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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 966-5879
The Orange Unified School District board of trustees unanimously authorized Supt. Barbara Van Otterloo to send a letter to the Orange County Transportation Authority stating it is opposed to any light-rail train system within district boundaries that would put students in danger when traveling to and from school. OCTA is scheduled to decide in December whether to build a multibillion-dollar, 28-mile light-rail system through Orange County that would connect Fullerton and Irvine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Hoover High School junior Christopher Chung learned while scrolling through Facebook that his school was monitoring students' online activities. Christopher saw an article posted by a friend about the Glendale Unified School District hiring a company to screen students' social media posts. The school district had been doing so for about a year. "I heard rumors that GUSD was doing a little bit of monitoring - but nothing as official as this," he said. "The only way students were finding out about it was through social media.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE
In the first official reaction to the fatal stabbing of a popular Ventura High School student, city officials Monday decided to close a section of Poli Street to prevent drive-by shootings at the campus. No incidents of that type have ever occurred at the campus, but city and school officials say the move is a necessary precaution.
OPINION
February 9, 2012
Memories of molestations by Roman Catholic priests are fresh in the public's mind, along with the cover-ups of those crimes by church leaders. Less remembered is the McMartin Pre-School case of the late 1980s. The accusations of sexual abuse and satanic rituals at that family-run preschool in Manhattan Beach panicked a generation of parents. But the case eventually fell apart because some of the allegations were proved untrue, and no one was ever convicted. Which one of these more closely resembles the situation at Miramonte Elementary School, where the entire staff will be replaced on Thursday?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | JON NALICK
Walton Intermediate School will host a safety forum for parents and students on Thursday. During the meeting, which starts at 7 p.m., police and school officials will discuss strategies for keeping children safe, provide security tips and answer questions from the audience, said Alan Trudell, spokesman for the Garden Grove Unified School District. The forum is sponsored by Walton Intermediate PTA, and free child care will be provided.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Hoover High School junior Christopher Chung learned while scrolling through Facebook that his school was monitoring students' online activities. Christopher saw an article posted by a friend about the Glendale Unified School District hiring a company to screen students' social media posts. The school district had been doing so for about a year. "I heard rumors that GUSD was doing a little bit of monitoring - but nothing as official as this," he said. "The only way students were finding out about it was through social media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1988
All too often, a situation must get extremely tragic before public outcry and/or the proper officials finally do something to remedy the problem. Many times it is barely enough, or the program is a few steps away from really doing the job. Not so the case with traffic on Street of the Golden Lantern and other nearby busy thoroughfares, where hundreds of school-children attempt to get to and from school safely each day, in Laguna Nigel. Each morning and afternoon, Calfornia Highway Patrol and Orange County officers patrol the intersection, both to control intersection cross traffic and to slow down the usual 60- to 70-m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
With summer vacation from school approaching, students at Winnetka Avenue Elementary School got a lesson Tuesday in dealing with seasonal hazards. But instead of their teacher giving a lecture, a doctor-in-training delivered some good advice. "If someone is stung by a bee, people sometimes try to get the stinger out with tweezers, but this will only make things worse," Dr. Sam Tseng told an attentive group of third-graders in Becky Woo's class. "Tweezers will inject the poison into the skin.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paramount High will soon join a growing list of area schools to station an armed law enforcement officer on campus. School district officials voted this week to hire a sheriff's deputy for the high school in the wake of three recent shootings near the campus that left two students dead and injured another last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blythe Street children who normally make a dangerous daily trek through gang turf and across train tracks to attend class will be offered bus services thanks to an agreement announced Thursday between Los Angeles city and school officials. The bus service was provided at the repeated request of parents in the working-class neighborhood, some of whom have paid up to $28 a week to have private vans drive students to school. Beginning Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2008 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
A survey of 6,008 South Los Angeles high school students shows that many are frightened by violence in school, deeply dissatisfied with their choices of college preparatory classes, and -- perhaps most striking -- exhibit symptoms of clinical depression. "A lot of students are depressed because of the conditions in their school," said Anna Exiga, a junior at Jordan High School who was one of the organizers of the survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2006 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Despite an ongoing feud between city and school district leaders, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and new Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. David L. Brewer pledged jointly Wednesday to demand more funding for schools and more accountability from the district. They also announced a common agenda of adding Saturday classes and lengthening the school day. Cooperation already is underway, they added, on improving the safe passage of children who walk to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2005 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
Ana Alfaro had lost hope in the Los Angeles public school system. Her daughter was failing her middle school classes and didn't feel safe on her overcrowded campus. Alfaro was ready to send her to relatives in Mexico to attend school. But last summer, Alfaro received a flier advertising a new 200-student charter school in her South Los Angeles neighborhood. It did not offer a gym, an athletic program or extracurricular clubs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A white van pulled up to the corner in an illegal space in front of Kester Avenue School in Van Nuys at 7:40 on a recent morning, and a child jumped out. "Passenger exiting vehicle," traffic enforcement Officer Tony Yancey said as he trained his video camera on the scene unfolding 100 yards up the block. "No stop, tow-away." Yancey zoomed in on the license plate number. Within two weeks, the driver will receive a $60 ticket in the mail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
With summer vacation from school approaching, students at Winnetka Avenue Elementary School got a lesson Tuesday in dealing with seasonal hazards. But instead of their teacher giving a lecture, a doctor-in-training delivered some good advice. "If someone is stung by a bee, people sometimes try to get the stinger out with tweezers, but this will only make things worse," Dr. Sam Tseng told an attentive group of third-graders in Becky Woo's class. "Tweezers will inject the poison into the skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 966-5879
The Orange Unified School District board of trustees unanimously authorized Supt. Barbara Van Otterloo to send a letter to the Orange County Transportation Authority stating it is opposed to any light-rail train system within district boundaries that would put students in danger when traveling to and from school. OCTA is scheduled to decide in December whether to build a multibillion-dollar, 28-mile light-rail system through Orange County that would connect Fullerton and Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1993
Debbie Sandland, Board member, Simi Valley Unified School District It's a very difficult line and I'm very concerned about that. I would like to provide the maximum amount of security that we can and that would mean metal detectors and spot-checks. I am very concerned about the rights of students and personal freedoms, and I don't want to step on those rights, but I think safety is the ultimate objective. I would like to see metal detectors on school campuses and spot-checks done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A white van pulled up to the corner in an illegal space in front of Kester Avenue School in Van Nuys at 7:40 on a recent morning, and a child jumped out. "Passenger exiting vehicle," traffic enforcement Officer Tony Yancey said as he trained his video camera on the scene unfolding 100 yards up the block. "No stop, tow-away." Yancey zoomed in on the license plate number. Within two weeks, the driver will receive a $60 ticket in the mail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District officials scrapped a proposal Thursday to reduce pesticide spraying on campuses after parents and environmentalists said the plan would fail to halt the use of dangerous chemicals. The district's pest control managers will now select a committee of about 10 people to draft a new policy. That group is expected to include district staff, parents, environmental regulators and others.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton tried Friday to revive interest in his besieged education agenda, citing new studies indicating that smaller classrooms not only make students smarter but safer. Clinton released government reports addressing the effects of classroom size and the proliferation of guns at school and suggested that fewer children might pack pistols if their teachers got to know them better. "Children in some classes in America are in classes that are so big . . .
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