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NEWS
January 6, 1995 | Special to The Times
Federal civil rights investigators have launched an inquiry into whether all-girl math classes at two Ventura schools discriminate against boys, a move that may bode ill for the future of a program that has won nationwide attention. Ventura school officials said they learned Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights received a complaint alleging that female-only math classes at Ventura High School and Anacapa Middle School are discriminatory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
Police have arrested a UC Irvine student on suspicion of assaulting two people, battering two others, exposing himself and brandishing a fake gun in a campus residence hall. Andrei Tatuiko, 18, has denied the allegations, pleading not guilty before an Orange County Superior Court judge on Oct. 11. The defendant posted a $50,000 bond and was released from jail early Saturday. UCI police declined to release details about the incidents, saying they are part of an ongoing investigation, but charges filed by the Orange County district attorney show that the alleged crimes took place over the span of a week in early October.
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NEWS
September 10, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
A month after admitting women in a freshman class for the first time, Virginia Military Academy on Tuesday suspended a female cadet for two semesters for striking a male upperclassman. The Lexington, Va., military college said the woman lost her temper while being disciplined by an older student. Angelica Garza was suspended for two semesters for hitting and pushing the school's sergeant of the guard on Aug.
WORLD
August 15, 2009 | Laura King
One is the face of despair; the other, of hope. Zeinab, 22, believed only death could provide an escape from her husband's merciless beatings. So she set herself on fire, leaving one-third of her body covered with oozing, blistering burns. She faces a lifetime of disfigurement and the likely loss of her two children unless she returns to her abusive marriage. Twelve-year-old Nazira's classroom is a sweltering tent, and her desk is a plastic mat on the ground. But her teachers say she is one of their brightest pupils, encouraged by a mother and father who want her to get as much education as she can. Her eyes sparkle when she describes her ambition: to become a doctor.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Schoolgirls in Cairo and elsewhere suffered mysterious fainting spells, and hundreds were hospitalized. Teachers closed schools and politicians debated while doctors attributed the spells to teen-age hysteria. More than 1,000 girls between 12 and 18 years old have suffered nausea and fainting spells since the first cases were reported last week. No serious aftereffects have been reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | SUE McALLISTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could be a perfect fit: Well-regarded girls school buys beautiful retirement home as its new campus and vows to preserve the historic building and fields in a busy corner of Brentwood zoned for more condos. The elderly residents of the Eastern Star Home leave their cherished Spanish Colonial Revival building in appreciative hands to move to a more modern facility. But many of the neighbors are building an arsenal to fight the school's efforts to obtain the permit necessary to open next fall.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
From the way courses are designed to the methods teachers use to bestow attention on students, America's public schools are badly shortchanging girls, furthering inequities that hinder the choices they make as adults, the American Assn. of University Women contends in a landmark report to be released today. The report pulls together two decades of research to provide the most comprehensive look to date at the bias girls face from preschool through high school.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court on Tuesday blocked a woman from enrolling at The Citadel until it can hear more about whether women should be allowed into the state-supported military college. "I'm shocked," said Suzanne Coe, the attorney for Shannon Faulkner, the 18-year-old who had planned to register Thursday for classes at the all-male college. Coe said attorneys would either appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court or ask for a speedy trial.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
House conservatives sought support Wednesday for a plan to give poor students $3,500 private school vouchers. Democrats battled to save a program aimed at ensuring equality for girls in America's classrooms. The developments came as the House debated the renewal of an $8.3-billion federal education bill that governs programs for nearly 11 million of the nation's impoverished and failing students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Thirty years ago, Gayle Wilson was a trailblazer, majoring in biology at Stanford University at a time when women were not encouraged to study science. And Thursday, dismayed by recent studies that contend women are more likely to drop out of science and medicine programs than men, Wilson, who is married to Gov. Pete Wilson, visited the the Van Nuys High School Medical Magnet to give a pep talk to female students.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
House conservatives sought support Wednesday for a plan to give poor students $3,500 private school vouchers. Democrats battled to save a program aimed at ensuring equality for girls in America's classrooms. The developments came as the House debated the renewal of an $8.3-billion federal education bill that governs programs for nearly 11 million of the nation's impoverished and failing students.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Citadel graduated its first female cadet Saturday, ending a male-only tradition at the military school that stretched more than 150 years before ending as a result of a federal court fight. Nancy Ruth Mace, a magna cum laude graduate in business administration, received her degree from her father, Emory Mace, the school's commandant of cadets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1998 | SUE McALLISTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could be a perfect fit: Well-regarded girls school buys beautiful retirement home as its new campus and vows to preserve the historic building and fields in a busy corner of Brentwood zoned for more condos. The elderly residents of the Eastern Star Home leave their cherished Spanish Colonial Revival building in appreciative hands to move to a more modern facility. But many of the neighbors are building an arsenal to fight the school's efforts to obtain the permit necessary to open next fall.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
A month after admitting women in a freshman class for the first time, Virginia Military Academy on Tuesday suspended a female cadet for two semesters for striking a male upperclassman. The Lexington, Va., military college said the woman lost her temper while being disciplined by an older student. Angelica Garza was suspended for two semesters for hitting and pushing the school's sergeant of the guard on Aug.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | Special to The Times
Federal civil rights investigators have launched an inquiry into whether all-girl math classes at two Ventura schools discriminate against boys, a move that may bode ill for the future of a program that has won nationwide attention. Ventura school officials said they learned Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights received a complaint alleging that female-only math classes at Ventura High School and Anacapa Middle School are discriminatory.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Wednesday turned down Shannon Faulkner's second request to be spared the shaved-head haircut that all cadets receive when they enter The Citadel. U.S. District Judge C. Weston Houck, who ruled earlier that the military school's all-male admissions policy was unconstitutional, had said Faulkner would have to get the "buzz cut." Her attorneys and the U.S. Justice Department asked him to reconsider, arguing that she should be given a short bob like women in the military receive.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
From the way courses are designed to the methods teachers use to bestow attention on students, America's public schools are badly shortchanging girls, furthering inequities that hinder the choices they make as adults, the American Assn. of University Women contends in a landmark report to be released today. The report pulls together two decades of research to provide the most comprehensive look to date at the bias girls face from preschool through high school.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Citadel graduated its first female cadet Saturday, ending a male-only tradition at the military school that stretched more than 150 years before ending as a result of a federal court fight. Nancy Ruth Mace, a magna cum laude graduate in business administration, received her degree from her father, Emory Mace, the school's commandant of cadets.
REAL ESTATE
October 17, 1993
Stacie Wong, a UC Berkeley student from Monterey Park, has been named First Prize winner of the Assn. for Women in Architecture 1993 scholarships competition. Socorro Flores, at Woodbury University, placed second, and Nina Seelos, at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, was third. Receiving honorable mention awards were Karin Liljegren, Sandra Zaida and Cindy Johnson. Applications for the 1994 scholarships will be available from the organization in February.
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