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BUSINESS
December 5, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of the two Hollywood actors unions met Monday with top studio executives to discuss upcoming labor talks, but set no timetable to start formal negotiations, representatives from both sides said. Officials from the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists used the Encino meeting to outline their major issues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By David Colker
Tom Sherak had a long career as a studio executive and was involved in hundreds of films, including "Black Hawk Down," "Mrs. Doubtfire" and "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace. " But Sherak is best known for the jobs he did for free or almost free. For three years ending in 2012, he was outspoken president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, , during which he launched initiatives but also had to deal with public controversies, including the replacement of the producer and host of an Oscar show.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 2007 | Marc Lifsher and Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, responding to calls that he get involved in the Hollywood writers' strike, which had reached its eighth day, held a private meeting with union officials Monday, a spokesman said. The governor was scheduled to have a similar, informal sit-down with unidentified studio executives today, said his press secretary, Aaron McLear. Several studio representatives said they were unaware of any such meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A man posing as a studio executive, but apparently actually working as an undercover FBI agent targeting state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello), contacted Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar's office last year with questions about city permits. Records and interviews indicate the agent represented himself as Rocky Patel, president of Los Angeles-based United Pacific Studios. Sometime last year, the councilman's spokesman said, Patel apparently sought information on securing a conditional use permit for a production studio in Huizar's district.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2003 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Jack Valenti isn't ready to hit the road just yet. A meeting of top studio executives Monday didn't produce any definitive timetable or plan to find a successor for Hollywood's top lobbyist, although a half-dozen or so names of potential candidates whom executives like were discussed. Sources said there is no consensus at this point, adding that studio executives promised to take up the issue again after Labor Day.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2009 | John Horn, Ben Fritz and Rachel Abramowitz
Hollywood's biggest slasher story isn't playing at any theater near you. It's hitting the industry's corporate suites, where the sacking of studio executives has reached epidemic level. As evidenced by Disney's recent firing of its studio chief, Dick Cook, and Universal Pictures' dismissal Monday of chairmen Marc Shmuger and David Linde, Hollywood is in a state of panic-producing turmoil. It used to be that Hollywood's corporate parents could stomach a dry spell from their studio managers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | Robert W. Welkos, Special to The Times
THE scene opens with a herd of duckbill dinosaurs gorging on kelp. A Tyrannosaurus rex, towering 22 feet, suddenly appears, unleashing a blood curdling roar as its prey scatter, but one duckbill dinosaur remains trapped in the water. The T-Rex crashes through the surf and ruthlessly rips him from the sea. It suddenly stops -- sensing a powerful presence in the water. Its red reptilian eyes, glowing like lasers, scan the ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bush Cancels Paramount Visit: President Bush, who had been scheduled to take a tour of Paramount Studios this morning, instead will visit the new North County Correctional Facility in the hills below Castaic, the White House said. A spokesman said that the studio visit was scrubbed for logistical reasons and that Bush would still be able to talk to studio executives at a breakfast speech Friday before the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2006 | Meg James
NBC announced a shake-up in its Burbank executive ranks, with three high-level programmers pushed out to make room for two studio executives. Katherine Pope, an executive at NBC Universal Television Studio, was named executive vice president of NBC Entertainment, the chief deputy to Entertainment President Kevin Reilly. Pope will be in charge of NBC's new series development. Another studio executive, Jeff Ingold, was named head of NBC's comedy development.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
"Star Trek" fans will have to wait a bit longer to see where the crew of the starship Enterprise is boldly going next. The release of J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek," with a new cast taking on the roles of Capt. James T. Kirk, Spock and other original characters, has been moved from Christmas Day to May 8, 2009, distributor Paramount said Thursday. Studio spokesman Michael Vollman said "Star Trek" would be finished by fall in time for its original release date, but studio executives decided to hold it until next summer, when the film could pull in more money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Meg James and John Horn
Rick Finkelstein, a longtime Universal Pictures executive who was featured in a documentary about injured athletes after he was paralyzed in a ski accident, died Tuesday of cancer, the studio said. He was 64. Finkelstein, known for his sharp mind and business acumen, for years led the studio's home video and television distribution. He most recently was in charge of the studio's strategic planning and anti-piracy efforts. He also was the studio's representative on the Board of Directors of the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Wang Jianlin is the wealthiest man in China, owns the biggest theater chain in the world and wants to create the world's largest movie studio in his home country. Hollywood is taking the billionaire chairman of Dalian Wanda Group Corp. seriously, but proceeding cautiously. Studio executives, talent agents and luminaries such as Leonardo DiCaprio, Nicole Kidman and Harvey Weinstein stood with Wang for the Sunday unveiling of the planned Oriental Movie Metropolis - an $8.2-billion project that would include 20 film and TV sound stages near Qingdao, along with a theme park, wax museum and space for an annual film festival.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2013 | By Ben Fritz and Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Coming soon to a theater near you: a multimillion-dollar battle over coming attractions. Theater owners are squeezing extra coin out of film companies by charging them to play the trailers for their upcoming movies. Traditionally, theater owners were happy to run the advertisements for upcoming movies on the understanding that they drove box-office receipts and concession-stand sales. Studios paid to make the trailers and cinemas screened them. Each movie came with two coming attractions attached, while others ran at the discretion of the theater, often as a result of lobbying by Hollywood marketers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Jacob Silverman
Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See A Novel Juliann Garey Soho Press: 30 pp, $25 Gird yourself: Greyson Todd, the narrator of Juliann Garey's "Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See," is a bipolar studio executive, and sharing his head space can be a fascinating, grueling trip down the path of mental illness. Greyson shades toward the antihero, asking you to hate him nearly as much as he hates himself. He offers little quarter for the timid. Still, I could not help emerging from Garey's first novel with a deep sympathy for Greyson and admiration for his creator.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Sony Pictures Chairman Michael Lynton is the first Hollywood executive to be honored by Harvard's Hasty Pudding Institute. The 242-year-old group is giving Lynton its first-ever "Order of the Golden Sphinx" for his work supporting philanthropy and arts education during his long career in the media business, including stints at Walt Disney Co., Time Warner and AOL, before taking the reins of Sony in 2004. Lynton received his B.A. and M.B.A. from Harvard. Previously, Hasty Pudding has given man and woman of the year awards to such performers as Jimmy Stewart, Elizabeth Taylor and Bob Hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Is Hollywood having a blowout year or a dismal one? The confounding answer: both. This weekend, "The Dark Knight Rises"is expected to dominate the box office, joining "The Avengers"and "The Hunger Games"in a small, elite group of high-profit 2012 blockbusters. Buoyed by strong reviews and an eager fan base, director Christopher Nolan's final Batman movie will probably debut with around $190 million in ticket sales, and has a shot at surpassing the three-day "Avengers" record of $207 million.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JAMES BATES
With the Newt Year upon us, why not a Gingrich-inspired "Contract With Hollywood" for studio executives, filmmakers and stars? Here's a suggestion of how one might read: Resolved, that within the first 100 days of returning from Aspen, Vail, Maui and St. Bart, we shall bring up for public discussion these issues, each to be given full and open debate: 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fire raced through a building at the Universal Studios back lot Wednesday exactly one year after a wind-whipped blaze destroyed $25 million of the company's historic movie sets. But this time the fire was no more real than the New York street where smoke billowed from a movie-land facade. It was just the first act in a studio extravaganza. Universal Studios recreated the fire--and an explosion, an earthquake and a toxics spill--as part of a three-day seminar on how to deal with disasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Mo Rothman, a veteran studio executive who helped pave the way for Charlie Chaplin to end an acrimonious, two-decade exile from the United States and returned some of the filmmaker's classic movies to American screens, died Sept. 15 in Los Angeles. He was 92. Rothman had Parkinson's disease, his family said. Rothman had met Chaplin in the 1950s when he was a European manager for United Artists. Chaplin, one of the founders of United Artists along with D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, was one of Hollywood's most powerful and creative figures until his image was tarnished by affairs with underage women and his leftist politics, which made him a target of McCarthy-era Communist hunters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Laura Ziskin, a veteran film producer who helped break Hollywood's glass ceiling for women, has died. She was 61. Ziskin died Sunday of breast cancer at her home in Los Angeles, said a spokesman at Sony Pictures, where she had a producing deal and made many of her movies in recent years. Ziskin, who had fought a seven-year battle with the disease, also founded a nonprofit televised event, Stand Up to Cancer, that has raised more than $200 million for cancer research. Best known for producing all the films in the "Spider-Man" franchise — including the upcoming release "The Amazing Spider-Man" — Ziskin had a profound effect on what contemporary moviegoers watch.
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