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August 23, 1988
A street-preaching 11-year-old was suspended for 10 days on the first day of school in Marion, N.C., after reportedly telling his principal to "go to hell." David Strode, said his son, Duffey, had told Jim Gorst, principal of Eastfield Elementary School, "you'll go to hell." School officials said the boy's message was a more blunt "you go to hell."
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NEWS
August 23, 1988
A street-preaching 11-year-old was suspended for 10 days on the first day of school in Marion, N.C., after reportedly telling his principal to "go to hell." David Strode, said his son, Duffey, had told Jim Gorst, principal of Eastfield Elementary School, "you'll go to hell." School officials said the boy's message was a more blunt "you go to hell."
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MAGAZINE
September 3, 2000
Craig Masback, CEO of USA Track and Field, likes to boast that Marion Jones "has the chance to be the first female international athlete to transcend sports . . . only three people have done that: Pele, Muhammad Ali and Michael Jordan" ("Just Do It," by Mike Penner, Aug. 6). Sorry, but that's one race where Jones won't be the first woman across the finish line. That distinction already belongs to the amazing Billie Jean King, who blazed trails in social change before Jones was even born.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2007 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
At Prairie View A&M and North Carolina A&T universities, the marching bands are well-oiled machines and a source of enormous pride. The football teams -- not so much. Bands and football squads squared off Saturday at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, highlighting a festival that was really about marketing the historically black colleges and raising their profiles on the West Coast.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Carly Fiorina, fired as Hewlett-Packard Co.'s chief executive in February, said she had "no regrets" about her five years at the helm of the world's largest printer maker. In her first public appearance since her ouster, Fiorina told students of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in a commencement address Saturday that she is "at peace" and her "soul is intact."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Clara M. Luper, a black civil rights activist in Oklahoma whose early leadership of lunch counter sit-ins helped break down racial barriers at restaurants and diners nearly two years before the Greensboro, N.C., sit-ins captured national attention in 1960, died of natural causes Wednesday at her home in Oklahoma City, her family said. She was 88. Luper's role in civil rights history began with a Greyhound bus trip to New York City in 1957. A high school history teacher, Luper had written a play called "Brother President," about the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the leader of the successful Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1987 | AMIRI BARAKA
"A Raisin in the Sun" opens at the Wilshire Theatre on April 1, starring Esther Rolle as the grandmother determined to move her family out of their tenement apartment. Amiri Baraka (playwright LeRoi Jones) saw the production in Washington recently and had a profoundly different reaction to "Raisin" than when he first saw it at the turn of the militant 1960s.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Americans are clearly captivated by what they perceive to be reality on television, with an average 25 million viewers a week tuning in to the hit "Survivor" on CBS, and as many as 11 million to the same network's "Big Brother." Why, then, are the televised Republican and Democratic national conventions--two events that officially launch the presidential race--such a poor draw with viewers?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1995 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ralph Johns vividly remembers the day 35 years ago when four black students staged a sit-in at a whites-only lunch counter at a Greensboro, N.C., Woolworth's store. For years he had been trying to persuade black students to commit such an act, recalled Johns, 79, a La Habra resident who then owned a clothing store in Greensboro, where he served as the first white vice president of the local chapter of the NAACP, organizing numerous demonstrations to promote human rights.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RALEIGH, N.C. - Saying he sees possible “breakthrough” year for the U.S. economy, President Obama on Wednesday touted a new manufacturing technology institute in the Research Triangle, an election-year attempt to show he can advance his agenda without his Republican opponents in Congress. “Today, I'm here to act,” Obama told students at North Carolina State University, the leading partner behind the new innovation initiative. The goal, he said, was “to help make Raleigh-Durham and America a magnet for the good high-tech manufacturing jobs that a growing middle class requires and that are going to continue to keep this country on the cutting edge.” The consortium, a public-private partnership involving 18 companies, will focus on developing semiconductor technology used in energy-efficient products.
SPORTS
February 5, 1998 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So little separates Duke and North Carolina. Only an 11-mile stretch of Highway 15-501--and these days, the mere 41 points out of 1,734 by which No. 2 North Carolina trails No. 1 Duke in the Associated Press poll. Close? The Nos. 1 and 2 men's basketball teams in the nation even share an I-40 exit. Turn left to the Duke campus, right for Chapel Hill. It's a rivalry embedded so deeply that the unofficial final line of North Carolina's fight song is "Go to hell, Duke!"
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