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SCIENCE
April 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have replicated one of the most significant accomplishments in stem cell research by creating human embryos that were clones of two men. The lab-engineered embryos were harvested within days and used to create lines of infinitely reproducing embryonic stem cells, which are capable of growing into any type of human tissue. The work, reported Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell, comes 11 months after researchers in Oregon said they had produced the world's first human embryo clones and used them to make stem cells.
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SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Free samples of prescription drugs may seem like a great deal for patients. But even when doctors think they're doing patients a favor by handing out the freebies, the real beneficiaries are the drug manufacturers, according to new research in the journal JAMA Dermatology. Medical groups have grown increasingly wary about free drug samples, and they've already been banned by Kaiser Permanente, many academic medical centers, the Veterans Health Administration, the U.S. military and plenty of private medical clinics.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Maybe Jerry Brown was more right about marijuana than folks gave him credit for -- at least if a new study on pot has merit. You may recall that California's governor, appearing on NBC's “Meet the Press” in March, had this to say about marijuana legalization : “How many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation? The world's pretty dangerous, very competitive. I think we need to stay alert, if not 24 hours a day, more than some of the potheads might be able to put together.” Plenty of folks disagree with that view, of course (hey, the '60s die hard!
SCIENCE
April 15, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
As a woman's body mass index rises before she is pregnant or early in pregnancy, there is an increased risk of fetal death, stillbirth or infant death, and severely obese women have the highest risk, researchers said Tuesday. But even “modest” increases in BMI were associated with increased risks, the scientists wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The scientists recommend that women and their caregivers take the findings into account as they consider getting pregnant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Ozomatli is taking its polyglot music and attitude from the streets into the halls of academia. In preparation for Ozomatli Day on April 23 in Los Angeles, the long-running East L.A. rock-R&B-punk-funk ensemble will visit UCLA's Chicano Studies Research Center at noon Monday for a question-and-answer session and an acoustic performance. Unlike many such sessions where attendees are advised against documenting them with smartphones or tablets, Ozomatli is encouraging the audience to shoot the session, then personalize it and share it on the group's web site.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Looking for a jet-lag cure? A new mathematical model may help you overcome jet lag faster than anyone thought possible. And scientists need your help to test it out.  A research team from the University of Michigan and Yale University has released a free iPhone app that loads a complex, jet-lag conquering model right into your smartphone. You type in your current location and destination as well as what kind of light you will have access to, and the app gives you a schedule of light exposure that should reset your internal clock in the most efficient way. "These are the fastest schedules that have ever been proposed," said Olivia Walch, a PhD student at the University of Michigan who designed the app, called Entrain . "Our schedule takes what could be 12 days of adjusting down to four.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Fruit flies could make some talented fighter pilots. Scientists who had the insects wing it through two laser beams watched the bugs make hairpin turns at blazing fast speeds, by banking in the same way that fighter jet planes do. The findings, published in the journal Science, shed light on these tiny critters' remarkable ability to evade predators (and fly swatters). [Updated at 5:15 p.m. PDT April 10: Tracking how these insects fly in response to a threat should help researchers understand the fruit fly's inner life, said Cornell University physicist Jane Wang, who was not involved in the research.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Two psychologically damaged siblings doing battle with a mysterious home furnishing makes for nervy moviegoing in the housebound chiller "Oculus. " The object in question is the Lasser Glass, an ornate, antique black cedar mirror of historically malevolent intentions, or so believes Kaylie (Karen Gillan), whose parents met a bloody, psychotic end a decade ago. Her younger, more emotionally fragile brother Tim (Brenton Thwaites), fresh from a mental facility, is less sure of sis' theory and more intent on moving on from the tragedy.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
In their continuing quest to prove that coffee is indeed a health food, medical researchers analyzed the health records of nearly 180,000 Americans and determined that the ones with a daily java habit were less likely to get a common type of liver cancer than their less-caffeinated counterparts. The study , presented this week at the American Assn. for Cancer Research's annual meeting in San Diego, may not be enough to get your coffee break covered by your health insurance, but the results were striking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | Tony Perry
Putting the brakes on a controversial bill to ban killer whale shows at SeaWorld San Diego, an Assembly committee Tuesday called for additional study that could take at least 18 months. Naomi Rose, a marine mammal scientist at the Animal Welfare Institute, one of the bill's sponsors, said she was disappointed by the move but pleased at the idea of more study -- although it remained unclear how the study would be conducted. John Reilly, president of SeaWorld San Diego, said he doubted a compromise is possible with people backing the bill.
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