Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStudents Orange County
IN THE NEWS

Students Orange County

NEWS
October 14, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented recognition of the dangers faced by children walking to school, Gov. Gray Davis signed a bill setting aside $20 million to improve pedestrian safety around California campuses. Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Anaheim), a coauthor of the bill, said Santa Ana's struggles to deal with its high pedestrian death rate played an important role in winning legislative passage.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999 | JENNIFER MENA and CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jessie Muro's mother cautions him every morning as the 11-year-old escorts four younger siblings five blocks to Roosevelt Elementary School in Santa Ana: "Be careful." On Wednesday, an army of politicians, teachers and police alarmed by a recent rise in pedestrian accidents echoed the same warning to thousands of children participating in the city's first Walk-a-Child-to-School Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before his students were about to take the Stanford 9 standardized test, Principal Howard Haas was exhorting his La Mirada High School teens to hunker down and perform well. They just looked at him. His talk came five days after the Littleton, Colo., shootings last April, and it was easy to see that they were not listening. "I saw my kids were traumatized and frightened--they were scared to come to school and really weren't focusing on this test," he said. And neither was he.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before his students were about to take the Stanford 9 standardized test, Principal Howard Haas was exhorting his La Mirada High School teenagers to hunker down and perform well. They just looked at him. His talk came five days after the Littleton, Colo., shootings last April, and it was easy to see that they were not listening. "I saw my kids were traumatized and frightened. They were scared to come to school and really weren't focusing on this test," he said. And neither was he.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To get a sense of how serious standardized testing has become, parents of high-schoolers in Placentia and Yorba Linda had only to open the mailbox or answer the phone. In advance of this week's Stanford 9 exams in the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District, students who fared well on the test last year received postcards from school officials urging an encore. And those teens whose scores last year fell below the 36th percentile?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and JOHN POPE and VANESSA DeRUYTER
A teacher and four students from Hewes Middle School have been selected as one of the winning teams in the Toshiba/National Science Teachers Assn. ExploraVision Awards program, one of the nation's largest student science competitions. The project of science teacher Christine Karlberg Cantrell and students Emily Feher, Robin Holland, Sabrina Hay and Rachel McIntyre was chosen from nearly 5,000 entries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998 | VANESSA DeRUYTER
As pieces of a puzzle, students must learn about each other to come together. That was the concept behind the fifth annual multicultural celebration at Fairmont Elementary School this week. The event, "Pieces of Fairmont," was the culmination of a three-day project in which parents and students gave presentations about their cultural backgrounds, discussed why they or their ancestors came to America, and shared samples of their countries' native foods.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|