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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998 | Ruben Carriedo, Carriedo is assistant superintendent for planning assessment and accountability for the San Diego Unified School District
The impending release of test scores from the statewide assessment program (STAR) includes results for California students in grades two through 11 on the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (SAT 9), in language arts, mathematics, science and history/social studies. These data will provide valuable information about student learning for nearly 100,000 students in San Diego city schools and 4 million across California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998 | Ruben Carriedo, Carriedo is assistant superintendent for planning assessment and accountability for the San Diego Unified School District
The impending release of test scores from the statewide assessment program (STAR) includes results for California students in grades two through 11 on the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (SAT 9), in language arts, mathematics, science and history/social studies. These data will provide valuable information about student learning for nearly 100,000 students in San Diego city schools and 4 million across California.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 12-year-old Russ Grisbeck, it seemed like a good way to learn the laws of physics, just the kind of thing a science project is supposed to do. Under his father's supervision, Russ used a Remington hunting rifle to fire bullets with different amounts of gunpowder into targets and measure the comparative velocity and accuracy.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 12-year-old Russ Grisbeck, it seemed like a good way to learn the laws of physics, just the kind of thing a science project is supposed to do. Under his father's supervision, Russ used a Remington hunting rifle to fire bullets with different amounts of gunpowder into targets and measure the comparative velocity and accuracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1987 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
After the 80 public school teachers shed their inhibitions, there was no stopping their ability to absorb the dance, music and visual arts seminar materials given them last week. So a visitor to one cavernous room at the Balboa Park Recital Hall saw a group of teachers paired off, each performing a complex pantomime for his or her partner, who then took colored construction paper and chairs to create a three-dimensional representation of the movements.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat Gage stood at the front of her honor's English class at Granite Hills High School with a bemused, somewhat confused expression. "Outside are two people named Alex and Andrea," she told her students, "and I don't know what they're going to do." Gage knew that the two Old Globe Theatre representatives were going to talk to her class about Moliere as part of the Globe's student outreach program Playguides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For every six students enrolled at a San Diego city school at the beginning of the school year two years ago, five ended the year in the same classroom--a rate higher than expected, according to a new study by the nation's eighth-largest urban district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1991 | Mark Edward Ryan is a mentor teacher at Lincoln Preparatory High School in San Diego. He teaches civics and history. and
Two-thirds of the immigrants on this planet come to the United States. One-third of these immigrants are destined for California. According to the most recent data from the San Diego City Schools, the number of limited-English-proficient students has increased 129% in the last 10 years. In fact, there are more than 60 different languages and dialects spoken by students in our city schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For students at University of San Diego High School, a Dentyne or Gatorade commercial has been a small price to pay to learn such things as the difference between Margaret Thatcher and Dianne Feinstein, or that Guam is an American possession in the Pacific, not the name of a chip dip.
SPORTS
July 7, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
There were no runs, no hits and plenty of errors. But this was great baseball, the kind that players from Abner Doubleday to Zane Smith would have loved. Nine-year-old Brent Delhamer of Coronado said he had a fantastic time, and he made just as many blunders as everyone else. "I must have had fun," Brent said, "because it only seemed like 30 minutes to me, and it was three hours." This was baseball the way it was meant to be learned.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat Gage stood at the front of her honor's English class at Granite Hills High School with a bemused, somewhat confused expression. "Outside are two people named Alex and Andrea," she told her students, "and I don't know what they're going to do." Gage knew that the two Old Globe Theatre representatives were going to talk to her class about Moliere as part of the Globe's student outreach program Playguides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1991 | Mark Edward Ryan is a mentor teacher at Lincoln Preparatory High School in San Diego. He teaches civics and history. and
Two-thirds of the immigrants on this planet come to the United States. One-third of these immigrants are destined for California. According to the most recent data from the San Diego City Schools, the number of limited-English-proficient students has increased 129% in the last 10 years. In fact, there are more than 60 different languages and dialects spoken by students in our city schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For students at University of San Diego High School, a Dentyne or Gatorade commercial has been a small price to pay to learn such things as the difference between Margaret Thatcher and Dianne Feinstein, or that Guam is an American possession in the Pacific, not the name of a chip dip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For every six students enrolled at a San Diego city school at the beginning of the school year two years ago, five ended the year in the same classroom--a rate higher than expected, according to a new study by the nation's eighth-largest urban district.
SPORTS
July 7, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
There were no runs, no hits and plenty of errors. But this was great baseball, the kind that players from Abner Doubleday to Zane Smith would have loved. Nine-year-old Brent Delhamer of Coronado said he had a fantastic time, and he made just as many blunders as everyone else. "I must have had fun," Brent said, "because it only seemed like 30 minutes to me, and it was three hours." This was baseball the way it was meant to be learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1987 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
After the 80 public school teachers shed their inhibitions, there was no stopping their ability to absorb the dance, music and visual arts seminar materials given them last week. So a visitor to one cavernous room at the Balboa Park Recital Hall saw a group of teachers paired off, each performing a complex pantomime for his or her partner, who then took colored construction paper and chairs to create a three-dimensional representation of the movements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The undercover officers started to appear at San Diego State fraternity parties about six months ago. They dressed like students, complained about their parents and professors, and talked freely and knowingly of things of great interest on campus: music, sex and drugs. Soon they were accepted, with no questions asked. They were spotted at student hangouts on and off campus. They swapped cellphone numbers with other partygoers. They text-messaged their newfound friends.
NEWS
November 7, 1991
Enrollment in the Long Beach Unified School District is inching toward an all-time record. The official enrollment at the end of the first month of school stood at 74,012. That is the largest number of students since 1963, when the district set its record of 74,564 students. District officials expect student population to continue to rise as more students enroll. Thus far, the growth in attendance over last year is 2,558 students, the second largest increase ever.
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