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Students Population

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Clyde Smyth, superintendent of the Santa Clarita Valley's lone high school district, the problem is simple and vexing: "How the hell are we going to provide for the kids?" Unable to count on the state for funds to build a much-needed high school, Smyth's district recently asked a developer planning a 491-unit housing tract in Castaic to bear a large part of the cost. Newhall Land and Farming Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | ALEX PADILLA, Alex Padilla is a Los Angeles City Council member representing District 7
Mission College in Sylmar, like most community colleges, is one of the workhorses in our higher education system. The college provides a great opportunity for recent high school graduates to pursue higher education in a convenient, local setting. An associate of arts degree enables many students to transfer to the Cal State or University of California systems. And returning students who enroll at community colleges can learn new skills to be more competitive in our ever-changing economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1995 | LISA M. BOWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Battered by declining enrollment, the Ventura County Community College District stands to lose as much as $1.2 million in state funding over the next three years, trustees learned this week. Officials had believed that enrollment at the district's three campuses was high enough during the 1994-95 school year to satisfy a state requirement that college districts maintain a set number of full-time students in order to receive state money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Hollywood High School could be in danger of losing its nationally acclaimed magnet program for the highly gifted if the campus converts to a multitrack year-round calendar next year to accommodate surging enrollment, officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND and LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At Fremont High School in South-Central Los Angeles, 15 beige trailers fresh from the factory have swallowed up the faculty parking lot, forcing teachers to park doubled up in the few remaining spaces. Soon, these newly installed portable classrooms at the edge of campus will house 500 overflow students--nearly 25% of the enrollment. Another 150,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District attend class in similar bungalows scattered across 600 different school sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Passing periods at Belmont High School used to mean pushing your way through a hall teeming with students. Now, it is a leisurely stroll. The storied campus perched on top of a hill on the fringe of downtown was once the largest high school in the state and one of the biggest in the country. It was also the most crowded. Built to hold 2,500 at most, it peaked at 5,500 students. But today, it could use a few more. Over the last decade, enrollment has plummeted with the construction of nearby schools by the Los Angeles Unified School District.
OPINION
May 17, 1998 | Les Birdsall, Les Birdsall, a curriculum designer, has been a teacher and principal. He co-chaired the Early Childhood Education Committee, in 1971, and directed the California School Improvement Network
The idea of a "golden age" in California education is almost a "given" in discussions about school reform. Most of today's leaders consider themselves products of such a time and would like every child to reap the benefits they enjoy. In last week's debate among the four leading candidates for governor, one of them proudly mentioned that she was educated in California's public schools. But that was then. Today, the state's public-education system, all candidates agreed, is anything but golden.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
During the warm months, when students at Westport High School got too hot, they cooled down by moving to one of the many vacant classrooms on campus. It was one of the advantages of having 400 students assigned to a school that could hold 1,200. The downside became apparent last week, though, when the Kansas City school board voted to close Westport and 25 other schools -- nearly half of the district's campuses. Big-city districts shutter schools all the time. Cities such as Denver and Portland, Ore., have seen childless young families repopulate their urban cores and have adjusted accordingly.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ, AND HOWARD BLUMETIMES STAFF WRITERS
A small Whittier-area school district has quietly put itself on the cutting edge of educational reform by approving a plan to let parents choose which district school their children will attend. The East Whittier City School District on Monday became one of the first county school districts to opt for open enrollment, which education reformers have praised as a strategy to stem the flight of families to private schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The 200 transfer students ate Huli Huli chicken and wore plastic leis at a recent luau held in their honor at USC. But more important than food or party favors, participants said, was the camaraderie and encouragement to join the campus mainstream. Among the organizers was Rebecca Obadia, who transferred from Santa Monica College to USC last year and experienced the stress of starting at a new university midway through a degree program. Obadia, 26, a public relations major, helped revive a transfer student group at USC and is now its president.
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