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BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By David Colker
Underage drinkers who participated in a study to see if they could buy alcoholic beverages online were successful in 45% of attempts. The study, conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, recruited eight people, ages 18 to 20, to try to purchase wine, beer and other beverages online, according to Bloomberg News. To keep participants on the right side of the law in case they got caught, each got a letter of immunity from the local district attorney. The participants were instructed, for the purposes of the study, to lie about their age when filling out order forms.
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SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's 10 Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest -- the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Eight of the schools chose to participate and here is what we found: -- Many of the best tennis players at the college level have been raised in hyper-competitive environments.
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SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
After languishing for years in the shadows of psychiatry's definition of adult depression, irritability is finally getting some respect again. It's about damned time, you might say. A new study has found that people suffering a major depressive episode who report they have become grouchy, hostile, grumpy, argumentative, foul-tempered or angry will likely have a "more complex, chronic and severe form" of major depressive disorder than those who...
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when an airline such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launches service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers - United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American Airlines and US Airways.
HEALTH
April 3, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Getting a good grip on your health may mean … getting a good grip. The force you can muster when squeezing an object or a weight doesn't only reveal how strong your hand and arm are. It can be a measure of overall muscle function and — according to one recent study — even portend how long you're likely to live. That's not as nutty as it seems, says Richard Bohannon, a professor of physical therapy at the University of Connecticut. "Grip strength reflects your overall muscle status and a general sense of how much muscle mass you have" he says.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
People who are socially isolated are more likely to die prematurely, regardless of their underlying health issues, according to a study of the elderly British population. The findings, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that when mental and physical health conditions were factored out, the lack of social contact continued to lead to early death among 6,500 men and women tracked over a seven-year period. "They're dying of the usual causes, but isolation has a strong influence," said study author Andrew Steptoe, an epidemiologist at University College London.
SCIENCE
May 12, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
By quizzing small children about the first events they remember — a cousin misbehaving, a trip to a grocery store, a mother's bribe of red and green licorice — researchers have discovered that the earliest memories of children shift as they get older, and don't solidify into the first memories carried throughout life until about age 10. The research, published Wednesday in the journal Child Development, could help psychologists better understand...
SCIENCE
September 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Forget that stereotype about the dumb jock. A new study reveals that kids who are more physically fit score higher on geography tests, too. Previous research has found that out-of-shape kids get lower grades in school and perform worse on tasks involving memory and other types of cognitive function. In addition, mice that exercise have better spatial learning and memory than sedentary mice. For the new study, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign wondered whether there was a correlation between physical fitness and learning.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Don't press the like button: Facebook is a bummer that makes us feel worse about our lives, according to new research. Facebook users in a study led by the University of Michigan wound up feeling worse about themselves after two weeks, and their moment-to-moment mood darkened the more they browsed the social medium. It didn't seem to matter how big their network was, how supportive they thought their friends were, nor why they went to Facebook in the first place, according to the study published online Wednesday in PLOS One . "We were able to show on a moment-to-moment basis throughout the day how people's mood fluctuated depending on their Facebook usage,” said University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the study.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when airlines such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launch service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers: United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American and US Airways.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
People who took statins to lower their cholesterol levels ate more calories and fat in 2009-10 than did those who took them a decade earlier, raising the question of whether the drug provides a false sense of dietary security. Researchers who used data from a national health survey found that in 1999-2000, people who took statins ate fewer calories, by an average of 179 a day, and less fat than people who didn't take them. The differences began to shrink, and by 2005-06, the difference was insignificant.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A government study on the effects of airline mergers found that flight cancellations and delays increased when competition on a route drops. The study by the U.S. Department of Transportation's inspector general was ordered by Congress in the wake of the proposal to merge American Airlines and US Airways into the world's largest air carrier. The study looked at delays and cancellation rates when the number of airlines serving a route dropped from three to two airlines. It looked at 32.2 million flights and flight performances from 70 U.S. airports.
HOME & GARDEN
April 25, 2014 | Mark Paredes
She had me at privyet . I had just delivered a talk in Romania on Jewish-Mormon relations (a niche topic, to be sure) at a church in Bucharest, and standing before me was Florina, a raven-haired beauty who greeted me in Russian after learning we had both lived in Moscow. Then she switched to English, which she had acquired as an au pair in London. I was a never-married bachelor in my early 40s and had begun to doubt that Miss Right and I would ever cross paths, much less during a speaking tour of Eastern Europe.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
In the wake of a $10-million payout to a whistleblower, UCLA's School of Medicine is drawing more scrutiny over its financial ties to industry and the possibility that they compromised patient care. A new study in this month's Journal of the American Medical Assn. raised a red flag generally about university officials such as Eugene Washington, the dean of UCLA's medical school who also serves on the board of healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson. The world's biggest medical-products maker paid Washington more than $260,000 in cash and stock last year as a company director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Jason Song
The USC Shoah Foundation will expand its study of genocide by establishing a new center devoted to the study of mass killings and how such violent incidents begin, officials announced Friday. The foundation was started by film director Steven Spielberg on the set of his film "Schindler's List" and became part of USC in 2006. The foundation has collected more than 52,000 eyewitness testimonies of survivors of the Holocaust, Rwandan genocide and Nanjing Massacre.  The new group, called the Center for Advanced Genocide Research, will focus on resistance to mass killings and how the violence impacts emotional and physical behavior.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Consider this next time you're sitting in traffic on the freeway: You're in a zone where air pollution can be five to 10 times higher than in surrounding areas. Even inside your vehicle, you're probably breathing in pollutants through the windows or the air vents. After an hourlong commute, you've likely doubled your daily exposure to the harmful particles in vehicle exhaust. A new study says the single best thing you can do to protect yourself is roll up the windows and set your vehicle's ventilation system to 'recirculate.' Using that setting -- typically a button that shows a car with an arrow inside -- can cut pollution concentrations inside a typical car to 20% of on-road levels, scientists found.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
What to do if you don't like/disagree with the findings of a scientific study? For some, it appears that the answer is to start a petition to have the study retracted, and to accuse the researchers of bias and being in the pay of nefarious industry concerns. After days of heated reaction to a study published last week about organic foods, north of 2,900 people have signed the petition, at change.org, calling for the paper to be withdrawn. Here are the nuts and bolts of the report by Stanford University scientists, which was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine : The researchers pooled together studies addressing the health benefits of organic and conventionally grown foods.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Mary McNamara
Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer. Two years ago, when CBS premiered the crime-procedural "Elementary," the decision to make Sherlock Holmes (played by Jonny Lee Miller) a modern-day recovering addict seemed equally canny and risky. Holmes is indeed literature's most famous and enduring druggie - in Nicholas Meyer's "Seven-Percent Solution" none other than Sigmund Freud helped him kick the coke habit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A decade ago, as a foreign correspondent traveling through South America, I witnessed cellphone technology's march across the globe-- to a remote corner of the Peruvian Amazon, where even tricycle taxi drivers had them.   Now smartphone technology is completing its own conquest of the developing world. Handheld devices that allow you to browse the Web, or read a book, are now ubiquitous in South America, sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian subcontinent. This week, UNESCO reports on an unexpected consequence of the smartphone revolution: People with limited access to books are reading more, thanks to those tiny, portable screens.
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