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Stupid Pet Tricks

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989
Concerning Daniel Cerone's "How to Train an 1,800-Pound Movie Star," Oct. 22: Doug Seus (who trained a Kodiak for the newly released movie, "The Bear") and his ilk are no better than glorified, overpaid circus trainers who kidnap majestic animals from the wilderness and con them into performing the cinematic equivalent of David Letterman's "stupid pet tricks." Their antics should be condemned by environmentalists, for they are motivated by greed rather than the preservation of this great, uniquely North American mammal.
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OPINION
April 9, 2014 | Meghan Daum
In a final passing of the torch to a new generation of late-night talk show hosts, David Letterman announced last week that he would retire in 2015. As intelligent and unique a force as he's always been, the timing seems right. Since beginning his late-night career more than 30 years ago, Letterman has evolved from exuberant, smart-alecky nerd to crotchety, occasionally befuddled elder statesman. Watching him now, it's hard to believe he was once considered the epitome of edginess, a darling of the college crowd and hero to sarcastic eggheads everywhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't talk "Stupid Pet Tricks" or "Top 10" lists with Conan O'Brien, NBC's replacement for departed late-night host David Letterman. Although Letterman turned those features into popular staples of the "Late Night" show--and NBC may fight to keep him from using them on CBS--O'Brien is not interested in retaining them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Scott Collins and Meredith Blake
The scramble to succeed late-night host David Letterman has talent handlers and Las Vegas oddsmakers shouting their picks from the sidelines. Politicians are squabbling over whether his replacement should be based in Los Angeles or New York. But those issues may be the least of the worries for CBS, which must program for a vastly different TV landscape than when it hired Letterman away from NBC 21 years ago to launch its "Late Show" franchise. The late-night field is more crowded, profits aren't what they used to be, and the audience is now a lot older.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If David Letterman does Stupid Pet Tricks on CBS, will NBC take him to court? Earlier this summer, NBC threatened to sue Letterman if he used his Top 10 list, Stupid Pet Tricks and some popular characters from "Late Night With David Letterman" on his new show for CBS, which premieres to much fanfare tonight. NBC's position is that, under "intellectual property" laws, it owns the rights to "Late Night With David Letterman" and elements in the show that were developed at NBC.
SPORTS
March 8, 1986 | KAREN KINGSBURY
David Letterman would have been proud of the way his alma mater, Ball State University, lost a non-conference volleyball match to Northridge Friday night. Letterman, the host of NBC's "Late Night" program, would have enjoyed how the Indiana team performed a parody on the comedian's own Stupid Pet Tricks. Before the match ended, No. 10 ranked Ball State did everything but roll over and play dead, losing 15-7, 13-15, 16-14, 16-14. But for the Matadors, it was no joke.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
--Max will be remembered for his love of a steamy shower in the morning, his fascination with women as they put on their makeup and his tolerance of grocery shopping. He will also be remembered as perhaps the only African gray parrot to receive a full church funeral. Services for Capt. A.G. Maximilian Cricket--"Max" to his friends--were held at the First Presbyterian Church in Santa Clara, Calif., with the Rev. Wayne Faust presiding.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | Meghan Daum
In a final passing of the torch to a new generation of late-night talk show hosts, David Letterman announced last week that he would retire in 2015. As intelligent and unique a force as he's always been, the timing seems right. Since beginning his late-night career more than 30 years ago, Letterman has evolved from exuberant, smart-alecky nerd to crotchety, occasionally befuddled elder statesman. Watching him now, it's hard to believe he was once considered the epitome of edginess, a darling of the college crowd and hero to sarcastic eggheads everywhere.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The "dot-com" fairy tale turned into a macabre farce this year as one e-commerce company after another flopped and business bystanders clucked about the stupidity of it all. But it wasn't so long ago that plenty of smart people thought selling dog food, plush sofas and barbecue grills over the Internet were good ideas. Today's prevailing consensus about the absurdity of these e-commerce concepts illustrates how much the dot-com landscape has changed in the last 12 months.
SPORTS
May 29, 2004 | Rob Fernas, Times Staff Writer
Here are the top 10 signs your favorite NBA team probably won't make the playoffs, as delivered by basketball Hall of Famers on the "Late Show with David Letterman" this week: 10. Oscar Robertson: "Owner won't pay for team to travel to away games." 9. Robert Parish: "Coach used timeout to go get Spike Lee's autograph." 8. Rick Barry: "Your teammate spends the whole game guarding the ref." 7. George Gervin: "Power forward has been out two months with the hiccups." 6.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The "dot-com" fairy tale turned into a macabre farce this year as one e-commerce company after another flopped and business bystanders clucked about the stupidity of it all. But it wasn't so long ago that plenty of smart people thought selling dog food, plush sofas and barbecue grills over the Internet were good ideas. Today's prevailing consensus about the absurdity of these e-commerce concepts illustrates how much the dot-com landscape has changed in the last 12 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When, back in January, David Letterman committed to host the 67th annual Academy Awards, he issued a press release making two promises--to bring the show in at under 45 minutes, and to give away a brand new automobile as part of the proceedings. Facetious as those two vows seemed to be, Letterman actually will be keeping his word on one of them tonight. Which one? Hint: If you're taping the show for next-day viewing, you'll probably still want to use the EP speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If David Letterman does Stupid Pet Tricks on CBS, will NBC take him to court? Earlier this summer, NBC threatened to sue Letterman if he used his Top 10 list, Stupid Pet Tricks and some popular characters from "Late Night With David Letterman" on his new show for CBS, which premieres to much fanfare tonight. NBC's position is that, under "intellectual property" laws, it owns the rights to "Late Night With David Letterman" and elements in the show that were developed at NBC.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't talk "Stupid Pet Tricks" or "Top 10" lists with Conan O'Brien, NBC's replacement for departed late-night host David Letterman. Although Letterman turned those features into popular staples of the "Late Night" show--and NBC may fight to keep him from using them on CBS--O'Brien is not interested in retaining them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Scott Collins and Meredith Blake
The scramble to succeed late-night host David Letterman has talent handlers and Las Vegas oddsmakers shouting their picks from the sidelines. Politicians are squabbling over whether his replacement should be based in Los Angeles or New York. But those issues may be the least of the worries for CBS, which must program for a vastly different TV landscape than when it hired Letterman away from NBC 21 years ago to launch its "Late Show" franchise. The late-night field is more crowded, profits aren't what they used to be, and the audience is now a lot older.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986
I just knew there would be letters criticizing the picture of Nicolas Cage and his inverted cat Lewis (Calendar Letters, Oct. 26), most likely written by those who do not own cats. Being a devoted cat lover, I know that felines are most resilient creatures. I have often, in the spirit of fun, lifted my cats by their tails without receiving so much as a dirty look. It seems to me from the description of Lewis as a frisky critter that Nicolas has a good rapport with his little roommate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989
About Michael Wilmington's Oct. 25 review of "The Bear": As if director Jean-Jacques Annaud wasn't cruel enough to animals by making this movie, now Wilmington has the gall to say good things about it! When I first saw the preview for this movie, I was furious that such a thing could be produced in a time when many of us are striving to protect animals. This is a film in which a bear cub, in the name of "entertainment," must scale a cliff wall and fall into rushing rapids.
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