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NEWS
August 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Young fish of an impressive species that dates to prehistoric times will soon be navigating the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers for the first time since humans began tinkering with the waterways about six decades ago. Wildlife officials plan to release 750 pallid sturgeon into the two rivers at four sites near the confluence of the rivers southwest of Williston, N.D. The hope is the fish will make a comeback.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
ELVERTA, Calif. - With your flute of French Champagne this weekend, how about a little caviar on toast from Sacramento? To the surprise of many would-be gourmands, the halcyon days of caviar are over. Most of the world's production no longer comes from such exotic spots as Russia's Volga River and western Asia's Caspian Sea. Those supplies are almost completely depleted from pollution, poaching, and overfishing of the caviar-egg-bearing sturgeon. Instead, it turns out that Sacramento County now is the epicenter of U.S. sturgeon and caviar production, and experts say California now accounts for an estimated 70% to 80% of U.S. production.
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NEWS
December 5, 1993 | Associated Press
Federal biologists have captured an Alabama sturgeon for the first time since 1985, apparently settling one major issue--whether it is extinct--in the controversy over whether the fish should be declared an endangered species. James Stewart, a Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, said the fish was caught Thursday morning in the lower Alabama River. An Alabama business coalition opposed to listing the fish as endangered had questioned whether the fish still existed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo A Parody Lars Arffssen St. Martin's/Griffin: 201 pp., $9.99 paper In "The Girl With the Sturgeon Tattoo," somebody's strangling female reindeer all over Sweden. These strange deaths are somehow tied to the decapitation murders of two writers: the author of a bestselling book on Baltic sturgeon and a thriller writer with a manuscript that reveals the Nazi origins of furniture giant UKEA. Got that? As for the Swedish authorities, they think a single culprit is responsible, someone described as "a psychopathic serial killer who's probably also a world-class surgeon … or an experienced samurai warrior.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the state of California was suffering one of its severest fiscal crises, it approved spending more than $50,000 this summer to learn more about the sexual maturity of a female fish. The state-sponsored study is being conducted by UC Davis researchers, who are working with a handful of Central Valley fish farms eager to develop a way to tell when their female sturgeons will mature and be ripe for spawning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2009 | Associated Press
California game wardens have arrested seven Sacramento-area men on suspicion of poaching rare sturgeon from the Sacramento River in Colusa County. The Department of Fish and Game said the men used young salmon for bait, then sold their illegal catches. Lt. John Laughlin said wardens found evidence that Ivan Banatskyi had helped illegally kill at least 18 fish since October. He was free on $15,000 bail after his arrest Friday. Laughlin said sturgeon can sell for $2,000 to $4,000 per fish.
SPORTS
January 25, 1995 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trevor Kennedy dipped his rod tip forward, then reared back and set the hook. The fish sprinted toward the lush, green hills of nearby Tiburon, and leaped and tumbled before crashing down and speeding off again. Kennedy gained line when he could, but he had trouble stopping the beast, which had no intention of leaving the safety of its murky world at the end of a line. Finally, after about 25 minutes, the fish had no fight left.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He knows they're down there, somewhere, vacuuming red worms out of the silt just as they've done for millions of years. He also knows the chances one will pass beneath his 3-foot by 4-foot hole in 138,000 acres of ice are not good. So John Mattes watches closely, one 20-pound trident on his left, another spear with four tines on his right, staring into the rectangle of eerie green light minute after hour after day after year, 30 seasons now.
SPORTS
February 22, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Capt. Mike Andrews guided his boat slowly through the morning haze to an area just past Benicia. This, he said, seemed the best place to carry on the search for one of nature's more interesting creatures, the white sturgeon. The 40-foot sportfisher, one of a small fleet berthed beneath the Carquinez Bridge, was the first out. A chilling breeze nipped at Andrews' red-faced passengers, all regulars, who hoped this would be their lucky day.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | MIKE COWLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gordie Faust stared recently at the decoy on the bottom of ice-covered Lake Winnebago on the first day of sturgeon-spearing season, diligently waiting to see if one of the dinosaur-era fish would swim by his hole this year. He did not appear to be concerned. Last year, after 20 years of pulling his wooden fishing shanty onto the frozen lake, cutting a 4-by-4-foot hole into the ice and staring into the fluorescent green square of water for hundreds of hours, Faust speared his first sturgeon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2009 | Associated Press
California game wardens have arrested seven Sacramento-area men on suspicion of poaching rare sturgeon from the Sacramento River in Colusa County. The Department of Fish and Game said the men used young salmon for bait, then sold their illegal catches. Lt. John Laughlin said wardens found evidence that Ivan Banatskyi had helped illegally kill at least 18 fish since October. He was free on $15,000 bail after his arrest Friday. Laughlin said sturgeon can sell for $2,000 to $4,000 per fish.
NEWS
July 2, 2006 | Bagila Bukharbayeva, Associated Press Writer
Three men struggle to lift a squirming 6 1/2 -foot gray fish with a pointy nose and jagged spine and spill it into the Caspian's green water. Off it swims with two others, all trailing satellite receivers wired to their dorsal fins. Thus begins a pilot study that scientists hope will yield valuable information about a species of sturgeon hearty enough to have survived from prehistoric times but now on the brink of extinction due to the insatiable appetite of the well-to-do for caviar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
In a sweeping crackdown on poachers, state game wardens arrested 17 people Thursday across California on suspicion of illegally catching endangered fish and shellfish and selling some to restaurants. Dozens of agents in California and Oregon targeted three operations in the Bay Area and Sacramento and charged suspects with illegal harvest of abalone and sturgeon -- two species considered delicacies that have suffered sharp declines in recent years.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
The United Nations on Tuesday all but blocked caviar exports until the producing country could provide more information about the sustainability of its sturgeon catch. Many sturgeon species are suffering "serious population declines" and new quotas proposed by exporting countries might not fully reflect the stock reductions or make allowances for illegal fishing, said the U.N.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government is preparing to ban imports of beluga caviar to help prevent extinction of the sturgeon that produces the prized eggs. Trade in beluga sturgeon -- one of 25 species of sturgeon -- would be suspended, a Fish and Wildlife Service spokesman said. That includes the black caviar and meat of the beluga sturgeon. The service planned to announce the ban this week. The ban will start as soon it is published in the Federal Register. * Also Constellation Brands Inc.
BOOKS
May 29, 2005 | Kai Maristed, Kai Maristed is the author of the novels "Broken Ground," "Out After Dark" and "Fall."
In the case of Acipenseriformes, the ancient order of which sturgeon and paddlefish are the sole survivors, the chicken definitely came before the egg. The meat of this giant of the deep, a candidate for the Loch Ness monster whose fossil record stretches back more than 200 million years, was apparently prized by the early Greeks and Romans.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The caviar poachers gathered on the beach before the fierce sun dawned over the Caspian Sea. They belted down a morning vodka, claiming it prevented seasickness. Then they launched their wooden boats into the pale waters, knowing full well that the precious, prehistoric sturgeon they would hunt this day is a threatened species.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1989
Datametrics has named James D. Sturgeon Jr. vice president of operations. Sturgeon, 55, was previously vice president of operations at Resdel Engineering Corp. in Arcadia. Datametrics is a Chatsworth maker of printers for the military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Susana Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Wildlife officials arrested nine people in Northern California on Thursday on suspicion of illegally possessing and selling white sturgeon caviar. The arrests were the result of two months of surveillance in one operation and three weeks in another. More arrests might follow. "We know there's a lot more going on," said Steve Martarano, a spokesman for the state Department of Fish and Game. White sturgeon are prized for their eggs, or roe, which are processed for caviar.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | David Lukas
[ACIPENSER TRANSMONTANUS] Broad-bodied and sluggish, the massive white sturgeon is a reflection of the mighty rivers it inhabits. This ancient fish is covered with bizarre bony plates instead of scales and looks like a living fossil as it prowls deepwater shadows in search of invertebrates and fish. Using long feelers to sense prey, the sturgeon sucks in food like a vacuum cleaner when it opens its cavernous mouth.
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