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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Reuters
Student protesters have widened a campaign to obstruct oil production in the Indian state of Assam after New Delhi threatened tough action against them, an official said Thursday. Assam's Home Minister Bhrigu Kumar Phukan said members of the All Assam Students Union had formed a human chain around all six crude-pumping stations in the northeastern state, preventing employees from working.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
As their countries headed toward victory and disappointment in the final hour of the much-anticipated Cricket World Cup 2011 semifinal match, Waleed Ishtiaq and Nikunj Jajodia were dozing side by side. Wearing their respective countries' team colors — green for Pakistan and blue for India — the 20-year-old USC students had nodded off in their chairs at an on-campus screening of the game. Not even the intermittent cheering of their compatriots could rouse them. It was past 10 a.m. Wednesday in Los Angeles when India took the prize, after a nail-biting eight-hour contest.
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NEWS
October 20, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monica Chadha, a 19-year-old student, looked up from her morning newspaper, which described a rash of protest suicides by Indian teen-agers, and announced that she was going to kill herself. Monica "told us she was going to burn herself to death--just like that," her elder sister Sonia recalled the other day. "I told her, 'Monica, come on, you're joking.' And she said, 'No, it's not a joke. I am very serious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2005 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
It started with 13 books, written by children for children. That's how fourth-grade teacher Ann-Marie Dorman first connected her students at Ojai Valley School with the splendor and sorrow of India, having them pen stories last year to create a library for a school in the slums of New Delhi.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
They were students, so they came seeking answers. Why did the U.S. attack Saddam Hussein's regime but not other dictatorships? Why did the U.S. preach free trade but close some of its markets to developing countries? Why is it OK for the U.S. to have nuclear weapons but not other nations? For 30 minutes, college students handpicked from India's leading universities fired questions. For 30 minutes, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell put up a wide-ranging defense.
NEWS
December 6, 1994
What does it take to cover the story of India's 900 million people? Try three months, 19 roving photography students and nearly 5,000 rolls of film. That's what Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara did when it sent the photo-documentary students abroad last summer. Whitney Old (left, with cattle) and other Brooks students fanned across the country, from strife-torn Kashmir to the rugged Himalayas to bustling Bombay.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Armed Sikh separatists stormed one of the country's most prestigious engineering colleges before dawn Friday, killing 19 students asleep in a dormitory, police said. The militants, armed with Chinese-made AK-47 rifles, entered Thapar Engineering College and knocked on the door of the dormitory, said a police spokesman. When one of the students opened the door, the gunmen opened fire, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2005 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
It started with 13 books, written by children for children. That's how fourth-grade teacher Ann-Marie Dorman first connected her students at Ojai Valley School with the splendor and sorrow of India, having them pen stories last year to create a library for a school in the slums of New Delhi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
As their countries headed toward victory and disappointment in the final hour of the much-anticipated Cricket World Cup 2011 semifinal match, Waleed Ishtiaq and Nikunj Jajodia were dozing side by side. Wearing their respective countries' team colors — green for Pakistan and blue for India — the 20-year-old USC students had nodded off in their chairs at an on-campus screening of the game. Not even the intermittent cheering of their compatriots could rouse them. It was past 10 a.m. Wednesday in Los Angeles when India took the prize, after a nail-biting eight-hour contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
For the third year in a row, the Tustin High School Model United Nations team has participated in the annual Bath Schools Model U.N. conference in England. And just like it did two years ago, the Tustin team took home the coveted silver plate, the top delegation award, said team member Michael Yang. Tustin delegates and their advisors also won nine individual awards, Yang said. Model United Nations is an academic debate program that simulates the proceedings and business of the U.N.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
They were students, so they came seeking answers. Why did the U.S. attack Saddam Hussein's regime but not other dictatorships? Why did the U.S. preach free trade but close some of its markets to developing countries? Why is it OK for the U.S. to have nuclear weapons but not other nations? For 30 minutes, college students handpicked from India's leading universities fired questions. For 30 minutes, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell put up a wide-ranging defense.
NEWS
December 6, 1994
What does it take to cover the story of India's 900 million people? Try three months, 19 roving photography students and nearly 5,000 rolls of film. That's what Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara did when it sent the photo-documentary students abroad last summer. Whitney Old (left, with cattle) and other Brooks students fanned across the country, from strife-torn Kashmir to the rugged Himalayas to bustling Bombay.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monica Chadha, a 19-year-old student, looked up from her morning newspaper, which described a rash of protest suicides by Indian teen-agers, and announced that she was going to kill herself. Monica "told us she was going to burn herself to death--just like that," her elder sister Sonia recalled the other day. "I told her, 'Monica, come on, you're joking.' And she said, 'No, it's not a joke. I am very serious.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Reuters
Student protesters have widened a campaign to obstruct oil production in the Indian state of Assam after New Delhi threatened tough action against them, an official said Thursday. Assam's Home Minister Bhrigu Kumar Phukan said members of the All Assam Students Union had formed a human chain around all six crude-pumping stations in the northeastern state, preventing employees from working.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Armed Sikh separatists stormed one of the country's most prestigious engineering colleges before dawn Friday, killing 19 students asleep in a dormitory, police said. The militants, armed with Chinese-made AK-47 rifles, entered Thapar Engineering College and knocked on the door of the dormitory, said a police spokesman. When one of the students opened the door, the gunmen opened fire, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2007 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
For the sixth year in a row, USC enrolled more foreign students than any other American university, according to a report being released today. USC had 7,115 international students last year, followed by Columbia University with 5,937, and New York University with 5,827. UCLA was in eighth place with 4,704. The annual Open Door report, published by the Institute of International Education with support from the U.S. State Department, showed that the number of international students enrolled at U.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Microsoft Corp. said Thursday that it would build on existing efforts to bridge the digital divide worldwide and announced several new ventures, including a $3 software package for governments that subsidize student computers.
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