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October 1, 1987 | CLAUDIA LUTHER and BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writers
When most of today's college students were in diapers, or perhaps not even born, a state law was passed that was the child of the '60s protest era. Though widely considered unconstitutional, the 18-year-old law was in effect until a group of Cal State Fullerton students successfully took it upon themselves this year to get it repealed. As a result of their efforts, Gov. George Deukmejian earlier this month signed a bill repealing the law.
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January 29, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Roger Boesche's class on European political thought meets three days a week this semester, and the Occidental College professor says Friday's session was unremarkable. His students apparently were unaware that the day before, their teacher had received the ultimate endorsement: The president of the United States singled out a Boesche class as his favorite college course. The question was one of a handful of questions chosen from hundreds of thousands submitted for a live YouTube interview session with President Obama on Thursday, part of the White House's multifaceted social media campaign following the State of the Union address.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1987 | BRIAN C. WHITTEN, Brian C. Whitten is a UC Irvine student living in Irvine.
After serving as news editor of the student newspaper and as an elected member of the student council, I ran for president of the UC Irvine student body a few weeks ago--and lost. Although I was disappointed, I have great confidence in the president-elect. The bad news, though, is something I learned during my campaign: Most people think all politicians are crooks. That lesson came early. The day I announced my candidacy, a friend asked why I was "lowering myself to politics."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2006 | Duke Helfand and Howard Blume, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and incoming Los Angeles schools Supt. David L. Brewer made their first public appearance Wednesday, downplaying any hint of acrimony and pledging to work together in a new partnership between the city and the school system. "We're going to put kids before politics," Villaraigosa said at a City Hall news conference, adding that he and Brewer would begin meeting weekly. "We're going to put focusing on reform before looking at the past."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
They pick up one another's fallen campaign signs, cheer their opponents' speeches and never go negative. These are not your typical candidates, but rather students running for office at Thurston Middle School in Laguna Beach. There, they copy the format of adult campaigns, culminating in a political convention Monday and elections today, but they leave out the nastier practices that have evolved around the county, state and nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | HELEN KIM
The results of a recent poll displayed a waning interest in politics among college students, who apparently are willing to volunteer their time in promoting public services but do not wish to become involved in government. HELEN KIM spoke with college students about the reasons for their alienation from the political realm. * LARISSA COHEN 18, UCLA I'm involved in a club called UCLA Circle K International. It is the college organization for Key Club.
NEWS
March 19, 1999
It's happening all over high school campuses--student body elections. And when it comes to political campaigning, kids get creative. Take Jim Weir of North Tustin, for instance. Jim, a junior at Foothill High in Santa Ana, plastered his school with posters that carried funny and sometimes nonsensical slogans, such as "Don't worry ladies, there's plenty of Jim Weir to go around" and "Don't be a player hater."
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented move aimed at heading off political activity by the more than 20,000 Chinese students in the United States, China has informed a Chinese graduate student here that he is being fired from his job in Beijing and that his passport is being revoked because of his work for a dissident political organization. The disciplinary action was taken against Hu Ping, 40, who came to the United States last year to study government at Harvard University. On Jan.
NEWS
May 26, 1988
As I near the end of my American year, there are three things most on my mind: school, politics and the prom. Lately, I have been comparing my learning here with my Portuguese education. In many American classes, I have found freedom to exercise my creativity in a way I never had at home. I can see that without certain rules to follow, you can find out more about who you are. Here, in my creative writing class, I began to write poetry, and I haven't stopped since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1995 | GEORGE RAMOS
The college students in Martha Escutia's Political Science 101 class in Huntington Park are an inquisitive bunch. Why, Jose Quirate wants to know, is it illegal to park his car on his front yard? Why, wonders Marcos Ramos, does government procrastinate when battered women need help? Why is it, Danette Gomez complains, that when she asks her friend what political party she belongs to, the friend replies that the only party she's acquainted with is the kind she's invited to on weekends?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A public vocational-education district will hammer out new ethical work rules for students after a cooking class was assigned to cater a Democratic fund-raiser at the home of a district trustee--at no pay. "When I heard about this, I thought, 'Uh-oh, we need to look at this,' " said Karin Freeman, president of the board of trustees for the North Orange County Regional Occupational Program. "We need to make sure we know what is appropriate and allowed under education law."
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Polk braved an unseasonably frosty Florida morning to stand in line Monday, figuring she'd see a bit of national history. Instead, she became a footnote to it. Polk was first in the long queue to get inside Florida's white-domed Supreme Court building, and thus joined only about 100 regular citizens who were given a front-row perch to watch the weighty legal fight that may help decide the presidency.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | WILL ENGLUND, BALTIMORE SUN
A high school student in a tiny village deep in the Russian countryside made the mistake of sending a letter to President Vladimir V. Putin, and now she finds herself stripped of the graduation honors she had been expecting and enrolled in a dairy academy instead of heading for medical school. The letter had nothing to do with politics, and its author, Anya Provorova, certainly meant no disrespect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | HELEN KIM
The results of a recent poll displayed a waning interest in politics among college students, who apparently are willing to volunteer their time in promoting public services but do not wish to become involved in government. HELEN KIM spoke with college students about the reasons for their alienation from the political realm. * LARISSA COHEN 18, UCLA I'm involved in a club called UCLA Circle K International. It is the college organization for Key Club.
NEWS
March 19, 1999
It's happening all over high school campuses--student body elections. And when it comes to political campaigning, kids get creative. Take Jim Weir of North Tustin, for instance. Jim, a junior at Foothill High in Santa Ana, plastered his school with posters that carried funny and sometimes nonsensical slogans, such as "Don't worry ladies, there's plenty of Jim Weir to go around" and "Don't be a player hater."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY
They pick up one another's fallen campaign signs, cheer their opponents' speeches and never go negative. These are not your typical candidates, but rather students running for office at Thurston Middle School in Laguna Beach. There, they copy the format of adult campaigns, culminating in a political convention Monday and elections today, but they leave out the nastier practices that have evolved around the county, state and nation.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
On the pink-splashed walls of the university buildings the slogans survive, scrawled in black: " La Lutte Continue ," " A Bas le Fascisme ." The struggle goes on. Down with fascism. "That's from before," said Mamadou Bocoum from his mildewy dormitory room at one end of a dank hallway. "Before we ended the strike." Bocoum is 26 and his eyes were bright with triumph.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | LESLIE BERESTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Julye Castro used to care little for politics. But that was before Proposition 187. Galvanized to oppose the measure out of fear that several classmates could be kicked out of school, the Belmont High School sophomore turned student leader, helping to organize hundreds of students who marched to City Hall the week before the election. But the feeling of empowerment stirred by the boisterous march faded on election night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1995 | GEORGE RAMOS
The college students in Martha Escutia's Political Science 101 class in Huntington Park are an inquisitive bunch. Why, Jose Quirate wants to know, is it illegal to park his car on his front yard? Why, wonders Marcos Ramos, does government procrastinate when battered women need help? Why is it, Danette Gomez complains, that when she asks her friend what political party she belongs to, the friend replies that the only party she's acquainted with is the kind she's invited to on weekends?
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days following the passage of Proposition 187, school officials around the South Bay tried to reassure students that nothing had really changed. In schools from Lennox and Inglewood to San Pedro, the official message is that, for now, everything will be just as if the measure had not passed. But everything isn't the same, because many of the kids are different. Now they are political.
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