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August 17, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sauntering out of the Ohio Bell Telephone Co. headquarters at lunchtime, a middle-aged man was greeted the other day by a familiar sight: 25 or so chanting demonstrators marching in a circle in front of the building. "This is becoming a Friday ritual," he said, stopping for a while to watch with a friend before moving on. The well-behaved demonstrators, who also have regularly targeted other downtown sites since their protest began June 29, are mostly Cleveland State University students.
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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sauntering out of the Ohio Bell Telephone Co. headquarters at lunchtime, a middle-aged man was greeted the other day by a familiar sight: 25 or so chanting demonstrators marching in a circle in front of the building. "This is becoming a Friday ritual," he said, stopping for a while to watch with a friend before moving on. The well-behaved demonstrators, who also have regularly targeted other downtown sites since their protest began June 29, are mostly Cleveland State University students.
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NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Classes were canceled Friday for nearly 73,000 students in Ohio's largest school district after teachers rejected a contract offer and set up picket lines. School officials and Cleveland Teachers Union members declined to discuss the school board's latest offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN
The president of California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks was one of five college presidents nationwide who has received grants of $100,000 from a private philanthropic foundation based in Florida. President Jerry H. Miller received one of the first Knight Foundation Presidential Discretionary Grants, given to leaders of small liberal arts colleges. The money may be spent at Cal Lutheran at his discretion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ike Pappas, 75, a longtime CBS newsman who reported the shooting death of suspected presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald on the radio as the crime was taking place, died Sunday of complications from heart disease in a hospital in Arlington, Va. Pappas was among the reporters at the Dallas police station waiting for Oswald to be moved two days after President Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Pappas had just asked him, "You have anything to say in your defense?" when the shot fired by nightclub owner Jack Ruby rang out. Pappas was standing next to Ruby when the gunman opened fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For most of America, the war in Iraq officially ended last week with a speech-laden ceremony in Baghdad. But for Karen Mendoza and the other 2,000-plus widows of U.S. military personnel killed in Baghdad, Fallouja, Ramadi and dozens of other cities and towns, the war in Iraq will never truly be over. "Being a widow is a full-time job," said Mendoza, whose husband, Marine Maj. Ray Mendoza, 37, was killed in November 2005 when he stepped on a land mine while leading Marines from Camp Pendleton into combat near the Syrian border.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | MARY JORDAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Every 15 minutes, members of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority threw open the doors of their elegant sorority house to welcome another nervous group of freshmen. The newcomers already had submitted their high school grades in writing to Alpha Chi and 18 other houses; today, they would be rated on looks and personality. "It's very nerve-racking," said Stefanie Blinderman, 17, an Ohio State University freshman from Long Island, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2001
Every so often a story pops up reporting on how city lawmakers intent on clearing up the clutter in their local ordinances vote to repeal a silly law passed long ago. Everyone usually laughs and wonders how that law ever got passed in the first place. Well, looking at some of the laws passed around Orange County in 2000 it's hard not to wonder whether years from now some future generation will be wondering why we were so exercised about some seemingly minor things.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2008 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
They rehearsed the chant for weeks. Finally, in a stately ballroom, they yelled it: "Hil-la-ry -- our no-mi-nee. H-R-C - to vic-to-ry!" Students from Ohio State University, alongside hundreds of other ebullient supporters, watched and cheered Hillary Rodham Clinton's exuberant victory speech Tuesday night at the Columbus Athenaeum after she won Ohio's Democratic primary. "We're going on, we're going strong, and we're going all the way," Clinton told the crowd packed into the Olympian ballroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Craig Owens' name is among those in 'The Witness Project.' He was a brilliant art critic--and he was a special friend. I think it was the second time I visited the exhibit "Devil on the Stairs: Looking Back on Art of the Eighties"--which closes Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum--that I felt a surge of pain, a sudden reminder of the death of someone I loved, inappropriately but sincerely, many years ago.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2003 | Tom Gorman, Times Staff Writer
It's more expensive now to get a divorce in Colorado and register an all-terrain vehicle in Maine, and it may soon cost more to buy ammunition in California and visit a brothel in Nevada. State politicians, loath to raise income and sales taxes, are adopting new fees and "nickel-and-dime" taxes, or increasing old ones, to generate tens of millions of dollars across the nation to make up budget deficits without angering the public.
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