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September 2, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND and LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At Fremont High School in South-Central Los Angeles, 15 beige trailers fresh from the factory have swallowed up the faculty parking lot, forcing teachers to park doubled up in the few remaining spaces. Soon, these newly installed portable classrooms at the edge of campus will house 500 overflow students--nearly 25% of the enrollment. Another 150,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District attend class in similar bungalows scattered across 600 different school sites.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Passing periods at Belmont High School used to mean pushing your way through a hall teeming with students. Now, it is a leisurely stroll. The storied campus perched on top of a hill on the fringe of downtown was once the largest high school in the state and one of the biggest in the country. It was also the most crowded. Built to hold 2,500 at most, it peaked at 5,500 students. But today, it could use a few more. Over the last decade, enrollment has plummeted with the construction of nearby schools by the Los Angeles Unified School District.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Children performing Hanukkah dances are sharing the stage with youngsters singing "White Christmas," as schools around Ventura County strive to celebrate religious holidays without emphasizing any one religion. Aware that a growing number of county students come from families that are Jewish, Islamic or of other non-Christian faiths, schools are taking a more multicultural tack toward marking this time of year. Christmas vacation is now called winter break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The 200 transfer students ate Huli Huli chicken and wore plastic leis at a recent luau held in their honor at USC. But more important than food or party favors, participants said, was the camaraderie and encouragement to join the campus mainstream. Among the organizers was Rebecca Obadia, who transferred from Santa Monica College to USC last year and experienced the stress of starting at a new university midway through a degree program. Obadia, 26, a public relations major, helped revive a transfer student group at USC and is now its president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The swelling of Orange County school enrollments appears to be easing off, with kindergarten enrollment hovering at the same level for three consecutive years and a similar pattern shaping up for the coming academic year. Two of the county's most crowded school districts--Anaheim City and Capistrano Unified--actually expect lower numbers of kindergartners this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2000 | KENNETH MA and REBECCA HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Education has always been a top priority for Patricia Fisher. As the mother of two elementary students in San Juan Accelerated School, Fisher wants her children to achieve what she did in Mexico: a college degree. "If you don't do well in school, you end up working in the kitchen or cleaning people's houses," she said. "There is nothing wrong with that, but I want them to be better."
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | LEE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cerritos College administrators are under pressure from a coalition of students to hire more minority faculty members and to add more ethnic courses to the curriculum. The students said they are concerned that the faculty is predominantly white, while more than two-thirds of the 18,966 students on the Norwalk-based campus are minorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a student population expected to increase by 11,000 in the next school year, officials say the Los Angeles Unified School District's well-received open enrollment program might soon be crowded out of existence. Only 6,000 seats at 120 schools will be available this fall, officials said. That's 1,400 fewer than a year ago and 16,000 fewer than 1994, the first year of the state-mandated program, which was begun when some campuses were sparsely attended or closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
At the Manas grocery store and restaurant on Vermont Avenue near USC, graduate students from Mumbai and New Delhi stop by late at night to pick up a batch of malai kofta, vegetable dumplings, to fuel their engineering study sessions. Or they may sit down for a dinner of tandoori chicken and discuss their latest cricket matches. "If they miss home, they can always come here," said Manas co-owner Kumar Venkata. Increasingly, more USC students do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the fifth straight year, a surging student population coupled with limited classroom space has cut into the Los Angeles Unified School District's well-received open enrollment program, officials said. Only 5,000 seats at 116 schools will be available for open enrollment this fall, 1,000 fewer than a year ago.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
During the warm months, when students at Westport High School got too hot, they cooled down by moving to one of the many vacant classrooms on campus. It was one of the advantages of having 400 students assigned to a school that could hold 1,200. The downside became apparent last week, though, when the Kansas City school board voted to close Westport and 25 other schools -- nearly half of the district's campuses. Big-city districts shutter schools all the time. Cities such as Denver and Portland, Ore., have seen childless young families repopulate their urban cores and have adjusted accordingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
At the Manas grocery store and restaurant on Vermont Avenue near USC, graduate students from Mumbai and New Delhi stop by late at night to pick up a batch of malai kofta, vegetable dumplings, to fuel their engineering study sessions. Or they may sit down for a dinner of tandoori chicken and discuss their latest cricket matches. "If they miss home, they can always come here," said Manas co-owner Kumar Venkata. Increasingly, more USC students do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2003 | Doug Smith, Times Staff Writer
Even as they aim to exceed the national average on standardized tests, California schools have far fewer teachers per 1,000 students than the rest of the country, a study released Tuesday concluded. The state has 74% of the teachers that other states do, considering the size of its student population. "Despite the high expectations for them, California schools have relatively modest resources," the report by the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute found.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The baby boom is back, at least in American schools. The Census Bureau reported Thursday that the number of students enrolled from kindergarten through high school has soared to 49 million, the record population figure first set a generation ago. But things are a lot different this time around. The original boomers, who once vowed to "never trust anyone over 30," have grown up and become parents themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The swelling of Orange County school enrollments appears to be easing off, with kindergarten enrollment hovering at the same level for three consecutive years and a similar pattern shaping up for the coming academic year. Two of the county's most crowded school districts--Anaheim City and Capistrano Unified--actually expect lower numbers of kindergartners this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the fifth straight year, a surging student population coupled with limited classroom space has cut into the Los Angeles Unified School District's well-received open enrollment program, officials said. Only 5,000 seats at 116 schools will be available for open enrollment this fall, 1,000 fewer than a year ago.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The baby boom is back, at least in American schools. The Census Bureau reported Thursday that the number of students enrolled from kindergarten through high school has soared to 49 million, the record population figure first set a generation ago. But things are a lot different this time around. The original boomers, who once vowed to "never trust anyone over 30," have grown up and become parents themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2003 | Doug Smith, Times Staff Writer
Even as they aim to exceed the national average on standardized tests, California schools have far fewer teachers per 1,000 students than the rest of the country, a study released Tuesday concluded. The state has 74% of the teachers that other states do, considering the size of its student population. "Despite the high expectations for them, California schools have relatively modest resources," the report by the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2000 | KENNETH MA and REBECCA HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Education has always been a top priority for Patricia Fisher. As the mother of two elementary students in San Juan Accelerated School, Fisher wants her children to achieve what she did in Mexico: a college degree. "If you don't do well in school, you end up working in the kitchen or cleaning people's houses," she said. "There is nothing wrong with that, but I want them to be better."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | ALEX PADILLA, Alex Padilla is a Los Angeles City Council member representing District 7
Mission College in Sylmar, like most community colleges, is one of the workhorses in our higher education system. The college provides a great opportunity for recent high school graduates to pursue higher education in a convenient, local setting. An associate of arts degree enables many students to transfer to the Cal State or University of California systems. And returning students who enroll at community colleges can learn new skills to be more competitive in our ever-changing economy.
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