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Studs Terkel

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Once upong a time, before A&E had grown into the network that brings us "Hoarders" and "Storage Wars," it was a highbrow cable channel. A&E stood for "arts and entertainment" and showed things like operas and symphonies. In its most nascent form, it was Alpha Repertory Television Service, or ARTS. An evening of ARTS programming in 1981 included "an organ recital from Notre Dame Cathedral; an essay on the painter Edouard Manet; a ballet tribute to the sculptor Alexander Calder; a profile of Ernest Hemingway, narrated by Anthony Burgess, and a short film starring the mime Marcel Marceau.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | David L. Ulin and Elaine Woo
When Andre Schiffrin was fired in 1990 as editor in chief of Pantheon Books, it was regarded as a loud shot in the war between commercialism and quality in American publishing. There were protests by noted authors, including Studs Terkel and Kurt Vonnegut, and op-ed pieces that painted a pessimistic view of the industry. In response, Schiffrin's bosses pointed out that Pantheon had lost $3 million in his last year at the helm. His ouster ended a nearly three-decade career at the prestigious imprint, where he had worked with such writers as Jean-Paul Sartre, Marguerite Duras and Gunter Grass.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1995
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Studs Terkel will read from some of his favorite stories on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at USC's GroundZero Coffeehouse. Admission for the event, hosted by the USC Division of Student Affairs, is $18 for the public, $12 for USC faculty and staff, and $5 for USC students. Seating is limited, so guests are advised to arrive 30 minutes early to get a seat. No standing-room tickets will be sold. For tickets and information, call (213) 740-7111.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Studs Terkel was a master storyteller, or maybe story-listener. His oral histories showed that with the right ear, he could make an interview something special -- he got to the heart of things, to the hearts of people. His book " Working : People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do," published in 1974, became a smash hit -- in Terkel's hands, the work lives of everyday people became fascinating. This is our 1974 review of the book by the L.A. Times' Robert Kirsch.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Confronted by a robber in his Chicago bedroom, best-selling author Studs Terkel pulled out a wad of cash, and it was hastily grabbed. But Terkel wasn't cowed. "I said, 'Hey, I'm flat broke now, gimme 20 bucks,' " the 87-year-old former radio host and Pulitzer Prize winner said of the late-night break-in. The unmasked robber complied, handing back a $20 bill. The experience was "simply dreamlike," the effervescent Terkel told ABC-TV, "as if somebody choreographed a slow dance at midnight."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Writer, radio host and oral historian Studs Terkel, a 93-year-old Chicago icon, has been released from the hospital there after undergoing risky open-heart surgery. Terkel, who walked out of Rush University Medical Center Wednesday, underwent six hours of surgery Aug. 9 to replace a narrowed aortic valve and redo one of five coronary bypasses he had nine years ago, doctors said. "To my knowledge, Studs is the oldest patient to undergo this complex redo," said Dr.
NEWS
January 2, 1985 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Studs Terkel, oral historian, disc jockey and liberal, has a fantasy--he's transported in time to the day that Jesus was crucified. As he explained his fanciful wish, Terkel leaned forward, red tie skewed across red-checked shirt, white hair (that he insists makes him look like Spencer Tracy when combed a certain way) spraying across his head, voice rising and falling for dramatic effect: "I got a tape recorder and it's the day of the Crucifixion and I'm at the foot of Calvary.
OPINION
March 19, 2000 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to The Times. Her oral history "State of the Arts: California Artists Talk About Their Work" will be published in October
Nobody knows Americans the way Louis "Studs" Terkel does. Since his first book of oral history, "Division Street: America," in 1967, Terkel has traveled the country, documenting the way people feel about how they live and work. The otherwise "anonymous many" have talked to him about the Great Depression in "Hard Times" (1970), their jobs in "Working" (1974) and old age in "Coming of Age" (1996).
BOOKS
September 24, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
To compile his most controversial "talking book," Studs Terkel interviewed dozens of Americans representing diverse economic strata, educational levels and ethnicities. The result is a profoundly disillusioned work that reveals a society as deeply divided as it was during the '60s, but along economic, rather than ideological, lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2005 | Bob Baker, Special to The Times
IT'S tempting to mock this uneven collection of conversations as an attempt by Studs Terkel, now 93, to squeeze every penny out of every inch of recording tape he's used in four decades of collecting oral histories. It's tempting to complain that the book's title is misleading -- people rarely sing in these pages, they simply talk about singing, or playing or composing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Once upong a time, before A&E had grown into the network that brings us "Hoarders" and "Storage Wars," it was a highbrow cable channel. A&E stood for "arts and entertainment" and showed things like operas and symphonies. In its most nascent form, it was Alpha Repertory Television Service, or ARTS. An evening of ARTS programming in 1981 included "an organ recital from Notre Dame Cathedral; an essay on the painter Edouard Manet; a ballet tribute to the sculptor Alexander Calder; a profile of Ernest Hemingway, narrated by Anthony Burgess, and a short film starring the mime Marcel Marceau.
HEALTH
May 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
This is the story Harlan Ellison tells of that day in 1982: He had just assaulted his publisher. Before anyone could think to call the police, Ellison's editor sneaked him out of the building in the freight elevator. He jumped into a cab and 15 minutes later walked into a studio to tape a talk show with Isaac Asimov, Gene Wolfe, Calvin Trillin and Studs Terkel. "I have just come from physically assualting the CEO of Grosset & Dunlap," he recalls telling them. That didn't get captured on tape -- see the video of the show here -- but he did mention being frustrated with his publisher.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
A man in upstate New York has just about finished a task that was common enough until the invention of the printing press: Over the past four years, he has copied the King James Bible by hand , the Associated Press reports. Phillip Patterson, a 63-year-old resident of Philmont, N.Y., a town near the Massachusetts border, may be an unlikely scribe for the Bible. He is not especially religious, for one thing, though he does go to church.  A retired interior designer whose battles with anemia and AIDS have often slowed his work, he began the monumental task mostly out of curiosity.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2009 | Kristen Mack
Studs Terkel, the American storyteller, author, radio host, actor and activist, sought a job at the FBI, according to recently released documents. Terkel, who died last year at 96, applied for a job in the FBI's fingerprints division in the 1930s. "It's a non-agent position," FBI spokesman Bill Carter said. "You would have to go through a background investigation, the same as you would for an agent, but you don't have arrest powers." Instead of hiring Terkel, the agency ended up amassing a file on him. The FBI spent 45 years tracking him as a suspected communist, according to the 147 pages released from his 269-page dossier.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Rutten is a Times staff writer.
Studs Terkel, who died last month at the age of 96, was America's most popular oral historian. Though never a "writer" of the first rank, he nevertheless was a unique contributor to American letters and a vital link to the current of idealistic indigenous radicalism that once enlivened it. "P.S.
SPORTS
November 8, 2008
Helene Elliott's interview with Tim Leiweke was about to receive my usual wrath of skepticism (even though I love Elliott's work covering hockey), but something else I read Thursday rendered that topic -- and frankly everything else in the sports section -- almost moot. Kurt Streeter's "Through Obama . . . ." column was downright captivating and perhaps the most important article written this year. Thank you, Mr. Streeter, for your compelling discussion of a potential "Obama Effect" and how it would impact society as a whole.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
"It's hard to have a sense of humor if you're just considered nothing." That's Studs Terkel talking, and he knows what he's saying. For six decades he's been telling people about themselves in several media, and winning a Pulitzer Prize along the line.
BOOKS
October 28, 2007 | Jon Meacham, Jon Meacham, the editor of Newsweek, is the author of "American Gospel" and "Franklin and Winston."
IN the beginning, before blogs, there was Studs Terkel, who, more than anyone else in what Time-Life founder Henry Luce called the American Century, gave the great mass of Americans who were not Henry Luce a way to be heard. "I have, after a fashion, been celebrated for having celebrated the lives of the uncelebrated among us; for lending voice to the face in the crowd," Terkel, now 95, writes in "Touch and Go," his new memoir.
OPINION
November 5, 2008
Re "Studs Terkel, 1912-2008," Obituary, Nov. 1 I first met Studs Terkel when I became senior vice president at Playboy Enterprises and started spending a lot of time in Chicago. He was easygoing and acerbic, witty and contemplative, curious and laid-back, but always interested in life around him. I ran into him twice while he was waiting at a bus stop for public transportation; appropriate, as he so loved the public. This morning, I pulled out my well-worn copy of "Working" in his memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2008 | Stephanie Simon, Simon is a former Times staff writer.
Studs Terkel, who made his name listening to ordinary folks talk about their ordinary lives -- and who turned that knack for conversation into a much-honored literary career -- died Friday. He was 96. Terkel died of old age at his home in Chicago, his son Dan said. "He lived a long, eventful, satisfying, though sometimes tempestuous life," Dan Terkell said. "I think that pretty well sums it up."
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