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Studio Audience

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NEWS
December 31, 1993 | MAUREEN SAJBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a camera pans the studio audience of a typical TV show, it often reveals the dregs of fashion: the bright and unpressed apparel of tourists who have been nabbed by professional audience wranglers outside Mann's Chinese Theater or the Universal Studio tour. But a few behind-the-scenes crowds appear to take some interest in fashion. And at least one image-conscious producer sees to it that his groups make a good impression on home viewers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
David Letterman announced an end to his three-decade career in late night on Thursday night's "Late Show. " And it's apparent from the audience members' reaction that they had no idea it was coming. In fact, the stunned silence following Letterman's announcement was probably caused by the studio audience awaiting the punchline to the gag they thought Letterman was setting up. "Leslie [Moonves], it's been great. You've been great. The network has been great. But I'm retiring," Letterman said from his desk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991 | MICHAEL HILL, BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
As midnight approached in the East, the deadline for the possibility of war, it was 9 p.m. in the West. Outside Stage 25 on the Paramount studio lot, a security guard huddled over his tiny portable television set. Two other workers on the lot saw the blue glow and hurried over. "What's happening?" one asked. "Nada," the guard replied.
SPORTS
December 11, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Andrew McCutchen envisioned telling the world how much he loved his girlfriend from the top of the highest mountain. He also thought he might do it with a voice as loud as a lion's roar ... times a billion! Now that's loud. When those two options apparently didn't work out, the Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder and newly crowned National League MVP got some help from Ellen DeGeneres, who let him proclaim his love for Maria Hanslovan on her daytime talk show Wednesday. video platform video management video solutions video player "I didn't do any of this for the publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011
OPRAH BY THE NUMBERS Average number of Americans who view her show each week: 40 million Countries in which the show runs: 150 Emails Oprah.com receives a week: 25,000 People who can fit in her studio audience: 315-365 Items given away during her Favorite Things episodes: 283 Books selected as part of Oprah's Book Club: 65 Hours of the show that have been...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
For Kids Only: On Saturday, when most kids usually are watching cartoons, ABC and NBC will try to explain the Persian Gulf war to them. ABC's effort, anchored by Peter Jennings, is a 90-minute special, "War in the Gulf: Answering Children's Questions." The show, with a studio audience of 30 children, starts at 7:30 a.m. At 9:30 a.m. will be a special 2-hour edition of NBC's "Today" show that includes a segment for children about the war.
OPINION
September 28, 2012
Re "Why don't they just answer the question?," Opinion, Sept. 23 I was about 12 years old when I heard a debate on the radio that prompted me to ask my parents why the debaters didn't answer the questions. Fast-forward 61 years and the names and faces have changed, but a politician's refusal to respond to a question with a related and meaningful answer remains unchallenged. As long as moderators remain fearful of appearing overly aggressive or mindful that a candidate may start refusing interview requests, a dumbed-down society that is more enamored of sound bites and reality shows will continue to be satisfied with evasion and subterfuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Neal Marlens and Carol Black, the creators of ABC's "The Wonder Years," had plenty of time last season to hand-craft each episode of the nostalgic comedy, which reminisces about life in suburbia circa 1968 through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy. After all, there were only six episodes. The run was short but sweet--the show won favorable reviews, was picked up for fall and netted an Emmy Award as the season's best comedy series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Garry Shandling, the comedian, has co-created and starred in two television shows over the course of his career. Each played with the conceptual physics of the medium itself, and skipped back and forth across the dotted line that divides the actual from the fictional. Each featured Shandling as a comedian somewhat less successful than himself, if possibly no less insecure. And each was born in premium cable and helped establish it as a venue for quality work long before Tony Soprano first decided to see a psychiatrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1987 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
In what has become sort of a tradition for co-hosts of CBS' morning programs, Mariette Hartley bid an earlier-than-planned adieu Tuesday to CBS' lame duck "The Morning Program." "I can't believe this is the end," she told viewers at the end of her last show. It was disclosed during the program that she is leaving before "The Morning Program" ends its run to make a movie called "1969." Sandy Hill will succeed Hartley until the show's Nov. 27 finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Irish singer Jordan O'Keefe's performance on Britain's Got Talent reverberated with a global audience online, attracting more than 1 million online views since the televised semifinal competition Saturday. With the help of Attraction, a Hungarian theater group, O'Keefe's rendition of Leona Lewis' "Footprints in the Sand" evoked tears from the judges (even Simon Cowell welled up, according to published accounts). The Hungarian group's earlier stage appearance, during the first week of competition, produced a similarly emotional reaction from the studio audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Dustin Roasa
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - Moy Da hasn't seen his sister in nearly 40 years. Like countless Cambodian families, they were separated during the reign of the Khmer Rouge. The brutal communist regime made it official policy to dismantle the nuclear family, which it considered a capitalist relic, and divided much of the population into slave labor camps. In 1975, Moy Da, then 5 years old, and his parents, who died three years later, lost track of 15-year-old Pheap when the Khmer Rouge emptied Phnom Penh and marched residents to the countryside.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
As New York and the surrounding areas continued to clean up the enormous mess left by Hurricane Sandy, most of the city's late-night shows - and one temporary import, "Jimmy Kimmel Live" - were back on the air Tuesday. The most notable exceptions were "The Daily Show" and "The Colbert Report," both of which were canceled, thereby depriving election- and storm-weary viewers of some much-needed levity. For the second night in a row, Letterman delivered a desk-bound monologue before a vacant Ed Sullivan Theater.
OPINION
September 28, 2012
Re "Why don't they just answer the question?," Opinion, Sept. 23 I was about 12 years old when I heard a debate on the radio that prompted me to ask my parents why the debaters didn't answer the questions. Fast-forward 61 years and the names and faces have changed, but a politician's refusal to respond to a question with a related and meaningful answer remains unchallenged. As long as moderators remain fearful of appearing overly aggressive or mindful that a candidate may start refusing interview requests, a dumbed-down society that is more enamored of sound bites and reality shows will continue to be satisfied with evasion and subterfuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
Veteran TV personality and newswoman Katic Couric already has numerous accomplishments under her belt: "Today"show star, network news anchor, author, interviewer of celebrities and national figures, Sarah Palin thorn-in-side. But in her appearence at the TCA press tour to promote her upcoming syndicated talk show "Katie," Couric ticked off a few more things she'd like to do - singing in a Broadway musical, jumping out of an airplane. "And I'd like to go out with George Clooney, if you could arrange that," she quipped.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | Nardine Saad, Los Angeles Times
Oprah Winfrey's favorite thing must not have been money ... or she just had a few million dollars to spare, because the cost of her "Oprah's Favorite Things" audience giveaways adds up to about $23.8 million. Oh, to be an accountant on "The Oprah Winfrey Show. " The daytime diva wrapped her 25-year daytime talk show run Wednesday to the best ratings she's had since 1994. But Winfrey also wrapped the hopes of fans being the all-too-excited recipients in that giveaway-happy studio audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Kids used to say the darndest things. But no more, judging by the premiere of a CBS series hoping to mimic segments of that old daytime show "Art Linkletter's House Party," in which little kids would tell him just about anything that popped into their heads. Now they were funny. And you catch a bit of that tonight in some clips from that oldie introduced by Linkletter himself. Paving the way for this series were the high ratings of two "Kids Say the Darndest Things" specials.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | Nardine Saad, Los Angeles Times
Oprah Winfrey's favorite thing must not have been money ... or she just had a few million dollars to spare, because the cost of her "Oprah's Favorite Things" audience giveaways adds up to about $23.8 million. Oh, to be an accountant on "The Oprah Winfrey Show. " The daytime diva wrapped her 25-year daytime talk show run Wednesday to the best ratings she's had since 1994. But Winfrey also wrapped the hopes of fans being the all-too-excited recipients in that giveaway-happy studio audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011
OPRAH BY THE NUMBERS Average number of Americans who view her show each week: 40 million Countries in which the show runs: 150 Emails Oprah.com receives a week: 25,000 People who can fit in her studio audience: 315-365 Items given away during her Favorite Things episodes: 283 Books selected as part of Oprah's Book Club: 65 Hours of the show that have been...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Garry Shandling, the comedian, has co-created and starred in two television shows over the course of his career. Each played with the conceptual physics of the medium itself, and skipped back and forth across the dotted line that divides the actual from the fictional. Each featured Shandling as a comedian somewhat less successful than himself, if possibly no less insecure. And each was born in premium cable and helped establish it as a venue for quality work long before Tony Soprano first decided to see a psychiatrist.
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