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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Walking through a hallway at the Orange County Rescue Mission, 11-year-old Connie Chilton contrasted this world with the affluent neighborhoods where she and her classmates live. "It's very real," she said solemnly. "Where we live doesn't seem real compared to this. We don't have the problems they have here." Connie was among four classrooms of fifth- and sixth-grade students from Santiago Hills Elementary School in Irvine who toured the rescue mission Friday morning.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2001 | Tami Min, (714) 966-7410
Garden Grove Unified School students will help usher in the Year of the Snake during an Asian cultural event Thursday, leading up to the Jan. 24 celebration of Tet, the Vietnamese lunar New Year. Seventeen Tet Dance Team members from Los Amigos High School will perform a dragon dance during two assemblies Thursday at Monroe Elementary School in Fountain Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Daisondrai Harris imitated an anteater Saturday by using a straw to suck up bits of paper the size of postage stamps. The 5-year-old Cerritos boy said the task was easy enough. But would he want to be an anteater rather than a person? "No," he answered firmly. And why not? "Because they eat ants." Harris was one of hundreds of youngsters who participated in the Santa Ana Zoo's third Zoo Olympics on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Halloween, principals at Orange County schools have to balance the interests of students eager to dress up and celebrate against strict rules that generally ban masks and anything resembling a weapon, including plastic swords and squirt guns. For preschoolers, Halloween observances are sometimes encouraged, sometimes not. Some, like the Kindercare in Costa Mesa, have pre-Halloween costume parties with treats and activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1994 | BILL BILLITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In response to an upsurge in tuberculosis cases in Orange County, health officials have ordered expanded testing of students this fall. * The new policy requires TB testing of students from outside Orange County who transfer into any public or private school in the county. State law already requires TB testing of all students entering the first grade. The county's new policy expands the testing to cover grades one through 12, if the student is moving into Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Monroe Elementary School student Paul Roa and his classmates sent letters to military personnel in the Persian Gulf this fall amid doubts that anyone would respond. But Maj. Bernadine Donato, an Air Force flight nurse, read Roa's handwritten note, wrote back, and vowed to visit the fourth-grader upon her return. Donato, who said Roa's letter lifted her spirits tremendously, kept her promise and met the fourth-grader face-to-face on Friday, after a six-week tour of duty in Saudi Arabia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before his students were about to take the Stanford 9 standardized test, Principal Howard Haas was exhorting his La Mirada High School teens to hunker down and perform well. They just looked at him. His talk came five days after the Littleton, Colo., shootings last April, and it was easy to see that they were not listening. "I saw my kids were traumatized and frightened--they were scared to come to school and really weren't focusing on this test," he said. And neither was he.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY and DEBRA CANO
The City Council recently honored local students for collecting 10,445 pounds of recycled materials for the city's monument sign project. Hisamatsu Tamura School took first place. Its 430 students collected 1,500 pounds of plastic, or nearly 3.5 pounds per student. Runners-up were James H. Cox School, whose 674 students collected 2,100 pounds, or 3.1 pounds per student; and Robert Gisler School, where 517 students collected 1,415 pounds, or 2.7 pounds per student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1993 | JON NALICK
Students at a school whose name honors a famous American general learned lessons in patriotism this week in the time-honored American way. Standing in respectful silence in a sunny courtyard, 1,200 students at MacArthur Fundamental Intermediate School saw a trooping of the colors by Marines from El Toro, heard martial airs played by the Santa Ana High School band and were exhorted by a Marine major to learn from the experiences of veterans. Maj.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
While the rest of the students in Room 25 at John F. Kennedy Elementary School eagerly tore the wrapping paper off of their donated presents, Veronica Vera, 9, sat quietly at her desk clutching her neatly wrapped gift. The fourth-grader, who lives in the Minnie Street corridor, one of Santa Ana's poorest neighborhoods, said that there were no presents for her at home and that she wanted to have something to unwrap on Christmas morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Araceli Avila knew she would come back. True friends never hold grudges. Two weeks after parent protests led to the closure of the Shalimar Learning Center, the center reopened this week to a stream of eager children from the gritty Costa Mesa neighborhood. The after-school tutoring center, located in converted apartment units on Shalimar Drive, shut down after about 30 parents protested the dismissal of one of its founders, Maria Alvarez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children in some California school districts, including at least three in Orange County, may be exposed to pesticides that have been tied to cancer, according to a report a consumer group issued Wednesday. According to a survey of the state's 15 largest school districts, several have no policies requiring written notification or postings that warn of pesticide use on campus. Among those districts were three in Orange County: Santa Ana Unified, Garden Grove Unified and Capistrano Unified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The elementary school pupils look like typical kids at camp. On a hot summer's day, they busily brighten sombreros with colorful paint and glitter. But wait. Those aren't sombreros. They're Saturn hats. The round middle is the planet and the wide brim the planet's atmosphere. For the last three weeks, 340 students from all over Southern California descended on Anaheim Union High School District's Oxford Academy in Cypress to attend the Boeing Co.'
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October 14, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented recognition of the dangers faced by children walking to school, Gov. Gray Davis signed a bill setting aside $20 million to improve pedestrian safety around California campuses. Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Anaheim), a coauthor of the bill, said Santa Ana's struggles to deal with its high pedestrian death rate played an important role in winning legislative passage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999 | JENNIFER MENA and CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jessie Muro's mother cautions him every morning as the 11-year-old escorts four younger siblings five blocks to Roosevelt Elementary School in Santa Ana: "Be careful." On Wednesday, an army of politicians, teachers and police alarmed by a recent rise in pedestrian accidents echoed the same warning to thousands of children participating in the city's first Walk-a-Child-to-School Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before his students were about to take the Stanford 9 standardized test, Principal Howard Haas was exhorting his La Mirada High School teens to hunker down and perform well. They just looked at him. His talk came five days after the Littleton, Colo., shootings last April, and it was easy to see that they were not listening. "I saw my kids were traumatized and frightened--they were scared to come to school and really weren't focusing on this test," he said. And neither was he.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | BRIAN RAY BALLOU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 150 students gathered at a high school here Saturday to debate current events, tackling Tonya Harding and freedom of expression, illegal immigration and California's "three strikes" legislation. They took a straw poll and decided that state Treasurer Kathleen Brown should be the next governor. And they said executions should not be shown on television and declared that the quality of life is declining across the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | TOM RAGAN
"If I had one wish, it would be to have a drug-free California. I think if we could get rid of all the drugs, we would have less violence. A lot of kids are murdered due to drugs. There would probably be less gangs and drive-by shootings. Also, there would be less people robbing stores to get money to pay off drug dealers." So starts David Miller's winning essay on a drug-free California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before his students were about to take the Stanford 9 standardized test, Principal Howard Haas was exhorting his La Mirada High School teenagers to hunker down and perform well. They just looked at him. His talk came five days after the Littleton, Colo., shootings last April, and it was easy to see that they were not listening. "I saw my kids were traumatized and frightened. They were scared to come to school and really weren't focusing on this test," he said. And neither was he.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were exchange students, nervous teenagers who ventured into foreign territory: ethnically different, economically disparate, two distinct cultures--within 20 miles of each other.
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