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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2000 | SHARON NAGY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventh-grader Andrew Gazdecki isn't looking to use his skateboard to grind sidewalks. The 12-year-old wants to use his board to get to school, and he swears he'll wear a helmet. Officials of Shorecliffs Middle School have told him no. The rule is, skateboards are not allowed on campus. So Andrew began gathering signatures earlier this month in support of his request. He plans to deliver 148 names to his school principal today, along with a speech on self-sufficient transportation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2000 | SHARON NAGY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventh-grader Andrew Gazdecki isn't looking to use his skateboard to grind sidewalks. The 12-year-old wants to use his board to get to school, and he swears he'll wear a helmet. Officials of Shorecliffs Middle School have told him no. The rule is, skateboards are not allowed on campus. So Andrew began gathering signatures earlier this month in support of his request. He plans to deliver 148 names to his school principal today, along with a speech on self-sufficient transportation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 15
Most parents aren't thrilled with the Huntington Beach City School District's proposal to charge students for riding the bus, but those who attended an informational meeting Tuesday now know why the district can't make ends meet. "I came into this thinking, 'I don't want to pay something,' but the issues they are dealing with are legitimate," said Agnes L. Smith Elementary School parent Patty Evans, one of about 30 residents who attended the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If MTA bus drivers go on strike Friday, more than 16,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District will have to find their own transportation to school. Students will be hitching rides with friends or parents. They will be riding bikes. Or walking. Or simply playing hooky. "We don't have to come to school," Mario Molina, a ninth-grader at Belmont High School near downtown, said as he piled into an MTA bus with dozens of students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If MTA bus drivers go on strike Friday, more than 16,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District will have to find their own transportation to school. Students will be hitching rides with friends or parents. They will be riding bikes. Or walking. Or simply playing hooky. "We don't have to come to school," Mario Molina, a ninth-grader at Belmont High School near downtown, said as he piled into an MTA bus with dozens of students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JEFF KASS
New traffic signs and maps indicating the safest routes to 20 elementary schools will be considered by the City Council on Monday as part of a state program to improve campus safety. A $150,000 grant from Caltrans will allow Santa Ana to survey school routes and ensure that traffic signs and an additional 14 crosswalks comply with state and federal and standards. City Engineer George Alvarez said a survey is needed every five years because traffic laws and street conditions constantly change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The large-scale expansion of the Los Angeles Unified School District's magnet school program will require some parents to take their children to bus stops farther from their homes as officials reduce bus service to help pay for additional magnet campuses. In the wake of a Board of Education decision late Monday to open 24 magnets--10 of them in the San Fernando Valley--district officials said they will have to overhaul the massive transportation program for the 37,000 magnet students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after more than 100 jobs were eliminated, 7% across-the-board pay cuts were ordered and numerous programs were slashed, the worst may not be over for the financially troubled Antelope Valley Union High School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
In an effort to save money, Brea-Olinda Unified School District trustees decided this week to eliminate school bus service for high school students and charge junior high school students $50 a year for transportation. By unanimous vote Monday night, trustees adopted the policy following a public hearing. Bus service for elementary school children will not be affected. Officials said they hope to save the district about $25,000 the first year; the policy will go into effect in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1993 | AARON CURTISS
Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday contributed nearly $20,000 to help continue a program that buses students to nature centers in the Santa Monica and Santa Susana mountains. The 5-year-old program provides free transportation for students to areas in the hills around the San Fernando Valley, coordinator Rob Remedi said. He coordinates about 400 trips a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | STEVE EMMONS
The photo at top right, circa 1908, shows one of Orange County's great innovations in education--free rides to Fullerton Union High School. It was the first time in California that a school district provided free transportation for students, according to Orange County historian Doris Walker. Previously there had been no need. Few children continued their education past the eighth grade, and the local school was within walking distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 15
Most parents aren't thrilled with the Huntington Beach City School District's proposal to charge students for riding the bus, but those who attended an informational meeting Tuesday now know why the district can't make ends meet. "I came into this thinking, 'I don't want to pay something,' but the issues they are dealing with are legitimate," said Agnes L. Smith Elementary School parent Patty Evans, one of about 30 residents who attended the meeting.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
School districts might save money using vans instead of school buses to transport students, but it's "an economical advantage purchased at the safety of children," National Transportation Safety Board Chairman James E. Hall. Wrapping up a special investigation into four crashes involving "nonconforming buses," Hall said the standard yellow bus provides better crash protection than vans and should be the only type of vehicle used to take students to school and school-related activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
Easing concerns of parents, Anaheim Union High School District trustees recently agreed to provide fee-based busing for students attending Oxford Academy, the district's first college-preparatory campus. Parents raised concerns about transportation difficulties to and from the Cypress campus. Seventh- and eighth-grade students from throughout the district attend the academy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JEFF KASS
New traffic signs and maps indicating the safest routes to 20 elementary schools will be considered by the City Council on Monday as part of a state program to improve campus safety. A $150,000 grant from Caltrans will allow Santa Ana to survey school routes and ensure that traffic signs and an additional 14 crosswalks comply with state and federal and standards. City Engineer George Alvarez said a survey is needed every five years because traffic laws and street conditions constantly change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | JENNIFER LEUER
A string of retired bus drivers and a lack of buses for sale have compounded Placentia-Yorba Linda School District's transportation problems, an assistant superintendent reported this week. At the district trustees' Tuesday night meeting, Assistant Supt. Kim Stallings said there are no buses immediately available for purchase or lease. "We've even checked on the Internet for buses," said Stallings, who added that two buses might be available within a couple of weeks.
NEWS
August 26, 1990
Why hasn't anyone in politics (in California), the media or the public asked Gov. Deukmejian to postpone the 5-cent tax on gasoline until the emergency in the Persian Gulf is over. We don't mind paying the tax after the price on gasoline comes back to the level before this Mideast confrontations, but it is too much to ask us to pay the 5-cent tax, too. RICHRD METH Desert Hot Springs
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | MALAIKA BROWN
Special education student Jacob Wagtal said it would be a million years before he would fasten his seat belt on the school bus. In years past, that remark would have earned him a citation for bad behavior. But bus aide Wilma LeMon has discovered another way to get students to buckle up, be seated, sit still, pipe down or otherwise keep them under control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cost-cutting move, the Los Angeles city school district has stopped providing bus service for thousands of students who live two miles or less from their magnet school campus--angering parents who only learned of the change when fall classes started. Los Angeles Unified School District board members and officials have received a flood of protest letters and telephone calls in the past three weeks.
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