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NEWS
February 9, 1991
A class of Minnesota fourth-graders paid a visit to Sami Rasouli's delicatessen recently, to show the IRAQI BAKER that they--not the people who threatened his life last month--are typical Americans. The students in St. Louis Park wrote letters of sorrow and support after reading about four bomb threats Rasouli had received. In thanks, Rasouli invited the students for a LUNCH OF GYROS AND BAKLAVA.
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NEWS
February 9, 1991
A class of Minnesota fourth-graders paid a visit to Sami Rasouli's delicatessen recently, to show the IRAQI BAKER that they--not the people who threatened his life last month--are typical Americans. The students in St. Louis Park wrote letters of sorrow and support after reading about four bomb threats Rasouli had received. In thanks, Rasouli invited the students for a LUNCH OF GYROS AND BAKLAVA.
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NEWS
January 13, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
The latest school catalogue to hit town is as slick as a sales brochure and boastful as a college recruiting pamphlet, promising a rich and stimulating blend of academic and extracurricular choices--day care, international studies programs, vocational training. The publisher? The local public schools, kindergarten through high school. That is no misprint. The public schools.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
The latest school catalogue to hit town is as slick as a sales brochure and boastful as a college recruiting pamphlet, promising a rich and stimulating blend of academic and extracurricular choices--day care, international studies programs, vocational training. The publisher? The local public schools, kindergarten through high school. That is no misprint. The public schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | JANIS T. GABAY, Janis T. Gabay, an English teacher at Junipero Serra High School in San Diego, is 1990 National Teacher of the Year. and
Over the last decade, amid the noise of honking yellow school buses, ringing bells, banging lockers and the giggles and chatter of children, there has been an uproar over the dismal state of education in America. This year, the opening of school will be markedly different for a change--at least on TV. This week, three specials present a welcome realistic view of what is being done to address the education crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999
Gov. Gray Davis' request earlier this month that California colleges make community service a graduation requirement is unassailable in principle. What could be wrong with teaching students, as the governor puts it, that "a service ethic . . . [has] lasting value in California"?
SPORTS
May 6, 1987 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Southern Section rules limiting the number of high school teammates who may play on the same non-school team during the school year are the most restrictive outside-competition rules in California. But they are only moderately restrictive in comparison to those in other states. Students in Minnesota and Ohio are not permitted to play on outside teams at any time during the school year, unless they are members of a national team or an Olympic development program.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In El Dorado County, the Community School will open its doors from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. with an academic program aimed exclusively at students for whom traditional methods have failed. In Sonoma, a new public campus will be modeled on a system of private education started in Europe shortly after the turn of the century. And in San Bernardino County, parents at Yucca Mesa Elementary School will sign contracts agreeing to participate in campus life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott Lay had a choice: keep paying $300 telephone bills, or jump on the on-line computer bandwagon. To a 21-year-old college Democrat on a tight budget with a need to network with other young politicians, it was an easy decision. Now when Lay finishes a few hours of work at a local hospital, he sits down at his PC to write his quasi-weekly, late-night political catharsis for the world to read.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Walsh taught in Gilmer County, Ga., until he was accused of molesting boys. But there was no indictment, so Walsh moved on to Oconee County, where he worked as a substitute teacher. There, three boys accused him of touching them on the buttocks and crotch. But no one could prove it, and nobody reported it to the state, and Walsh moved on to Social Circle Elementary School. It was his third school in two years, and it was the place his teaching career ended.
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