Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStudents United States
IN THE NEWS

Students United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
The head of the National Education Assn. on Thursday called for a $2.2-billion program that would offer an intensive session to prepare elementary students in need of extra attention. Keith Geiger proposed Operation Jump Start during the opening session of the NEA's annual meeting, explaining that the program would be an "all-out, full-alert effort to give every elementary child who needs it an educational booster shot."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | TOM SCHULTZ and RICHARD COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In findings decried by President Clinton and a host of educators, America's 12th-graders ranked in the lower third among 21 nations in tests measuring their knowledge of math and science, according to data released Tuesday. The tests, given in the 1994-95 school year, also found that even this country's top high school seniors--those taking advanced math and science courses--were outperformed by similar students in most other countries.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
A survey of almost 400,000 junior high and high school students nationwide found that the percentage using drugs has dropped in the past two years, but those who use cocaine are getting higher. "I'm discouraged that the levels of intoxication are increasing," Thomas J. Gleaton Jr., president of National Parents' Resource Institute for Drug Education, said Tuesday in announcing survey results.
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American students are reading more proficiently than their counterparts in other countries but reports of this success might draw attention away from problems that continue to pervade the nation's classrooms, according to a report released Monday by the Department of Education. "The United States is second in the world behind Finland . . . when it comes to literacy," said Education Secretary Richard W. Riley. For years, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Cedar Falls, Iowa, children did chores to raise money. In Tarborog, N.C., students collected 70,000 pennies. And in Erie, Pa., students are collecting 6,600 new books. These efforts reflect an outpouring of support from students at more than 200 schools nationwide. The youths, moved by searing scenes of destruction from the massive Northridge earthquake, have mounted fund-raising dances, book drives, pen pal writing campaigns and other efforts to aid their Los Angeles-area counterparts.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dwindling stockpiles of surplus food are creating severe shortages in school food programs throughout the country, causing school districts to raise prices and students to drop out of lunch programs in large numbers, educators and government officials say. While schools are being pressured to improve student nutrition, many are losing large chunks of their cafeteria budgets because federal surpluses of cheese, powdered milk, beef and other commodities have dried up.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The performance of most American elementary and high school students is "low and not improving," and most of them demonstrate an inability to think through problems on their own, according to a Department of Education "report card" issued Wednesday. Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos called the analysis of achievement in the fourth, eighth and 12th grades "a compendium of disappointment." He said that, to meet the "daunting challenge," parents must give more assistance to teachers.
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American students are reading more proficiently than their counterparts in other countries but reports of this success might draw attention away from problems that continue to pervade the nation's classrooms, according to a report released Monday by the Department of Education. "The United States is second in the world behind Finland . . . when it comes to literacy," said Education Secretary Richard W. Riley. For years, U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | TOM SCHULTZ and RICHARD COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In findings decried by President Clinton and a host of educators, America's 12th-graders ranked in the lower third among 21 nations in tests measuring their knowledge of math and science, according to data released Tuesday. The tests, given in the 1994-95 school year, also found that even this country's top high school seniors--those taking advanced math and science courses--were outperformed by similar students in most other countries.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | JIM GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
"The rules have changed," President Bush told the nation's schoolchildren in a televised address Tuesday. "If you do drugs, you will be caught. And when you're caught, you will be punished.' Former First Lady Nancy Reagan's benign "Just Say No" approach to the drug problem was gone Tuesday, although the President did say that "saying 'no' won't make you a nerd. It won't make you a loser."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Cedar Falls, Iowa, children did chores to raise money. In Tarborog, N.C., students collected 70,000 pennies. And in Erie, Pa., students are collecting 6,600 new books. These efforts reflect an outpouring of support from students at more than 200 schools nationwide. The youths, moved by searing scenes of destruction from the massive Northridge earthquake, have mounted fund-raising dances, book drives, pen pal writing campaigns and other efforts to aid their Los Angeles-area counterparts.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A national board Friday determined for the first time the kind of mathematics problems that students in grades 4, 8 and 12 should be able to solve on congressionally mandated tests. Members of the National Assessment Governing Board said they hope that the new method of reporting scores will arouse a public that has grown complacent about the quality of schooling in the United States.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The performance of most American elementary and high school students is "low and not improving," and most of them demonstrate an inability to think through problems on their own, according to a Department of Education "report card" issued Wednesday. Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos called the analysis of achievement in the fourth, eighth and 12th grades "a compendium of disappointment." He said that, to meet the "daunting challenge," parents must give more assistance to teachers.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
The head of the National Education Assn. on Thursday called for a $2.2-billion program that would offer an intensive session to prepare elementary students in need of extra attention. Keith Geiger proposed Operation Jump Start during the opening session of the NEA's annual meeting, explaining that the program would be an "all-out, full-alert effort to give every elementary child who needs it an educational booster shot."
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like an obvious educational reform less than a decade ago: If you want to make sure that kids all over the country are learning the basics, test them and test them often. But now a growing number of politicians and educators are not so sure. The reaction against standardized testing has set in. In early May, for example, James J. Florio, the new Democratic governor of New Jersey, decided to end the practice of forcing public school students to take statewide proficiency tests.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | Associated Press
The U.S. government has been investigating allegations that Chinese officials have been harassing Chinese students in the United States who are critical of the Beijing government, the State Department said Friday. The department's statement followed allegations by a defector from the Chinese Embassy who reported that embassy officers were ordered to intimidate critics. The comments of the defector, Xu Lin, appeared in Friday's editions of The Times.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like an obvious educational reform less than a decade ago: If you want to make sure that kids all over the country are learning the basics, test them and test them often. But now a growing number of politicians and educators are not so sure. The reaction against standardized testing has set in. In early May, for example, James J. Florio, the new Democratic governor of New Jersey, decided to end the practice of forcing public school students to take statewide proficiency tests.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A national board Friday determined for the first time the kind of mathematics problems that students in grades 4, 8 and 12 should be able to solve on congressionally mandated tests. Members of the National Assessment Governing Board said they hope that the new method of reporting scores will arouse a public that has grown complacent about the quality of schooling in the United States.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A secret document ferreted out from the Chinese Embassy in Washington by a defecting diplomat last week discloses that China is attempting to isolate and discredit Chinese student leaders and pro-democracy organizations in the United States.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young Chinese diplomat said Friday that he is defecting to the West and, at an extraordinary press conference sponsored by a student group, claimed that most of his colleagues at the Chinese embassy in Washington quietly support the pro-democracy movement. The diplomat, Xu Lin, 32, had worked in the education section of the embassy and had been assigned to work with Chinese student organizations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|