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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Less than 24 hours after "Tommyland," Tommy Lee's autobiography detailing his life of sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll and police run-ins, hit bookstores last month, he was busted. Again. The notorious rocker's latest scrap did not go down outside a Sunset Strip nightclub. Drugs and alcohol were not involved. Groupies, paparazzi and ex-wife Pamela Anderson were nowhere in sight. The incident didn't even wind up on "Entertainment Tonight."
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SPORTS
June 27, 1985 | Jim Murray
Every so often, I am enormously cheered to see something happen to attest to the infinite capacity of the human being for self-deception. I like to see guys going down after the Loch Ness Monster. Fat people entering the Boston Marathon. Drunks trying to climb the Matterhorn. I'm relieved to see people believe Rambo is getting everything straightened out over in Southeast Asia, and I can't help applauding guys who bet and raise into pat hands or play pool with guys carrying their own cues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999
I was interested in reading Dana Parsons' Nov. 28 column about the Gay-Straight Alliance club proposed for El Modena High School. My daughter is one of the two students who have been forced to file a lawsuit to protect her civil rights. Please don't call the students litigious. That refers to people who file lawsuits right and left at the drop of a hat. Believe me, that's not the case here. This is a well-thought-out action. Parsons holds the same misconception as many who just say, "Why can't they meet off campus?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1999 | JUSTIN DAVIDSON, NEWSDAY
If Pierre Boulez has his way--and he often does--the concert hall of the future will be a place to spend a weekend day. "Right now, an orchestra is like a restaurant," said Boulez, perhaps the 20th century's most formidable and influential composer-conductor-administrator. "It opens at 8, closes at 10, and what happens the rest of the time is of no interest to the public. But people should be able to come and spend the whole day, the way they do in a museum."
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writers
Staring intently at the small computer screen, Adrian Monarrez, 16, put the finishing touches on the curved tail of a hideous-looking basilisk, a mythical monster that is hatched from an egg and turns people to stone with its icy stare. "There are some irregularities," the Bell High School junior said as he slowly rolled the computer's "mouse" remote device on the table, selected a mode on the computer's menu and began painting the basilisk's tail, dot by dot, until it curved evenly.
NEWS
July 18, 1985 | RALPH CIPRIANO, Times Staff Writer
Midway through her freshman year at college, 17-year-old Helen Peterson took an extended break between semesters. When she returned, she was a grandmother in her 60s. Peterson, now Helen Peterson Tredway of Downey, began her college career at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1933, where she wore felt plush hats, gloves and dresses to class.
SPORTS
September 5, 1992 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The joke was that you needed a passport to enter Nebraska's campus on football Saturdays. It was quaint. It was foreign. It was so . . . Midwestern. A real beam-me-up-Scotty experience if you were making your first visit. Memorial Stadium became it's own sovereign nation on those days. Swelled to capacity with thousands of polite, red-clad, Cornhusker-crazed followers, the place had a certain bizarre innocence to it.
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