the archetypal cramped room has morphed into a suite, bringing with it once-unimaginable amenities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Attracting the best and brightest is a top priority for any major university, but UC Santa Barbara recruiters face a stacked deck: astronomical housing prices that sticker-shock the brightest luminaries. "Many of our faculty can't afford housing, and when faculty leave, the No. 1 reason is lack of affordable housing," said Donna Carpenter, vice chancellor of administrative services.
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