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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A daily glucosamine drink supplement failed to prevent deterioration of knee cartilage, reduce bone bruises or ease knee pain, according to a recent short-term study of the popular, if controversial, dietary product.  In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology , authors studied the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride on a group of 201 adults for six months. "Our study found no evidence that drinking glucosamine supplement reduced knee cartilage damage, relieved pain or improved function in individuals with chronic knee pain," said the study's lead author, Dr. C. Kent Kwoh, professor of medicine and medical imaging at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | Tony Perry
Putting the brakes on a controversial bill to ban killer whale shows at SeaWorld San Diego, an Assembly committee Tuesday called for additional study that could take at least 18 months. Naomi Rose, a marine mammal scientist at the Animal Welfare Institute, one of the bill's sponsors, said she was disappointed by the move but pleased at the idea of more study -- although it remained unclear how the study would be conducted. John Reilly, president of SeaWorld San Diego, said he doubted a compromise is possible with people backing the bill.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
Robert Proctor doesn't think ignorance is bliss. He thinks that what you don't know can hurt you. And that there's more ignorance around than there used to be, and that its purveyors have gotten much better at filling our heads with nonsense. Proctor, a professor of the history of science at Stanford, is one of the world's leading experts in agnotology, a neologism signifying the study of the cultural production of ignorance. It's a rich field, especially today when whole industries devote themselves to sowing public misinformation and doubt about their products and activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
After years of contentious debate, a long-running and sharply criticized plan to extend Orange County's toll road network to the San Diego County line has been shelved. The extension would have added miles to the county's maze of tollways but also would have cut - in the view of some - perilously close to San Onofre State Beach and one of the state's most treasured surf breaks. On Tuesday, officials with the Transportation Corridor Agencies announced they had canceled environmental studies for the massive 241 extension and said they would pursue less-ambitious alternatives.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
After languishing for years in the shadows of psychiatry's definition of adult depression, irritability is finally getting some respect again. It's about damned time, you might say. A new study has found that people suffering a major depressive episode who report they have become grouchy, hostile, grumpy, argumentative, foul-tempered or angry will likely have a "more complex, chronic and severe form" of major depressive disorder than those who...
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
If you're talking tech with Americans, you may want to avoid using any jargon. A recent study found that many Americans are lost when it comes to tech-related terms, with 11% in a survey saying that they thought HTML - a language that is used to create websites - was a sexually transmitted disease. The study was conducted by Vouchercloud.net , a coupons website, as a way to determine how knowledgeable users are when it comes to tech terms. VIDEO: Unboxing the Quirky Spotter multipurpose sensor "Technology is a huge interest for our user base, and month after month we see thousands of people visiting our site to look for coupons and deals to use when purchasing their favorite tech products," a company spokeswoman said in a statement.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By David Colker
Underage drinkers who participated in a study to see if they could buy alcoholic beverages online were successful in 45% of attempts. The study, conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, recruited eight people, ages 18 to 20, to try to purchase wine, beer and other beverages online, according to Bloomberg News. To keep participants on the right side of the law in case they got caught, each got a letter of immunity from the local district attorney. The participants were instructed, for the purposes of the study, to lie about their age when filling out order forms.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Don't press the like button: Facebook is a bummer that makes us feel worse about our lives, according to new research. Facebook users in a study led by the University of Michigan wound up feeling worse about themselves after two weeks, and their moment-to-moment mood darkened the more they browsed the social medium. It didn't seem to matter how big their network was, how supportive they thought their friends were, nor why they went to Facebook in the first place, according to the study published online Wednesday in PLOS One . "We were able to show on a moment-to-moment basis throughout the day how people's mood fluctuated depending on their Facebook usage,” said University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the study.
HEALTH
April 3, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Getting a good grip on your health may mean … getting a good grip. The force you can muster when squeezing an object or a weight doesn't only reveal how strong your hand and arm are. It can be a measure of overall muscle function and — according to one recent study — even portend how long you're likely to live. That's not as nutty as it seems, says Richard Bohannon, a professor of physical therapy at the University of Connecticut. "Grip strength reflects your overall muscle status and a general sense of how much muscle mass you have" he says.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
One in five Americans has admitted to peeing in a public swimming pool, according to a new survey. That's 20% of Americans urinating where others swim. Besides being disgusting, peeing in the pool may be seriously harmful to your health. In a new study , researchers from China Agricultural University and Purdue University looked at what happened when uric acid, a byproduct of urine, and chlorine combined. The group found dangerous chemical reactions were a result of this unholy union.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
California-based Virgin America ranked highest among the nation's top 15 carriers in a study that looked at on-time performance, customer complaints and lost bag rates, among other factors. The study, known as the Airline Quality Rating report, also found that airline performance improved in 2013 over the previous year. The ratings report was produced by researchers at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Wichita State University and was based on data collected by the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FT. BRAGG, North Carolina - Within the tight circle of Army spouses, Kris Johnson and Rebecca Sinclair became close friends as their ambitious husbands advanced rapidly in the officer corps. Both women were ultimately betrayed by their philandering spouses. Both endured public humiliation as their high-ranking husbands were hauled before courts-martial amid salacious testimony about adultery and other sex-related military crimes. And both women, along with their children, risked losing a lifetime of military benefits if their husbands were dismissed from the Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The nation needs to better acknowledge and support the efforts of the "hidden heroes" from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars: the estimated 1.1 million civilian, volunteer caregivers tending to the needs of wounded and disabled veterans, according to recommendations contained in a Rand Corp. study released Monday. While family members and others have long cared for veterans, the veterans from two recent wars are more likely to have mental health and substance problems, making the task of providing care even more difficult, according to the study, funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Laura J. Nelson
A plan for increasing the sales tax to fix Los Angeles' broken streets is on a collision course with a similar levy being pushed for regional transit projects. Two weeks ago, the top budget advisor to the Los Angeles City Council said a tax increase is the only way thousands of miles of severely damaged roads and sidewalks will get repaired. A half-cent increase in the sales tax, which would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years, should appear on the November ballot, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said.
SCIENCE
March 31, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Bariatric surgery did more to improve symptoms of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol after three years than intensive treatment with drugs alone, according to new results from a closely watched clinical trial involving patients who were overweight or obese. Study participants who had gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy also lost more weight, had better kidney function and saw greater improvements in their quality of life than their counterparts who did not go under the knife, researchers reported Monday.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last year, after it was revealed that the National Security Agency was indiscriminately scooping up records of Americans' telephone calls under an expansive interpretation of the Patriot Act, President Obama urged the public to relax. "Nobody is listening to your telephone calls," he said. As for the so-called metadata that was being vacuumed up and stored by the government - the source, destination and duration of calls - the president assured the nation that the program was free of abuses and subject to aggressive oversight.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
Freud asked, "What does woman want?" Harley-Davidson has the answer. She wants a motorcycle -- or should. That is the result of a study of female motorcycle riders and non-riders, commissioned by the Wisconsin-based bike manufacturer. Female riders were twice as likely as their non-riding counterparts to feel "confident. " They were twice as likely, too, to feel "extremely satisfied" with their appearance. More than half of those riders said the two-wheeled experience made them feel "free" and "independent.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
People who are socially isolated are more likely to die prematurely, regardless of their underlying health issues, according to a study of the elderly British population. The findings, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that when mental and physical health conditions were factored out, the lack of social contact continued to lead to early death among 6,500 men and women tracked over a seven-year period. "They're dying of the usual causes, but isolation has a strong influence," said study author Andrew Steptoe, an epidemiologist at University College London.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Chris Foster
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Florida defeated UCLA in the 2011 NCAA tournament, eliminating the Bruins in the second round. Still, it was a Sweet 16 moment for current UCLA freshman guard Bryce Alford - his birthday was a couple of months earlier. "I just got my driver's license," Alford recalled. "I was driving. " To a high school kid from New Mexico, UCLA's loss was far from monumental. "I probably watched the game, or saw the score, whatever," Alford said. "It didn't have a whole lot of importance to me. " It's said that those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it. But does that apply to basketball?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Laura Nelson
Southern California freeways are smoother than they were two years ago, but nearly a quarter of lane miles are still in poor condition - the highest percentage of any California region, according to a new pavement quality study. About 22% of the 6,295 freeway miles in Los Angeles and Ventura counties have major potholes, severe cracks or are otherwise in bad condition, according to a statewide Caltrans survey of pavement conditions from 2011 to 2013. That figure is a dramatic improvement from two years ago, the study said, when about one-third of area freeway miles were in poor condition.
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